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Did the Big Bang occur in Deep Space?


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No one knows what was before the singularity. But what we can say, with certainty, is what there was, was nothing. What that means is that the universe as we know it came from nothing.

 

It's difficult for human beings to wrap their mind around the concept that nothing is actually something. But it's really not that difficult if you understand exactly what nothing is because nothing is certainly something in this discussion.

 

Nothing is simply the absence of space-time. Beyond that description is what we don't know. We also don't know what caused the eruption of our universe to form space time. Some suspect and I certainly agree that it was a random occurrence.

 

What we know is that the Universe creates its own space-time as it expands. And we can certainly surmise that our universe exists within a sea of that nothingness.

 

What else exists in the nothingness? Could there be other universes in there? Possibly, but we will never know. What parameters or laws exist in the nothingness? Again, we will never know but there must be some principles or laws or there wouldn't have been a random fluctuation to cause eruption of our universe to create its own space-time.

 

So maybe our universe carries with it a little bit of the nothingness' characteristics... But probably only at the quantum level.

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10 minutes ago, 1AC said:

No one knows what was before the singularity. But what we can say, with certainty, is what there was, was nothing. What that means is that the universe as we know it came from nothing.

 

It's difficult for human beings to wrap their mind around the concept that nothing is actually something. But it's really not that difficult if you understand exactly what nothing is because nothing is certainly something in this discussion.

 

Nothing is simply the absence of space-time. Beyond that description is what we don't know. We also don't know what caused the eruption of our universe to form space time. Some suspect and I certainly agree that it was a random occurrence.

 

What we know is that the Universe creates its own space-time as it expands. And we can certainly surmise that our universe exists within a sea of that nothingness.

 

What else exists in the nothingness? Could there be other universes in there? Possibly, but we will never know. What parameters or laws exist in the nothingness? Again, we will never know but there must be some principles or laws or there wouldn't have been a random fluctuation to cause eruption of our universe to create its own space-time.

 

So maybe our universe carries with it a little bit of the nothingness' characteristics... But maybe only at the quantum level.

Everything we know about the universe so far is just theory and speculation,  every decade or so humanity is gifted with a brilliant mind who continues on trying to solve these mysteries.  

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5 minutes ago, lucifershammer said:

Everything we know about the universe so far is just theory and speculation,  every decade or so humanity is gifted with a brilliant mind who continues on trying to solve these mysteries.  

Not true... while there are many things we don't know there are just as many things we do. For instance there are certain principles or laws of physics in this universe that always have been and never will change no matter how smart we get or technologically-advanced we become. That's why we call them laws or principles because nothing we can do can change them. The laws of thermodynamics for instance. The speed of light another and Heisenberg's uncertainty principle. These are not theories. They are the nature of the universe. They are constant they always have been and they always will be as long as our universe exists.

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14 hours ago, kfools said:

I agree. Move it to NHB

 

I only resumed his answers to my questions, while posing a new one.

I don't feel I lost at all, but you're the boss.

.

And the post from Squatchman above ... is within the rules?

 

ROFLMAO

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8 hours ago, deezer shoove said:

If nothing existed before the Big Bang, then there wasn't any "deep space" either.

 

Well, that was the point I was driving to.

My words.

 

We can even take it a step deeper:

 

8 hours ago, deezer shoove said:

If   nothing existed   before the Big Bang ...

 

Nothing did indeed exist before the Big Bang.

So, how did  "nothing" get to be ?

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On 6/20/2020 at 5:08 PM, Johnnie said:

Yes or no ?

If if did occur, it had to be in deep space, as that is all there was at the time?

It cannot be proven, of course. At most there is speculation that it occurred based on the position and nature of what exists in the Universe today.

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On 6/20/2020 at 5:08 PM, Johnnie said:

Did the Big Bang occur in Deep Space?

Yes or no ?

No. 

 

If the Big Bang did in fact happen, it happened from a singularity, one which was not in space-time, but which contained what was to become our space-time.  Therefore, the Big Bang did not, could not, occur in "Deep Space". 

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8 minutes ago, Johnnie said:

 

Well, that was the point I was driving to.

My words.

 

We can even take it a step deeper:

 

 

Nothing did indeed exist before the Big Bang.

So, how did  "nothing" get to be ?

In the beginning, there was large amount of nothing, but within it, there was a very, very compact blob of something that acquired a bit more mass and then exploded, causing the Big Bang.

That is the best explanation to date for the origin of the Universe, but there is still a lot we do not know about much of what is in the Universe, such as Dark Matter and altimatter.

 Something cannot come from nothing.

 

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4 hours ago, 1AC said:

No one knows what was before the singularity. But what we can say, with certainty, is what there was, was nothing. What that means is that the universe as we know it came from nothing.

 

It's difficult for human beings to wrap their mind around the concept that nothing is actually something. But it's really not that difficult if you understand exactly what nothing is because nothing is certainly something in this discussion.

 

Nothing is simply the absence of space-time. Beyond that description is what we don't know. We also don't know what caused the eruption of our universe to form space time. Some suspect and I certainly agree that it was a random occurrence.

 

What we know is that the Universe creates its own space-time as it expands. And we can certainly surmise that our universe exists within a sea of that nothingness.

 

What else exists in the nothingness? Could there be other universes in there? Possibly, but we will never know. What parameters or laws exist in the nothingness? Again, we will never know but there must be some principles or laws or there wouldn't have been a random fluctuation to cause eruption of our universe to create its own space-time.

 

So maybe our universe carries with it a little bit of the nothingness' characteristics... But probably only at the quantum level.

 

WwowW

 

That's the closest assumption I ever heard to my own convictions.

It's fine to know there're folks out there who think along my own line.

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4 hours ago, AnotherJim said:

 If your far enough from the Milky Way, wouldn't we be in deep space?

I think that Deep Space is essentially a word used to indicate a place that is so far from any celestial bodies it is not affected by the gravity of any of them. In Sci-Fi, bases are either in orbit around some planet or star or they are in deep space.

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2 minutes ago, XavierOnassis said:

In the beginning, there was large amount of nothing, but within it, there was a very, very compact blob of something that acquired a bit more mass and then exploded, causing the Big Bang.

 Something cannot come from nothing.

What you describe is not at all part of any Big Bang theory.  Because:

1.  The term "in the beginning" is a non-starter because this implies the existence of time, and time did not exist.

2.  Whether there was "nothing" is not known;

3.  Only in our own space-time does it make sense to say a "large amount of nothing", which actually does not exclude the fabric of space-time.  But, prior to the Big-Bang, your statement is nonsense.

4.  The Big Bang theory says that everything came from a singularity.  What was before this singularity is impossible to know.  Notwithstanding this, in quantum mechanics, there are instances where particles appear from nothing.

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8 minutes ago, Skans said:

it happened from a singularity,

 

So, where was that  "singularity" situated, when it happened?

 

Keep it general, no need for longitude and latitude _ universe-wise speaking.

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Just now, Johnnie said:

 

So, where was that  "singularity" situated, when it happened?

 

Keep it general, no need for longitude and latitude _ universe-wise speaking.

Not in space.  Certainly not in "Deep Space".  Space was created as part of the Big Bang.  Beyond that, I don't know.  No one does. 

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4 minutes ago, XavierOnassis said:

I think that Deep Space is essentially a word used to indicate a place that is so far from any celestial bodies it is not affected by the gravity of any of them. In Sci-Fi, bases are either in orbit around some planet or star or they are in deep space.

There is gravity even in deep space Far From Any celestial bodies.

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The idea of the Big Bang seems to be there is a finite amount of matter and  that can be concentrated together. When that amount is exceeded a critical mass exists and there is an explosion. 

 

I see it as a cup that you are filling with water. You can fill it up to the rim and add one drop at a time until the surface tension is inadequate to hold it in and it overflows.

Or you could see it as this Monty Python scene.

 

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11 minutes ago, XavierOnassis said:

In the beginning, there was large amount of nothing, but within it, there was a very, very compact blob of something that acquired a bit more mass and then exploded, causing the Big Bang.

That is the best explanation to date for the origin of the Universe, but there is still a lot we do not know about much of what is in the Universe, such as Dark Matter and altimatter.

 Something cannot come from nothing.

 

Incorrect I just showed where something can come from nothing... And that nothing is something. Nothing is merely the non-existence of space-time. The problem is you people keep trying to explain something in terms based on the way you view your world... And you cannot apply those same parameters to what existed before the universe.

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2 minutes ago, XavierOnassis said:

The idea of the Big Bang seems to be there is a finite amount of matter and  that can be concentrated together. When that amount is exceeded a critical mass exists and there is an explosion. 

 

I see it as a cup that you are filling with water. Yu can fill it up to the rim and add one drop at a time until the surface tension is inadequate to hold it in and it overflows.

Or you could see it as this Monty Python scene.

 

 you are using terminology without any idea of what it means that is not what critical mass is.

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