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Survivor of the Jonestown Massacre compares Trump to Jim Jones: ‘The rhetoric is so similar’


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It was 42 years ago, on November 18, 1978, that cult leader Jim Jones encouraged a mass suicide in Guyana — where more than 900 of his followers died after drinking Flavor-Aid (a drink similar to Kool-Aid) that had been laced with poison. KRON-TV in Northern California, on the 42nd anniversary of the Jonestown Massacre, discussed the tragedy with some of the survivors — and one of them compared Jones to President Donald Trump.

 

Jones’ cult, the People’s Temple, was founded in San Francisco, where he persuaded hundreds of his followers to join him in a settlement he set up in the South American country of Guyana — and he named that settlement, Jonestown, after himself. Yulanda Williams, a People’s Temple member, went to Jonestown with her husband and her one-year-old daughter. Williams, who avoided the Jonestown Massacre, explained to KRON why Trump reminds her so much of Jones.

 

Williams told KRON, “I sometimes listen to our commander in chief — he sounds so much (like him), and the rhetoric is so similar to that of Jim Jones. But it is absolutely eerie for me, and I think that over 240,000 people have lost their lives due to COVID. When we say Jonestown is the most tragic incident of a massacre of people, I say don’t forget about the commander in chief who is responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people.”

 

Williams believes that Trump has a cult-like appeal — and she compares deaths from COVID-19 in the United States to the Jonestown Massacre. Williams isn’t the only one who has compared Trump to Jim Jones. Attorney Paul Morantz, reflecting on the COVID-19 pandemic, made a Trump/Jones comparison in a scathing op-ed posted on his blog in July. Morantz has first-hand experience with cult members: in 1978, members of Synanon tried to kill the anti-cult attorney by placing a rattlesnake in his mailbox.

 

During the KRON interview, Williams recalled that after she arrived at Jonestown with members of her family, they were told to hand over their passports and their money.

 

“My husband looked at me, and I looked at him — we couldn’t say anything to each other but (realized) that a grave, grave mistake had been made,” Williams recalled.

 

In 1977, about a year before the Jonestown Massacre, Williams managed to convince Jones to let her family leave Jonestown.

Williams remembered, “People are being malnourished. People are being physically punished, verbally abused. There was consistent brainwashing going on because all day long and all night long when you try to sleep, all you would hear was him on the PA system yelling and screaming.”

 

Another People’s Temple member who lived to talk about the Jonestown Massacre was Pastor Hue Fortson. About two months before the Massacre, Fortson was ordered to leave Jonestown and return to San Francisco. But his wife and four-year-old son were not allowed to leave and died on November 18, 1978.

 

Fortson, 42 years later, told KRON, “I felt like I was less than two cents. I gave up on my parenting rights, I gave up on my husband rights. I gave up my rights just as a person because I believe this man had a better plan than myself — and it took time, it took prayer. It took me coming to a place of recognizing and realizing that I, like everybody else, I’m important in this world. I’m not an accident.”

Reports of abuses at Jonestown inspired the late Democratic Rep. Leo Ryan of California to fly to Guyana to investigate. Ryan was killed on November 18, 1978, but not by drinking poisoned Flavor-Aid. Rather, Ryan — along with three journalists and a People’s Temple member — was gunned down by Jones’ followers at an airstrip in Port Kaituma, Guyana. A Ryan aide, Democrat Jackie Speier, was shot five times during that ambush but survived. Speier, who is now 70, has been serving in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2008 and was reelected on November 3.

 

The Jonestown Massacre was so horrifying that the expression “drinking the Kool-Aid” has come to mean blindly accepting bad information and not questioning it.

 
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4 hours ago, benson13 said:

It was 42 years ago, on November 18, 1978, that cult leader Jim Jones encouraged a mass suicide in Guyana — where more than 900 of his followers died after drinking Flavor-Aid (a drink similar to Kool-Aid) that had been laced with poison. KRON-TV in Northern California, on the 42nd anniversary of the Jonestown Massacre, discussed the tragedy with some of the survivors — and one of them compared Jones to President Donald Trump.

 

Jones’ cult, the People’s Temple, was founded in San Francisco, where he persuaded hundreds of his followers to join him in a settlement he set up in the South American country of Guyana — and he named that settlement, Jonestown, after himself. Yulanda Williams, a People’s Temple member, went to Jonestown with her husband and her one-year-old daughter. Williams, who avoided the Jonestown Massacre, explained to KRON why Trump reminds her so much of Jones.

 

Williams told KRON, “I sometimes listen to our commander in chief — he sounds so much (like him), and the rhetoric is so similar to that of Jim Jones. But it is absolutely eerie for me, and I think that over 240,000 people have lost their lives due to COVID. When we say Jonestown is the most tragic incident of a massacre of people, I say don’t forget about the commander in chief who is responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people.”

 

Williams believes that Trump has a cult-like appeal — and she compares deaths from COVID-19 in the United States to the Jonestown Massacre. Williams isn’t the only one who has compared Trump to Jim Jones. Attorney Paul Morantz, reflecting on the COVID-19 pandemic, made a Trump/Jones comparison in a scathing op-ed posted on his blog in July. Morantz has first-hand experience with cult members: in 1978, members of Synanon tried to kill the anti-cult attorney by placing a rattlesnake in his mailbox.

 

During the KRON interview, Williams recalled that after she arrived at Jonestown with members of her family, they were told to hand over their passports and their money.

 

“My husband looked at me, and I looked at him — we couldn’t say anything to each other but (realized) that a grave, grave mistake had been made,” Williams recalled.

 

In 1977, about a year before the Jonestown Massacre, Williams managed to convince Jones to let her family leave Jonestown.

Williams remembered, “People are being malnourished. People are being physically punished, verbally abused. There was consistent brainwashing going on because all day long and all night long when you try to sleep, all you would hear was him on the PA system yelling and screaming.”

 

Another People’s Temple member who lived to talk about the Jonestown Massacre was Pastor Hue Fortson. About two months before the Massacre, Fortson was ordered to leave Jonestown and return to San Francisco. But his wife and four-year-old son were not allowed to leave and died on November 18, 1978.

 

Fortson, 42 years later, told KRON, “I felt like I was less than two cents. I gave up on my parenting rights, I gave up on my husband rights. I gave up my rights just as a person because I believe this man had a better plan than myself — and it took time, it took prayer. It took me coming to a place of recognizing and realizing that I, like everybody else, I’m important in this world. I’m not an accident.”

Reports of abuses at Jonestown inspired the late Democratic Rep. Leo Ryan of California to fly to Guyana to investigate. Ryan was killed on November 18, 1978, but not by drinking poisoned Flavor-Aid. Rather, Ryan — along with three journalists and a People’s Temple member — was gunned down by Jones’ followers at an airstrip in Port Kaituma, Guyana. A Ryan aide, Democrat Jackie Speier, was shot five times during that ambush but survived. Speier, who is now 70, has been serving in the U.S. House of Representatives since 2008 and was reelected on November 3.

 

The Jonestown Massacre was so horrifying that the expression “drinking the Kool-Aid” has come to mean blindly accepting bad information and not questioning it.

 

 

No one survived Jonestown ... fuck those liars.

 

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and Jim Jones told his GULLIBLE followers everyone was lying to them

 

 

 

Williams told KRON, “I sometimes listen to our commander in chief — he sounds so much (like him), and the rhetoric is so similar to that of Jim Jones. But it is absolutely eerie for me, and I think that over 240,000 people have lost their lives due to COVID. When we say Jonestown is the most tragic incident of a massacre of people, I say don’t forget about the commander in chief who is responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people.”

 

Williams believes that Trump has a cult-like appeal — and she compares deaths from COVID-19 in the United States to the Jonestown Massacre. Williams isn’t the only one who has compared Trump to Jim Jones. Attorney Paul Morantz, reflecting on the COVID-19 pandemic, made a Trump/Jones comparison in a scathing op-ed posted on his blog in July. Morantz has first-hand experience with cult members: in 1978, members of Synanon tried to kill the anti-cult attorney by placing a rattlesnake in his mailbox.

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1 minute ago, benson13 said:

The Jonestown Massacre was so horrifying that the expression “drinking the Kool-Aid” has come to mean blindly accepting bad information and not questioning it.

It was actually Flavor-Aid... but yeah, that's where the term came from.

 

It was also discovered that probably half or more of the dead didn't voluntarily take the poison, but we're forcefully injected with a syringe, and some people even died from gunshot wounds.

 

It was more of a mass murder, than a mass suicide.

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8 minutes ago, Z09 said:

Wasn't Jones a Democrat?

 

Yup!!!

 

Bay Area Democrats

Jones also was deeply plugged into the Bay Area and U.S. Democratic political establishments.

 

According to a 2012 article on Salon, a liberal website:

 

“Jim Jones, the strange and charismatic leader of Peoples Temple, proved a master at politically wiring San Francisco in the mid-1970s….

 

“Jones soon learned that his control over a well-organized, mixed-race army of some 8,000 dedicated followers gave him major stature with San Francisco’s liberal elite. Redevelopment had bulldozed the Fillmore’s political power into the ground. But now this strange white man with the hipster shades, Indian-black hair, and cadences of a black Bible-thumper seemed to be erecting a new political power line into the rubble-strewn, crime-ridden no-man’s-land. Jones could be counted on to deliver busloads of obedient, well-dressed disciples to demonstrations, campaign rallies, and political precincts. The city’s liberal Burton machine — run by congressional powerhouse Phil Burton — quickly identified the Peoples Temple juggernaut as a potentially game-changing ally in its long battle to take over city hall.

 

“It was Burton ally Willie Brown – a rising force in California’s state capital — who first recognized that Jones’s organization could play a pivotal role in his friend George Moscone’s run for mayor….

 

“In the December runoff between Moscone and [conservative Republican John] Barbagelata, Peoples Temple went even further to secure victory for its candidate. On the eve of the election, Jones filled buses with temple members in Redwood Valley and Los Angeles and shuttled them to San Francisco. Security at polling places was lax on Election Day, and many nonresidents were able to cast their ballots for Moscone, some more than once. ‘You could have run around to 1200 precincts and voted 1200 times,’ said a bitter Barbagelata later, after losing by a whisper of a margin. But he was not the only one who claimed that the Peoples Temple stole the election for George Moscone. Temple leaders also claimed credit.

 

“Moscone at first tried to appease him with a harmless post on the human rights commission. But the temple leader insisted on a position that had more clout, and the mayor decided he was in no position to alienate Jones. In October 1976 Moscone announced that he was naming Jones to the San Francisco Housing Authority, which oversees the operation of the city’s public housing. The agency, the largest landlord in the city, was a notorious maze of corruption, and it provided Jones’s organization with ample opportunity for shady self-dealing. A few months later, Moscone pulled strings to promote Jones, making him chairman….”

 

 

 

AND just like ALL THESE SHITSTAINS, he was a SOCIALIST DEMONCRAP!!! Wanted to provided 100% Womb to Tomb free shit and thought he could do it out of nation where the LEGAL EAGLES couldn't arrest him for raping little 12 year olds!!

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20 hours ago, benson13 said:
 

Williams told KRON, “I sometimes listen to our commander in chief — he sounds so much (like him), and the rhetoric is so similar to that of Jim Jones. But it is absolutely eerie for me, and I think that over 240,000 people have lost their lives due to COVID. When we say Jonestown is the most tragic incident of a massacre of people, I say don’t forget about the commander in chief who is responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people.”


 

😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂

 

Now THATi is some TDS right there. Trump responsible for Cuomo sending Covid patients back to nursing homes? That’s some funny s**t. 
 

Thanks Benson. You find some of the funniest articles that I would never see without you taking the time to post them here. 🤣

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1 hour ago, MidnightMax said:

 

Yup!!!

 

Bay Area Democrats

Jones also was deeply plugged into the Bay Area and U.S. Democratic political establishments.

 

According to a 2012 article on Salon, a liberal website:

 

“Jim Jones, the strange and charismatic leader of Peoples Temple, proved a master at politically wiring San Francisco in the mid-1970s….

 

“Jones soon learned that his control over a well-organized, mixed-race army of some 8,000 dedicated followers gave him major stature with San Francisco’s liberal elite. Redevelopment had bulldozed the Fillmore’s political power into the ground. But now this strange white man with the hipster shades, Indian-black hair, and cadences of a black Bible-thumper seemed to be erecting a new political power line into the rubble-strewn, crime-ridden no-man’s-land. Jones could be counted on to deliver busloads of obedient, well-dressed disciples to demonstrations, campaign rallies, and political precincts. The city’s liberal Burton machine — run by congressional powerhouse Phil Burton — quickly identified the Peoples Temple juggernaut as a potentially game-changing ally in its long battle to take over city hall.

 

“It was Burton ally Willie Brown – a rising force in California’s state capital — who first recognized that Jones’s organization could play a pivotal role in his friend George Moscone’s run for mayor….

 

“In the December runoff between Moscone and [conservative Republican John] Barbagelata, Peoples Temple went even further to secure victory for its candidate. On the eve of the election, Jones filled buses with temple members in Redwood Valley and Los Angeles and shuttled them to San Francisco. Security at polling places was lax on Election Day, and many nonresidents were able to cast their ballots for Moscone, some more than once. ‘You could have run around to 1200 precincts and voted 1200 times,’ said a bitter Barbagelata later, after losing by a whisper of a margin. But he was not the only one who claimed that the Peoples Temple stole the election for George Moscone. Temple leaders also claimed credit.

 

“Moscone at first tried to appease him with a harmless post on the human rights commission. But the temple leader insisted on a position that had more clout, and the mayor decided he was in no position to alienate Jones. In October 1976 Moscone announced that he was naming Jones to the San Francisco Housing Authority, which oversees the operation of the city’s public housing. The agency, the largest landlord in the city, was a notorious maze of corruption, and it provided Jones’s organization with ample opportunity for shady self-dealing. A few months later, Moscone pulled strings to promote Jones, making him chairman….”

 

 

 

AND just like ALL THESE SHITSTAINS, he was a SOCIALIST DEMONCRAP!!! Wanted to provided 100% Womb to Tomb free shit and thought he could do it out of nation where the LEGAL EAGLES couldn't arrest him for raping little 12 year olds!!


Benson ran face first into that brick wall. It’s a wonder Bernie wasn’t rolled up in that west coast cult. 

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10 minutes ago, Toldya said:

 

But he was also a cult leader, which makes him more like Trump.

 

When SHITSTAINS like you try every derogatory means possible to denigrate other Americans because you disagree with them, isn't going to get you anywhere BUT DEAD from that CIVIL WAR you so desperately want to start.

 

So PLEASE, don't start this "Unity" BULLSHIT when what you REALLY WANT is for the CONSERVATIVES to kowtow to your demands.


FUCK YOU AND WHEN THE SHOOTING STARTS, you should really try to hide the best you can because WE WILL FIND YOU!!!

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