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The Gun-Rights Movement Fed America’s Insurrectionist Fever Dreams


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text

 

 

You can't be trusted to act responsibly. You must be told what to do, in no uncertain terms.

 

 

The Gun-Rights Movement Fed America’s Insurrectionist Fever Dreams (msn.com)

(Full article at above link)

 

 

Much of the blame for last week’s horrific assault on the Capitol lies with the president and his allies; that much is clear. But another force in society has done more than its part, inculcating insurrectionist fantasies in the American mind for decades: the gun-rights movement.

Since the 1990s, the idea that Americans would need to band together and violently overthrow the government has been the key to establishing and expanding the market for guns. It has also been used to justify citizens’ right to march around in public with assault rifles slung casually over a shoulder or hoisted high at angry protests. The argument for self-defense only goes so far. If people want a gun to defend themselves and their family, then handguns will do.

  And a self-defense argument largely limits guns to the household; that’s where you would be most intent on protecting your family. This was not good enough for gun manufacturers eager to sell absurdly powerful firearms, such as semiautomatic rifles, which are properly at home on the battlefield.

After the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary, when a man slaughtered first graders with a semiautomatic rifle, the stage seemed set for an assault-rifle ban. The public-health case against them was strong: Semiautomatic rifles are designed to kill lots of people in a matter of seconds. They have no place in civil society.

But gun-rights advocates were busy making gun ownership about something else entirely: freedom—specifically freedom from incipient tyranny.

Conservative commentators echoed that message.

Andrew Napolitano, for example, quickly dismissed public-health and practical concerns over assault rifles: “Today, the limitations on the power and precision of the guns we can lawfully own … [assures] that a tyrant can more easily disarm and overcome us. It protects the right to shoot tyrants, and it protects the right to shoot at them effectively, with the same instruments they would use upon us.”

With arguments like these, the gun-rights movement cleared the path for insurrection. It blew a hole in the rule of law—and Donald Trump’s would-be soldiers clamored through it. And then scaled the walls of Congress.

What our armed insurrectionists ask for—what they have unwittingly sown—is destruction of the rule of law. This is of course deeply ironic, since gun-rights advocates insist that they represent, and bolster, law and order. They’ve never understood that men with assault rifles slung over camouflaged shoulders are the avatar of lawlessness.

Gun-rights extremists have thus lived in a fantasy world of looming insurrection, which politicians have happily cultivated when it has suited them.

This year has revealed all too well what insurrectionist fever dreams bring: In the spring, they delivered mobs who occupied state capitols and threatened legislators; in the summer, they led to dead protesters in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and Portland, Oregon; now they have wrought death and destruction in Congress. The gun-rights movement deserves a reckoning for this. Our leaders should do everything in their power to enact laws that ensure peaceful protest. We must ban assault rifles and open carry. Their legality is premised on ideas that are inimical to democracy itself.

 

 

de-adder-statue-of-liberty.jpg

 

 

You people are fucking whacked. The first step in the right direction would be an assault weapons ban and a ban on open carry.

 

 

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What ignorant, self-serving pap, voke.  Laughably stupid and devoid of fact.  This nonsense was written by someone who knows exactly dick about firearms.   In the end, it says the position o

I made my point,  you're a coward, a troll  and an  anti American     

do not forget...   @drvoke relishes in trolling people    that is  his angle 

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Just now, drvoke said:

You can't be trusted to act responsibly. You must be told what to do, in no uncertain terms.

 

 

more trolling, from a troll 

 

oh and you're  a civil and  human rights violator 

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1 minute ago, drvoke said:

 

text

 

 

You can't be trusted to act responsibly. You must be told what to do, in no uncertain terms.

 

 

The Gun-Rights Movement Fed America’s Insurrectionist Fever Dreams (msn.com)

(Full article at above link)

 

 

Much of the blame for last week’s horrific assault on the Capitol lies with the president and his allies; that much is clear. But another force in society has done more than its part, inculcating insurrectionist fantasies in the American mind for decades: the gun-rights movement.

Since the 1990s, the idea that Americans would need to band together and violently overthrow the government has been the key to establishing and expanding the market for guns. It has also been used to justify citizens’ right to march around in public with assault rifles slung casually over a shoulder or hoisted high at angry protests. The argument for self-defense only goes so far. If people want a gun to defend themselves and their family, then handguns will do.

  And a self-defense argument largely limits guns to the household; that’s where you would be most intent on protecting your family. This was not good enough for gun manufacturers eager to sell absurdly powerful firearms, such as semiautomatic rifles, which are properly at home on the battlefield.

After the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary, when a man slaughtered first graders with a semiautomatic rifle, the stage seemed set for an assault-rifle ban. The public-health case against them was strong: Semiautomatic rifles are designed to kill lots of people in a matter of seconds. They have no place in civil society.

But gun-rights advocates were busy making gun ownership about something else entirely: freedom—specifically freedom from incipient tyranny.

Conservative commentators echoed that message.

Andrew Napolitano, for example, quickly dismissed public-health and practical concerns over assault rifles: “Today, the limitations on the power and precision of the guns we can lawfully own … [assures] that a tyrant can more easily disarm and overcome us. It protects the right to shoot tyrants, and it protects the right to shoot at them effectively, with the same instruments they would use upon us.”

With arguments like these, the gun-rights movement cleared the path for insurrection. It blew a hole in the rule of law—and Donald Trump’s would-be soldiers clamored through it. And then scaled the walls of Congress.

What our armed insurrectionists ask for—what they have unwittingly sown—is destruction of the rule of law. This is of course deeply ironic, since gun-rights advocates insist that they represent, and bolster, law and order. They’ve never understood that men with assault rifles slung over camouflaged shoulders are the avatar of lawlessness.

Gun-rights extremists have thus lived in a fantasy world of looming insurrection, which politicians have happily cultivated when it has suited them.

This year has revealed all too well what insurrectionist fever dreams bring: In the spring, they delivered mobs who occupied state capitols and threatened legislators; in the summer, they led to dead protesters in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and Portland, Oregon; now they have wrought death and destruction in Congress. The gun-rights movement deserves a reckoning for this. Our leaders should do everything in their power to enact laws that ensure peaceful protest. We must ban assault rifles and open carry. Their legality is premised on ideas that are inimical to democracy itself.

 

 

de-adder-statue-of-liberty.jpg

 

 

You people are fucking whacked. The first step in the right direction would be an assault weapons ban and a ban on open carry.

 

 

FUCKOFF groak...it wasn't us that started this shitstorm...

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3 minutes ago, EltonJohnson said:

 

 

more trolling, from a troll 

 

oh and you're  a civil and  human rights violator 

 

Read the condensed article. I made it easy for you. Make a point or shut your yap.

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13 minutes ago, drvoke said:

 

text

 

 

You can't be trusted to act responsibly. You must be told what to do, in no uncertain terms.

 

 

The Gun-Rights Movement Fed America’s Insurrectionist Fever Dreams (msn.com)

(Full article at above link)

 

 

Much of the blame for last week’s horrific assault on the Capitol lies with the president and his allies; that much is clear. But another force in society has done more than its part, inculcating insurrectionist fantasies in the American mind for decades: the gun-rights movement.

Since the 1990s, the idea that Americans would need to band together and violently overthrow the government has been the key to establishing and expanding the market for guns. It has also been used to justify citizens’ right to march around in public with assault rifles slung casually over a shoulder or hoisted high at angry protests. The argument for self-defense only goes so far. If people want a gun to defend themselves and their family, then handguns will do.

  And a self-defense argument largely limits guns to the household; that’s where you would be most intent on protecting your family. This was not good enough for gun manufacturers eager to sell absurdly powerful firearms, such as semiautomatic rifles, which are properly at home on the battlefield.

After the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary, when a man slaughtered first graders with a semiautomatic rifle, the stage seemed set for an assault-rifle ban. The public-health case against them was strong: Semiautomatic rifles are designed to kill lots of people in a matter of seconds. They have no place in civil society.

But gun-rights advocates were busy making gun ownership about something else entirely: freedom—specifically freedom from incipient tyranny.

Conservative commentators echoed that message.

Andrew Napolitano, for example, quickly dismissed public-health and practical concerns over assault rifles: “Today, the limitations on the power and precision of the guns we can lawfully own … [assures] that a tyrant can more easily disarm and overcome us. It protects the right to shoot tyrants, and it protects the right to shoot at them effectively, with the same instruments they would use upon us.”

With arguments like these, the gun-rights movement cleared the path for insurrection. It blew a hole in the rule of law—and Donald Trump’s would-be soldiers clamored through it. And then scaled the walls of Congress.

What our armed insurrectionists ask for—what they have unwittingly sown—is destruction of the rule of law. This is of course deeply ironic, since gun-rights advocates insist that they represent, and bolster, law and order. They’ve never understood that men with assault rifles slung over camouflaged shoulders are the avatar of lawlessness.

Gun-rights extremists have thus lived in a fantasy world of looming insurrection, which politicians have happily cultivated when it has suited them.

This year has revealed all too well what insurrectionist fever dreams bring: In the spring, they delivered mobs who occupied state capitols and threatened legislators; in the summer, they led to dead protesters in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and Portland, Oregon; now they have wrought death and destruction in Congress. The gun-rights movement deserves a reckoning for this. Our leaders should do everything in their power to enact laws that ensure peaceful protest. We must ban assault rifles and open carry. Their legality is premised on ideas that are inimical to democracy itself.

 

 

de-adder-statue-of-liberty.jpg

 

 

You people are fucking whacked. The first step in the right direction would be an assault weapons ban and a ban on open carry.

 

 

You sound scared.

 

Y u scared bro?

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10 minutes ago, drvoke said:

 

text

 

 

You can't be trusted to act responsibly. You must be told what to do, in no uncertain terms.

 

 

The Gun-Rights Movement Fed America’s Insurrectionist Fever Dreams (msn.com)

(Full article at above link)

 

 

Much of the blame for last week’s horrific assault on the Capitol lies with the president and his allies; that much is clear. But another force in society has done more than its part, inculcating insurrectionist fantasies in the American mind for decades: the gun-rights movement.

Since the 1990s, the idea that Americans would need to band together and violently overthrow the government has been the key to establishing and expanding the market for guns. It has also been used to justify citizens’ right to march around in public with assault rifles slung casually over a shoulder or hoisted high at angry protests. The argument for self-defense only goes so far. If people want a gun to defend themselves and their family, then handguns will do.

  And a self-defense argument largely limits guns to the household; that’s where you would be most intent on protecting your family. This was not good enough for gun manufacturers eager to sell absurdly powerful firearms, such as semiautomatic rifles, which are properly at home on the battlefield.

After the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary, when a man slaughtered first graders with a semiautomatic rifle, the stage seemed set for an assault-rifle ban. The public-health case against them was strong: Semiautomatic rifles are designed to kill lots of people in a matter of seconds. They have no place in civil society.

But gun-rights advocates were busy making gun ownership about something else entirely: freedom—specifically freedom from incipient tyranny.

Conservative commentators echoed that message.

Andrew Napolitano, for example, quickly dismissed public-health and practical concerns over assault rifles: “Today, the limitations on the power and precision of the guns we can lawfully own … [assures] that a tyrant can more easily disarm and overcome us. It protects the right to shoot tyrants, and it protects the right to shoot at them effectively, with the same instruments they would use upon us.”

With arguments like these, the gun-rights movement cleared the path for insurrection. It blew a hole in the rule of law—and Donald Trump’s would-be soldiers clamored through it. And then scaled the walls of Congress.

What our armed insurrectionists ask for—what they have unwittingly sown—is destruction of the rule of law. This is of course deeply ironic, since gun-rights advocates insist that they represent, and bolster, law and order. They’ve never understood that men with assault rifles slung over camouflaged shoulders are the avatar of lawlessness.

Gun-rights extremists have thus lived in a fantasy world of looming insurrection, which politicians have happily cultivated when it has suited them.

This year has revealed all too well what insurrectionist fever dreams bring: In the spring, they delivered mobs who occupied state capitols and threatened legislators; in the summer, they led to dead protesters in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and Portland, Oregon; now they have wrought death and destruction in Congress. The gun-rights movement deserves a reckoning for this. Our leaders should do everything in their power to enact laws that ensure peaceful protest. We must ban assault rifles and open carry. Their legality is premised on ideas that are inimical to democracy itself.

 

You people are fucking whacked. The first step in the right direction would be an assault weapons ban and a ban on open carry.

 

 

 

What ignorant, self-serving pap, voke.  Laughably stupid and devoid of fact.  This nonsense was written by someone who knows exactly dick about firearms.

 

In the end, it says the position of the gun rights movement is "inimical to democracy itself"; which is a GOOD THING.  Democracy is for sheep.  The United States is a CONSTITUTIONAL REPUBLIC, not a democracy.

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46 minutes ago, drvoke said:

 

text

 

 

You can't be trusted to act responsibly. You must be told what to do, in no uncertain terms.

 

 

The Gun-Rights Movement Fed America’s Insurrectionist Fever Dreams (msn.com)

(Full article at above link)

 

 

Much of the blame for last week’s horrific assault on the Capitol lies with the president and his allies; that much is clear. But another force in society has done more than its part, inculcating insurrectionist fantasies in the American mind for decades: the gun-rights movement.

Since the 1990s, the idea that Americans would need to band together and violently overthrow the government has been the key to establishing and expanding the market for guns. It has also been used to justify citizens’ right to march around in public with assault rifles slung casually over a shoulder or hoisted high at angry protests. The argument for self-defense only goes so far. If people want a gun to defend themselves and their family, then handguns will do.

  And a self-defense argument largely limits guns to the household; that’s where you would be most intent on protecting your family. This was not good enough for gun manufacturers eager to sell absurdly powerful firearms, such as semiautomatic rifles, which are properly at home on the battlefield.

After the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary, when a man slaughtered first graders with a semiautomatic rifle, the stage seemed set for an assault-rifle ban. The public-health case against them was strong: Semiautomatic rifles are designed to kill lots of people in a matter of seconds. They have no place in civil society.

But gun-rights advocates were busy making gun ownership about something else entirely: freedom—specifically freedom from incipient tyranny.

Conservative commentators echoed that message.

Andrew Napolitano, for example, quickly dismissed public-health and practical concerns over assault rifles: “Today, the limitations on the power and precision of the guns we can lawfully own … [assures] that a tyrant can more easily disarm and overcome us. It protects the right to shoot tyrants, and it protects the right to shoot at them effectively, with the same instruments they would use upon us.”

With arguments like these, the gun-rights movement cleared the path for insurrection. It blew a hole in the rule of law—and Donald Trump’s would-be soldiers clamored through it. And then scaled the walls of Congress.

What our armed insurrectionists ask for—what they have unwittingly sown—is destruction of the rule of law. This is of course deeply ironic, since gun-rights advocates insist that they represent, and bolster, law and order. They’ve never understood that men with assault rifles slung over camouflaged shoulders are the avatar of lawlessness.

Gun-rights extremists have thus lived in a fantasy world of looming insurrection, which politicians have happily cultivated when it has suited them.

This year has revealed all too well what insurrectionist fever dreams bring: In the spring, they delivered mobs who occupied state capitols and threatened legislators; in the summer, they led to dead protesters in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and Portland, Oregon; now they have wrought death and destruction in Congress. The gun-rights movement deserves a reckoning for this. Our leaders should do everything in their power to enact laws that ensure peaceful protest. We must ban assault rifles and open carry. Their legality is premised on ideas that are inimical to democracy itself.

 

 

de-adder-statue-of-liberty.jpg

 

 

You people are fucking whacked. The first step in the right direction would be an assault weapons ban and a ban on open carry.

 

 

Fuck off queer.

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3 minutes ago, LaughinAtLefty said:

No, it’s just straight up telling you and your anti-American ass to fuck off. I try to keep it simple for you dullards.

 

Nothing that you right-wing lunatics have been doing for the last 20 years is 'American'.

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2 hours ago, drvoke said:

 

text

 

 

You can't be trusted to act responsibly. You must be told what to do, in no uncertain terms.

 

 

The Gun-Rights Movement Fed America’s Insurrectionist Fever Dreams (msn.com)

(Full article at above link)

 

 

Much of the blame for last week’s horrific assault on the Capitol lies with the president and his allies; that much is clear. But another force in society has done more than its part, inculcating insurrectionist fantasies in the American mind for decades: the gun-rights movement.

Since the 1990s, the idea that Americans would need to band together and violently overthrow the government has been the key to establishing and expanding the market for guns. It has also been used to justify citizens’ right to march around in public with assault rifles slung casually over a shoulder or hoisted high at angry protests. The argument for self-defense only goes so far. If people want a gun to defend themselves and their family, then handguns will do.

  And a self-defense argument largely limits guns to the household; that’s where you would be most intent on protecting your family. This was not good enough for gun manufacturers eager to sell absurdly powerful firearms, such as semiautomatic rifles, which are properly at home on the battlefield.

After the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary, when a man slaughtered first graders with a semiautomatic rifle, the stage seemed set for an assault-rifle ban. The public-health case against them was strong: Semiautomatic rifles are designed to kill lots of people in a matter of seconds. They have no place in civil society.

But gun-rights advocates were busy making gun ownership about something else entirely: freedom—specifically freedom from incipient tyranny.

Conservative commentators echoed that message.

Andrew Napolitano, for example, quickly dismissed public-health and practical concerns over assault rifles: “Today, the limitations on the power and precision of the guns we can lawfully own … [assures] that a tyrant can more easily disarm and overcome us. It protects the right to shoot tyrants, and it protects the right to shoot at them effectively, with the same instruments they would use upon us.”

With arguments like these, the gun-rights movement cleared the path for insurrection. It blew a hole in the rule of law—and Donald Trump’s would-be soldiers clamored through it. And then scaled the walls of Congress.

What our armed insurrectionists ask for—what they have unwittingly sown—is destruction of the rule of law. This is of course deeply ironic, since gun-rights advocates insist that they represent, and bolster, law and order. They’ve never understood that men with assault rifles slung over camouflaged shoulders are the avatar of lawlessness.

Gun-rights extremists have thus lived in a fantasy world of looming insurrection, which politicians have happily cultivated when it has suited them.

This year has revealed all too well what insurrectionist fever dreams bring: In the spring, they delivered mobs who occupied state capitols and threatened legislators; in the summer, they led to dead protesters in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and Portland, Oregon; now they have wrought death and destruction in Congress. The gun-rights movement deserves a reckoning for this. Our leaders should do everything in their power to enact laws that ensure peaceful protest. We must ban assault rifles and open carry. Their legality is premised on ideas that are inimical to democracy itself.

 

 

de-adder-statue-of-liberty.jpg

 

 

You people are fucking whacked. The first step in the right direction would be an assault weapons ban and a ban on open carry.

 

 

 

And now the left is coming back for guns.

 

Yesterday it was free speech and now its the 2A. All this power grabing is a leftists wet deeam.

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2 minutes ago, Redoctober said:

 

And now the left is coming back for guns.

 

Yesterday it was free speech and now its the 2A. All this power grabing is a leftists wet deeam.

Well, when opportunity strikes....

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3 hours ago, drvoke said:

 

text

 

 

You can't be trusted to act responsibly. You must be told what to do, in no uncertain terms.

 

 

The Gun-Rights Movement Fed America’s Insurrectionist Fever Dreams (msn.com)

(Full article at above link)

 

 

Much of the blame for last week’s horrific assault on the Capitol lies with the president and his allies; that much is clear. But another force in society has done more than its part, inculcating insurrectionist fantasies in the American mind for decades: the gun-rights movement.

Since the 1990s, the idea that Americans would need to band together and violently overthrow the government has been the key to establishing and expanding the market for guns. It has also been used to justify citizens’ right to march around in public with assault rifles slung casually over a shoulder or hoisted high at angry protests. The argument for self-defense only goes so far. If people want a gun to defend themselves and their family, then handguns will do.

  And a self-defense argument largely limits guns to the household; that’s where you would be most intent on protecting your family. This was not good enough for gun manufacturers eager to sell absurdly powerful firearms, such as semiautomatic rifles, which are properly at home on the battlefield.

After the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary, when a man slaughtered first graders with a semiautomatic rifle, the stage seemed set for an assault-rifle ban. The public-health case against them was strong: Semiautomatic rifles are designed to kill lots of people in a matter of seconds. They have no place in civil society.

But gun-rights advocates were busy making gun ownership about something else entirely: freedom—specifically freedom from incipient tyranny.

Conservative commentators echoed that message.

Andrew Napolitano, for example, quickly dismissed public-health and practical concerns over assault rifles: “Today, the limitations on the power and precision of the guns we can lawfully own … [assures] that a tyrant can more easily disarm and overcome us. It protects the right to shoot tyrants, and it protects the right to shoot at them effectively, with the same instruments they would use upon us.”

With arguments like these, the gun-rights movement cleared the path for insurrection. It blew a hole in the rule of law—and Donald Trump’s would-be soldiers clamored through it. And then scaled the walls of Congress.

What our armed insurrectionists ask for—what they have unwittingly sown—is destruction of the rule of law. This is of course deeply ironic, since gun-rights advocates insist that they represent, and bolster, law and order. They’ve never understood that men with assault rifles slung over camouflaged shoulders are the avatar of lawlessness.

Gun-rights extremists have thus lived in a fantasy world of looming insurrection, which politicians have happily cultivated when it has suited them.

This year has revealed all too well what insurrectionist fever dreams bring: In the spring, they delivered mobs who occupied state capitols and threatened legislators; in the summer, they led to dead protesters in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and Portland, Oregon; now they have wrought death and destruction in Congress. The gun-rights movement deserves a reckoning for this. Our leaders should do everything in their power to enact laws that ensure peaceful protest. We must ban assault rifles and open carry. Their legality is premised on ideas that are inimical to democracy itself.

 

 

de-adder-statue-of-liberty.jpg

 

 

You people are fucking whacked. The first step in the right direction would be an assault weapons ban and a ban on open carry.

 

 

Sorry. Your weak attempt to violate our 2nd amendment rights is going lead to a REAL insurrection. 

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3 hours ago, drvoke said:

 

text

 

 

You can't be trusted to act responsibly. You must be told what to do, in no uncertain terms.

 

 

The Gun-Rights Movement Fed America’s Insurrectionist Fever Dreams (msn.com)

(Full article at above link)

 

 

Much of the blame for last week’s horrific assault on the Capitol lies with the president and his allies; that much is clear. But another force in society has done more than its part, inculcating insurrectionist fantasies in the American mind for decades: the gun-rights movement.

Since the 1990s, the idea that Americans would need to band together and violently overthrow the government has been the key to establishing and expanding the market for guns. It has also been used to justify citizens’ right to march around in public with assault rifles slung casually over a shoulder or hoisted high at angry protests. The argument for self-defense only goes so far. If people want a gun to defend themselves and their family, then handguns will do.

  And a self-defense argument largely limits guns to the household; that’s where you would be most intent on protecting your family. This was not good enough for gun manufacturers eager to sell absurdly powerful firearms, such as semiautomatic rifles, which are properly at home on the battlefield.

After the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary, when a man slaughtered first graders with a semiautomatic rifle, the stage seemed set for an assault-rifle ban. The public-health case against them was strong: Semiautomatic rifles are designed to kill lots of people in a matter of seconds. They have no place in civil society.

But gun-rights advocates were busy making gun ownership about something else entirely: freedom—specifically freedom from incipient tyranny.

Conservative commentators echoed that message.

Andrew Napolitano, for example, quickly dismissed public-health and practical concerns over assault rifles: “Today, the limitations on the power and precision of the guns we can lawfully own … [assures] that a tyrant can more easily disarm and overcome us. It protects the right to shoot tyrants, and it protects the right to shoot at them effectively, with the same instruments they would use upon us.”

With arguments like these, the gun-rights movement cleared the path for insurrection. It blew a hole in the rule of law—and Donald Trump’s would-be soldiers clamored through it. And then scaled the walls of Congress.

What our armed insurrectionists ask for—what they have unwittingly sown—is destruction of the rule of law. This is of course deeply ironic, since gun-rights advocates insist that they represent, and bolster, law and order. They’ve never understood that men with assault rifles slung over camouflaged shoulders are the avatar of lawlessness.

Gun-rights extremists have thus lived in a fantasy world of looming insurrection, which politicians have happily cultivated when it has suited them.

This year has revealed all too well what insurrectionist fever dreams bring: In the spring, they delivered mobs who occupied state capitols and threatened legislators; in the summer, they led to dead protesters in Kenosha, Wisconsin, and Portland, Oregon; now they have wrought death and destruction in Congress. The gun-rights movement deserves a reckoning for this. Our leaders should do everything in their power to enact laws that ensure peaceful protest. We must ban assault rifles and open carry. Their legality is premised on ideas that are inimical to democracy itself.

 

 

de-adder-statue-of-liberty.jpg

 

 

You people are fucking whacked. The first step in the right direction would be an assault weapons ban and a ban on open carry.

 

 

 

Yet all these people that showed up at the Capitol were unarmed ... like Liberals.

 

Interesting huh?

 

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