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Mayo pathologist talks virus, leaky vaccines


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5 minutes ago, crazyhole said:

Did you watch the video?

I perused it. 
 

You know, drs make great dear-mongerers. 
 

What I did hear him say, like siuppression of Covid treatments, has been thoroughly debunked. 
 

What do you think people in the hospital are receiving but treatment?

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1 hour ago, Pastafarian said:

Nothing quite like fear-mongering without any evidence and relying on speculation. 
 

Great job. 

Watch this cardiologist testify before TX legislature...

 

 

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53 minutes ago, Pastafarian said:

I perused it. 
 

You know, drs make great dear-mongerers. 
 

What I did hear him say, like siuppression of Covid treatments, has been thoroughly debunked. 
 

What do you think people in the hospital are receiving but treatment?

 

"Thoroughly Debunked"

 

A Democrat National Socialist propaganda talking-point to replace the comment:

"Shit, this doesn't look good for the Coup!"

 

So ya know.

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1 hour ago, Pastafarian said:

Nothing quite like fear-mongering without any evidence and relying on speculation. 
 

Great job. 

Kinda like everything we are being told by the establishment medical, governmental and media "experts"?

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5 hours ago, Pastafarian said:

I perused it. 
 

You know, drs make great dear-mongerers. 
 

What I did hear him say, like siuppression of Covid treatments, has been thoroughly debunked. 
 

What do you think people in the hospital are receiving but treatment?

He wasn't fear-mongering at all, just discussing how the vaccines work and what could be happening.   

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35 minutes ago, Pastafarian said:

So pile it on. 
 

The disease is real. What  the establishment speculating?

 

Do show a SINGLE semi-rational person who does think the disease is REAL. Of course it is real.

 

Speculation on the effectiveness of the vaccine for one. Seems like more of a prophylactic based on what we are seeing.

 

Also the lack of curiosity or reporting of the effectiveness of NATURAL immunity.

 

The constant drumbeat of fear is coming from the left for the most part.

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The part that I found most interesting was explaining how ADE works in layman's terms.   The virus actually uses a person's white blood cells to replicate, causing the body to create more white blood cells that are then also used by the virus to replicate.    Basically a vicious cycle where a person's immune system actually makes the situation far worse.   I wonder if (assuming this really does happen with covid) that an immunosupppresant like HCQ may actually come back into the fold as a treatment later on.    

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FFS give it up. 

 

There has been no ADE after hundreds of millions of vaccinations globally.

 

Your only hope for vaccine-caused ADE (which you apparently desperately want to see) is a massive crazy conspiracy covering it up... on a global scale. It's absolutely absurd.

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4 minutes ago, Toldya said:

FFS give it up. 

 

There has been no ADE after hundreds of millions of vaccinations globally.

 

Your only hope for vaccine-caused ADE (which you apparently desperately want to see) is a massive crazy conspiracy covering it up... on a global scale. It's absolutely absurd.

Not at all.   I want to see the Trump vaccines save millions of lives, which they have.    This is a discussion on science.   

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4 minutes ago, crazyhole said:

Not at all.   I want to see the Trump vaccines save millions of lives, which they have.    This is a discussion on science.   

 

They aren't Trump vaccines, FFS.

 

Throwing taxpayer dollars at something doesn't mean you invented it.

 

Grow up.

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30 minutes ago, Toldya said:

 

They aren't Trump vaccines, FFS.

 

Throwing taxpayer dollars at something doesn't mean you invented it.

 

Grow up.

He made it possible to produce them in such a short period of time, and his quick action saved millions of lives so they should definitely be called the Trump vaccines.   Impossible without his leadership.   

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4 minutes ago, crazyhole said:

He made it possible to produce them in such a short period of time, and his quick action saved millions of lives so they should definitely be called the Trump vaccines.   Impossible without his leadership.   

 

So any other president of the US would have sat on their hands and done nothing?

 

Come on. 

 

Throwing money at big pharma in the midst of a pandemic is so obvious that even Trump could get it right. 

 

The only difference is that a different president wouldn't have bungled the other stuff as hard.

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14 hours ago, crazyhole said:

Well...he has not been with the Mayo Clinic since 2004.

And apparently, he was only a resident there on a fellowship.

https://independentdocsid.com/RyanColeMD

 

And basically, several people a LOT more respected than Cole disagree with him:

 

'To those bogus claims, Cole has now added: “mRNA trials in mammals have led to odd cancers. mRNA trials on mammals have led to autoimmune diseases — not right away, six, nine, 12 months later.”

We asked Cole to provide support for those claims, and he referred us to a 2018 paper published in the journal Nature Reviews Drug Discovery that reviewed trials and studies of various, earlier mRNA vaccines.

But that paper doesn’t support his statement.

Norbert Pardi, a research assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, was the lead author of the paper. He told us in an email, “No publications demonstrate that mRNA vaccines cause cancer or autoimmune diseases.”

Pardi’s 19-page paper does make one passing reference to autoimmune diseases, which is what Cole highlighted to us.

The paper says: “A possible concern could be that some mRNA-based vaccine platforms induce potent type I interferon responses, which have been associated not only with inflammation but also potentially with autoimmunity. Thus, identification of individuals at an increased risk of autoimmune reactions before mRNA vaccination may allow reasonable precautions to be taken.”

But, Pardi explained, he and the other researchers included that passage because they wanted to note some potential concerns. However, he emphasized that “no scientific evidence has confirmed that these concerns are real.”

It’s also worth noting that the paper predated the COVID-19 pandemic by two years, so it doesn’t include any information specifically about the COVID-19 vaccines.

Simply put, “there is no scientific evidence that shows that mRNA vaccines cause autoimmune diseases,” Pardi said. “Multiple clinical trials have been performed with mRNA vaccines in the past 10 years and none of them found that mRNA vaccination caused autoimmune diseases. Further, we are not aware of any studies showing an autoimmune disease appearing many months after vaccination as Dr. Cole inaccurately suggests.”

Likewise, Dr. Roger Shapiro, associate professor of immunology and infectious diseases at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, told us in an email that he was unaware of any study that would support Cole’s claim that the vaccines are carcinogenic.

“There is nothing in the science of mRNA vaccines that would suggest carcinogenicity, and they have been tested in humans for other diseases before COVID-19,” Shapiro said. “mRNA rapidly breaks down in the body, and probably does not last long enough to act as a carcinogen.”

“Regarding autoimmunity,” he said, “this is always a concern with any medical product, but there is no evidence to date suggesting it, and it does not seem any more likely than with other vaccines. mRNA is made all the time in our bodies, and delivering it by vaccine should not be different.”

Dr. Dean Winslow, an infectious disease physician at Stanford Health Care, concurred with the other experts with whom we spoke. In a phone interview, he characterized Cole’s claims about cancer as “fearmongering” and said, “There’s just no scientific basis for that.”

“We’re talking about these very small fragments of messenger RNA that don’t hang around for long at all,” he said, noting that the mRNA vaccines have been in use for almost six months and have been “very safe, very well-tolerated vaccines.”

Winslow recognized that some people are concerned that the mRNA from the vaccine might persist in their bodies and somehow change their genetics or cause long-term effects. So he emphasized that the vaccines have small fragments of RNA, which survive only briefly and carry information about the virus that causes COVID-19.

Similarly, Pardi told us, “COVID-19 mRNA vaccines do not alter our DNA and they get rapidly degraded so they do not promote cancer formation.”'

 

https://www.factcheck.org/2021/04/scicheck-idaho-doctor-makes-baseless-claims-about-safety-of-covid-19-vaccines/

 

 

People?

ALWAYS check the sources and backgrounds of these people whom make these (or almost ANY) claims before you give them ANY credence.

 

 

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14 minutes ago, McRocket said:

Well...he has not been with the Mayo Clinic since 2004.

And apparently, he was only a resident there on a fellowship.

https://independentdocsid.com/RyanColeMD

 

And basically, several people a LOT more respected than Cole disagree with him:

 

'To those bogus claims, Cole has now added: “mRNA trials in mammals have led to odd cancers. mRNA trials on mammals have led to autoimmune diseases — not right away, six, nine, 12 months later.”

We asked Cole to provide support for those claims, and he referred us to a 2018 paper published in the journal Nature Reviews Drug Discovery that reviewed trials and studies of various, earlier mRNA vaccines.

But that paper doesn’t support his statement.

Norbert Pardi, a research assistant professor of medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, was the lead author of the paper. He told us in an email, “No publications demonstrate that mRNA vaccines cause cancer or autoimmune diseases.”

Pardi’s 19-page paper does make one passing reference to autoimmune diseases, which is what Cole highlighted to us.

The paper says: “A possible concern could be that some mRNA-based vaccine platforms induce potent type I interferon responses, which have been associated not only with inflammation but also potentially with autoimmunity. Thus, identification of individuals at an increased risk of autoimmune reactions before mRNA vaccination may allow reasonable precautions to be taken.”

But, Pardi explained, he and the other researchers included that passage because they wanted to note some potential concerns. However, he emphasized that “no scientific evidence has confirmed that these concerns are real.”

It’s also worth noting that the paper predated the COVID-19 pandemic by two years, so it doesn’t include any information specifically about the COVID-19 vaccines.

Simply put, “there is no scientific evidence that shows that mRNA vaccines cause autoimmune diseases,” Pardi said. “Multiple clinical trials have been performed with mRNA vaccines in the past 10 years and none of them found that mRNA vaccination caused autoimmune diseases. Further, we are not aware of any studies showing an autoimmune disease appearing many months after vaccination as Dr. Cole inaccurately suggests.”

Likewise, Dr. Roger Shapiro, associate professor of immunology and infectious diseases at Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health, told us in an email that he was unaware of any study that would support Cole’s claim that the vaccines are carcinogenic.

“There is nothing in the science of mRNA vaccines that would suggest carcinogenicity, and they have been tested in humans for other diseases before COVID-19,” Shapiro said. “mRNA rapidly breaks down in the body, and probably does not last long enough to act as a carcinogen.”

“Regarding autoimmunity,” he said, “this is always a concern with any medical product, but there is no evidence to date suggesting it, and it does not seem any more likely than with other vaccines. mRNA is made all the time in our bodies, and delivering it by vaccine should not be different.”

Dr. Dean Winslow, an infectious disease physician at Stanford Health Care, concurred with the other experts with whom we spoke. In a phone interview, he characterized Cole’s claims about cancer as “fearmongering” and said, “There’s just no scientific basis for that.”

“We’re talking about these very small fragments of messenger RNA that don’t hang around for long at all,” he said, noting that the mRNA vaccines have been in use for almost six months and have been “very safe, very well-tolerated vaccines.”

Winslow recognized that some people are concerned that the mRNA from the vaccine might persist in their bodies and somehow change their genetics or cause long-term effects. So he emphasized that the vaccines have small fragments of RNA, which survive only briefly and carry information about the virus that causes COVID-19.

Similarly, Pardi told us, “COVID-19 mRNA vaccines do not alter our DNA and they get rapidly degraded so they do not promote cancer formation.”'

 

https://www.factcheck.org/2021/04/scicheck-idaho-doctor-makes-baseless-claims-about-safety-of-covid-19-vaccines/

 

 

People?

ALWAYS check the sources and backgrounds of these people whom make these (or almost ANY) claims before you give them ANY credence.

 

 

Let's assume all of this is true.   

 

Reconcile the fact that we've never had an approved mRNA treatment of any kind, even though the technology is 20 years old.    Why were the previous attempts rejected?   

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18 minutes ago, crazyhole said:

Let's assume all of this is true.   

 

Reconcile the fact that we've never had an approved mRNA treatment of any kind, even though the technology is 20 years old.    Why were the previous attempts rejected?   

I have no idea.

 

But it seems you are assuming that must mean they are bad.

Why can it not be that they just wanted to test the crap out of the stuff before they tried it en masse?

 

And you have no, major, scientific proof, whatsoever (except from crackpots like this dude seems) that these mRNA vaccines are causing any more serious side effects then non-mRNA vaccines have. Possibly less.

 

And the more I study mRNA technology?

The more it seems almost impossible for it to cause any problems, years down the line.

It simply has neither the genetic material nor the half life to do so.

 

Whatever these vaccines are going to do to people in terms of serious, side effects?

Would almost certainly have happened by how - with over 5 billion people vaccinated.

 

You want to believe they are bad or whatever - that's your business.

You want to take the other things anti-vaxxer's recommend?

Go ahead. I hope it works for you. The more options for humanity, the better.

But, there is NO SUBSTANTIVE, factual, scientific data to back up that claim of vaccine danger - as of right now.

 

And it has been almost 9 months since the vaccines began.

With 5 BILLION given out.

That is a HECK of a lot of data.

And I have seen NOT A HINT of 'mass DEATHS'.

Except from the anti-vaxxer's who keep rolling out evidence that almost always turns out to be nothing or massively overblown.

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