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Himalayan Glaciers are melting 10 times higher than the average rate


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Global warming melting Himalayan glaciers at an ‘exceptional’ rate, study says

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The world has presented scientists with a new flashing warning sign.

 

According to a new study, global warming is causing glaciers in the Himalayas to melt at an “exceptional rate.” The research was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

 

The glaciers are also melting there faster than any other region of the world, threatening the water supply of close to 2 billion people. Only Antartica and the Arctic have more ice than the Himalayas.

 

“Our findings clearly show that ice is now being lost from Himalayan glaciers at a rate that is at least 10 times higher than the average rate over past centuries,” University of Leeds professor and researcher Jonathan Carrivick, the study’s lead author, said in a statement. “This acceleration in the rate of loss has only emerged within the last few decades and coincides with human-induced climate change.”

 

The study found that the glaciers in the Himalayas had lost as much as 40% of their area, much of it since the 1970s.

 

The glaciers supply water to people who live in the mountains and in the valleys near rivers like the the Ganges, Indus and Brahmaputra, and many others.

A colleague of Carrivick said time is running out to prevent further disaster.

 

“This research is just the latest confirmation that those changes are accelerating and that they will have a significant impact on entire nations and regions,” University of Dundee researcher Simon Cook, one of the study’s co-authors, said.

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6 minutes ago, benson13 said:

That's why Mother Nature sent covid19 and it's good the gop keeps lying to their cult vaccines are bad... I want them to keep dying because in their death we might save the earth.

MOTHER NATURE?    HAHAHAHAHA

YOU REALLY ARE ARE DUMB PORCH MONKEY.

DID FRANKENFAUCI USE YOU FOR HIS MAD SCIENTIST EXPERIMENTS?

THAT WOULD EXPLAIN EVERYTHING 

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Hotter ocean temperatures, fueled in part by human-caused climate change, are eroding the eastern ice shelf. If the shelf breaks apart, the glacier’s contribution to sea level rise could eventually increase by as much as 25%, the scientists said.

 

Ice loss in Antarctica has been growing worse in recent years and research suggests that a dangerous amount of sea level rise will occur if global warming reaches about three degrees Celsius (5.4 degrees Fahrenheit) above preindustrial levels. The Earth has already has surpassed one degree Celsius of warming.

 

“We are already on track for sea level rise in the next several decades that will impact coastal communities worldwide,” Pettit said. “We can’t reverse this sea level rise, so we need to consider how to mitigate it and protect our coastal communities now.”

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7 minutes ago, benson13 said:

 50 miles of Florida will be gone in less than 80 years

 

 

I agree...Easily!!

So 50 miles gone in less than 80 years

 

That's like 1/2 mile a year

When's this gonna start?

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The paper’s article details a Union of Concerned Scientists report that took a flood model from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and applied it to housing information from real estate database Zillow. The findings were alarming.

 

“By 2045, nearly 64,000 homes in Florida face flooding every other week. Half of those are in South Florida,” the Miami Herald writes.

 

And a little further down the road, the number of Floridians who could lose their homes to rising seas may explode.

 

“By the end of the century, Florida’s number of at-risk homes jump from 64,000 to a million. In 2100, the report said, about one in 10 homes in Florida will face flooding every other week,” the paper continues. “That puts the Sunshine State at the top of the list nationwide for homes at risk.”

 

The findings offer a stark reminder that without prompt, serious action to transition our global economy away from the fossil fuels driving the climate crisis toward clean, renewable energy like wind, solar, and geothermal, hundreds of thousands of people in Florida (and millions more around the world) may find their homes swamped by mid-century.

 

But coastal real estate isn’t the only thing in Florida threatened by water creeping up the coast. Anticipated sea-level rise in the state will also impact the state’s tourism and fresh water supplies. Florida's massive tourism industry could lose $178 billion annually by 2100.

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Yes Benny...

We know

 

So in a couple years 1/2 mile of Daytona will be gone?

And in less than 80 years Orlando will be beach front?

 

That means in about 2030 7-8 miles of Daytona will be totally under water..

 

Gone!-

 

And you fall for this crap?

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8 minutes ago, Z09 said:

Yes Benny...

We know

 

So in a couple years 1/2 mile of Daytona will be gone?

And in less than 80 years Orlando will be beach front?

 

That means in about 2030 7-8 miles of Daytona will be totally under water..

 

Gone!-

 

And you fall for this crap?

So Benny..

In a couple years 1/2 mile of Daytona will be under water...

And you fall for this crap?

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2 hours ago, benson13 said:

Global warming melting Himalayan glaciers at an ‘exceptional’ rate, study says

  •  

The world has presented scientists with a new flashing warning sign.

 

According to a new study, global warming is causing glaciers in the Himalayas to melt at an “exceptional rate.” The research was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

 

The glaciers are also melting there faster than any other region of the world, threatening the water supply of close to 2 billion people. Only Antartica and the Arctic have more ice than the Himalayas.

 

“Our findings clearly show that ice is now being lost from Himalayan glaciers at a rate that is at least 10 times higher than the average rate over past centuries,” University of Leeds professor and researcher Jonathan Carrivick, the study’s lead author, said in a statement. “This acceleration in the rate of loss has only emerged within the last few decades and coincides with human-induced climate change.”

 

The study found that the glaciers in the Himalayas had lost as much as 40% of their area, much of it since the 1970s.

 

The glaciers supply water to people who live in the mountains and in the valleys near rivers like the the Ganges, Indus and Brahmaputra, and many others.

A colleague of Carrivick said time is running out to prevent further disaster.

 

“This research is just the latest confirmation that those changes are accelerating and that they will have a significant impact on entire nations and regions,” University of Dundee researcher Simon Cook, one of the study’s co-authors, said.

"10x higher"?

IMG_0047.JPG

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2 hours ago, benson13 said:

MON, DEC 13 2021

A major Antarctic ice shelf could shatter within five years, scientists warn

The Thwaites Glacier, which is the size of Florida, is already responsible for about 4% of global annual sea level rise.

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/1...

we're coming out of an ice age beavis...

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6 hours ago, benson13 said:

Global warming melting Himalayan glaciers at an ‘exceptional’ rate, study says

  •  

The world has presented scientists with a new flashing warning sign.

 

According to a new study, global warming is causing glaciers in the Himalayas to melt at an “exceptional rate.” The research was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

 

The glaciers are also melting there faster than any other region of the world, threatening the water supply of close to 2 billion people. Only Antartica and the Arctic have more ice than the Himalayas.

 

“Our findings clearly show that ice is now being lost from Himalayan glaciers at a rate that is at least 10 times higher than the average rate over past centuries,” University of Leeds professor and researcher Jonathan Carrivick, the study’s lead author, said in a statement. “This acceleration in the rate of loss has only emerged within the last few decades and coincides with human-induced climate change.”

 

The study found that the glaciers in the Himalayas had lost as much as 40% of their area, much of it since the 1970s.

 

The glaciers supply water to people who live in the mountains and in the valleys near rivers like the the Ganges, Indus and Brahmaputra, and many others.

A colleague of Carrivick said time is running out to prevent further disaster.

 

“This research is just the latest confirmation that those changes are accelerating and that they will have a significant impact on entire nations and regions,” University of Dundee researcher Simon Cook, one of the study’s co-authors, said.

If you hurry you can catch a ride with Trump headed to Scotland. 

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6 hours ago, benson13 said:

 

 

35984c4b022e1e251e25579789202882.jpg

 

 

“This is not some distant problem of the future. This is a problem that is affecting Americans right now. Whether it means increased flooding, greater vulnerability to drought, more severe wildfires — all these things are having an impact on Americans as we speak.”
 

— U.S. President Barack Obama, interview with Al Roker, May 6, 2014

 

 

casa Obama

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