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BLM has been a big boost for Trump's campaign.  Democrats are dumb.

BLM is a fraud. Tell em' All Lives Matter, and the leftist dipshits lose their mind. It's a political agenda, nothing more, nothing less.   If black lives mattered, this racist asshats would

The reason we are upset is because of the rioting. Blacks do get treated unfairly by police and the justice department. Everyone 100% agrees. Trump has been freeing blacks from prison at a rapid rate

4 hours ago, pwkbirdie56 said:

I cannot wait for the debates between King Donny and Biden.  

 

You'll be waiting until hell freezes, over, yes because the Dem Party has acknowledged the theorem [after several months of proven-hypotheses] that Biden is not mentally-fit to debate any humans, without him embarrassing the Dem Party and their 2020-'24 frontier. Just yesterday, his dementia came to haunt him/caused him to once again insult his own negro voters in here.

 

You'll see.

 

Each of the planned debates will soon have a reason, in real time, for why it simply cannot occur PLUS those real time reasons will never ever be Biden-related and you can trust that.

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On 6/17/2020 at 7:43 PM, Str8tEdge said:

Most whites I know have had enough of being demonized, victimized, guilted and attacked due to their skin color. 

 

The BLM movement may be the tide that ensures another 4 years of the orangeman. 

 

You can't fight racism with racism, violence with violence and stupidity with stupidity. 

 

BLM has become the monster they claim to fight. 

 

 

you cant fight it with reparations paychecks, either.....

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30 minutes ago, jacktheripper said:

you cant fight it with reparations paychecks, either.....

Well no. They already spend their full refund and EITC on smart phones and sneakers anyway. 

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On 8/6/2020 at 7:07 PM, pwkbirdie56 said:

What about the white folks supporting BLM?  Guess you neo cons think they have been brainwashed?

  YUP, by the leftist/communists.  BLM fits right into the communist agenda (make the country ungovernable).

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On 8/7/2020 at 2:33 AM, pwkbirdie56 said:

I cannot wait for the debates between King Donny and Biden.  Trump will get crushed in the debates. Better get plenty of hot buttered popcorn. 

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA.                                 :)  :)  :)

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20 hours ago, Str8tEdge said:

Well no. They already spend their full refund and EITC on smart phones and sneakers anyway. 

 

Ravist, stereotypical remarks like this, is why your brain has no ability to acknowledge systematic racism. iow

 

For the millions who did not spend their refund on smart phones/sneakers, you will not apologize and admit that you don't know what the f*ck you are talking about LOL

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21 hours ago, jacktheripper said:

you cant fight it with reparations paychecks, either.....

 

We will never know, until it is tried.

 

So far, the reparations checks have worked to "fight it" for every group we gave reparations to so far. But hey, they were not darkskinned humans, so we had no problem reparating them.

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3 hours ago, pmurT said:

 

Ravist, stereotypical remarks like this, is why your brain has no ability to acknowledge systematic racism. iow

 

For the millions who did not spend their refund on smart phones/sneakers, you will not apologize and admit that you don't know what the f*ck you are talking about LOL

You haven’t been to the mall around refund check time, have you. 😆

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On 8/10/2020 at 9:23 PM, pmurT said:

 

We will never know, until it is tried.

 

So far, the reparations checks have worked to "fight it" for every group we gave reparations to so far. But hey, they were not darkskinned humans, so we had no problem reparating them.

could you please give one example, because i have no idea what the hell you are referring to.....

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On 6/17/2020 at 7:43 PM, Str8tEdge said:

Most whites I know have had enough of being demonized, victimized, guilted and attacked due to their skin color. 

 

The BLM movement may be the tide that ensures another 4 years of the orangeman. 

 

You can't fight racism with racism, violence with violence and stupidity with stupidity. 

 

BLM has become the monster they claim to fight. 

 

 

BLM has been a big boost for Trump's campaign.  Democrats are dumb.

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On 8/12/2020 at 3:35 AM, jacktheripper said:

could you please give one example, because i have no idea what the hell you are referring to.....

 

I'll tell you what ... how about I give you, many examples, then you will not make any mistakes within your idea of what the hell I am referring to...Fair? 

 

Six times victims have received reparations — including four in the US

 

Ronald Reagan signs the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, establishing reparations for victims of Japanese internment, into law. Ronald Reagan signs the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, establishing reparations for victims of Japanese internment, into law.  Photo courtesy of the Courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.

 

Ta-Nehisi Coates' long, deeply researched and beautifully written case for reparations to African-Americans for slavery and Jim Crow has ignited a long dormant conversation about what, exactly, the US government owes to a population it abused for centuries, and which still faces pervasive discrimination and economic disadvantage to this day.

 

In thinking about how an American reparations program would be structured, it's helpful to review the unfortunately rare instances when historical injustices actually were addressed through reparations. It's important to distinguish between reparations that go directly to individuals and families affected from those that go to the treasury of a victimized country.

 

The latter has been a common practice for millennia; Rome demanded payment from Carthage after the first two Punic Wars, the Axis powers paid war reparations after both World Wars, and Iraq is still paying off its reparations to Kuwait. But that's a very different phenomenon from what Coates is proposing; while Germany paid significant reparations to the Soviet Union after the second World War, it's unlikely any victims of Nazi war crimes during the war actually saw that money.

 

The six clearest antecedent programs are those set up by Germany to compensate victims of the Holocaust, by South Africa to compensate victims of apartheid, by the US to compensate victims of Japanese internment during World War II, by the state of North Carolina to compensate victims of its forced sterilization programs in the mid-20th century, by the federal government to compensate victims of the Tuskegee experiment, and by Florida to compensate victims of the Rosewood race riot of 1923.

The Holocaust

The closest analogue to reparations for slavery and Jim Crow is probably the reparations that West Germany agreed to pay after the Holocaust. A major component was the $7 billion (2014 dollars) West Germany agreed to give to the then-young state of Israel.

Coates goes into the Israeli debate around the reparations in some detail; Menachem Begin, then the leader of Israel's conservative opposition and later its first right-of-center prime minister, opposed the deal on the grounds that it appeared to forgive Germany in exchange for money. But the deal eventually went through, and the consequences for Israel's well-being were astounding. Here's Coates:

"By the end of 1961, these reparations vessels constituted two-thirds of the Israeli merchant fleet," writes the Israeli historian Tom Segev in his book The Seventh Million. "From 1953 to 1963, the reparations money funded about a third of the total investment in Israel’s electrical system, which tripled its capacity, and nearly half the total investment in the railways."

Israel’s GNP tripled during the 12 years of the agreement. The Bank of Israel attributed 15 percent of this growth, along with 45,000 jobs, to investments made with reparations money.

But that was actually a tiny fraction of Germany's total reparations payments, which totaled nearly $89 billion as of 2012, and largely went to individual survivors. The terms of the reparations, most of which are negotiated by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (which negotiated about $70 billion of the total), are constantly evolving, with some payments made on a one-time basis and others as monthly pensions of varying amounts. The Conference has a good breakdown of the various funds, and how much they've paid out, here.

 

In 2005, an Israeli government report put the economic cost of the Holocaust — in terms of lost income, unpaid wages, and seized property — at somewhere between $240 billion and $320 billion. Even the extensive reparation efforts undertaken to date do not come close to equalling that. Obviously, further compensation for the loss of loved ones and pain and suffering incurred would push that figure much, much higher.

Apartheid

One of the duties of South Africa's post-apartheid Truth and Reconciliation Commission, besides investigating human rights abuses committed by the apartheid government, was recommending reparations and other policies to redress those abuses and aid victims of the former regime.

The commission recommended about $360 million in reparations, to be distributed in six annual payments to victims identified by the Commission, but in 2003 president Thabo Mbeki announced in 2003 that he would authorize only $85 billion, to be given in one-time payments of $3,900 (above the average annual salary in the country at that time). The recipients numbered 16,397 as of 2012, a tiny fraction of the actual number of people victimized by the regime.

Japanese internment

The forced internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans in camps during World War II resulted in about $3.1 billion in property loss and $6.4 billion in income loss, in 2014 dollars. If you account for the possibility that that money might have been invested and gotten above-inflation returns, the economic losses are even larger.

 

Congress made two attempts at reparations, the Japanese-American Claims Act of 1948 and the Civil Liberties Act of 1988. Between 1948 and 1965, the former authorized payments totaling $38 million (which comes to somewhere between $286 to $374 million in 2014 dollars), which didn't come close to matching the economic loss.

 

The latter offered survivors $20,000 each in reparations. By 1998, 80,000 survivors had collected their share, for a total payout of $1.6 billion (between $2.3 billion and $3.2 billion today). There is no accounting by which either measure adequately repaid internees for their economic losses, let alone compensated for pain and suffering.

Forced sterilization

Most Americans states practiced one or another form of eugenics during the 20th century, with forced sterilizations of "unfit" people being a prime instrument. The targets were largely but by no means entirely mentally or developmentally disabled; poor black women on welfare were especially likely to be victimized in this manner.

 

The Supreme Court gave the practice a green light with 1927's Buck v. Bell, and eventually 33 states adopted the practice, forcibly sterilizing about 65,000 people total through the 1970s. Oregon forcibly sterilized people as late as 1981, and its Board of Eugenics (renamed the "Board of Social Protection" in 1967) was only abolished in 1983.

 

Very few states have acknowledged or apologized for these policies, and only one, North Carolina, has set up a reparations program. The state sterilized about 7,600 people, most of whom are no longer living, but last year passed a $10 million reparations program that should give the more than 177 living victims somewhere in the range of $50,000 each.

 

The payments should be made within a few years. Some victims have objected, saying this doesn't come close to remedying the injustice. As one victim, Elaine Riddick Jessie (who was sterilized at age 14 after being raped and giving the resulting son up for adoption), put it, "If I accepted it, what kind of value am I putting on my life?"

California, which sterilized by far the largest number of people of any state, has yet to pay out reparations.

Tuskegee experiment

After the end of the Tuskegee experiment — in which 399 black men with syphilis were left untreated to study the progression of the disease between 1932 and 1972 — the government reached a $10 million out of court settlement with the victims and their families in 1974, which included both monetary reparations (in 2014 dollars, $178,000 for men in the study who had syphilis, $72,000 for heirs, $77,000 for those in the control group and $24,000 for heirs of those in the control group) and a promise of lifelong medical treatment for both participants and their immediate families. According to the CDC, 15 descendants are still receiving treatment through the program today.

Rosewood

In 1923, the primarily black town of Rosewood on the Gulf Coast of Florida was destroyed in a race riot that, by official counts, killed at least six black residents and two whites (though some descendants of the town's residents have claimed many more were killed and dumped in mass graves). In 1994, the state of Florida agreed to a reparations package worth around $3.36 million in 2014 dollars, of which $2.4 million today would be set aside to compensate the 11 or so remaining survivors of the incident, $800,000 to compensate those who were forced to flee the town, and $160,000 would go to college scholarships primarily aimed at descendants.

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6 hours ago, pmurT said:

 

I'll tell you what ... how about I give you, many examples, then you will not make any mistakes within your idea of what the hell I am referring to...Fair? 

 

Six times victims have received reparations — including four in the US

 

Ronald Reagan signs the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, establishing reparations for victims of Japanese internment, into law. Ronald Reagan signs the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, establishing reparations for victims of Japanese internment, into law.  Photo courtesy of the Courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.

 

Ta-Nehisi Coates' long, deeply researched and beautifully written case for reparations to African-Americans for slavery and Jim Crow has ignited a long dormant conversation about what, exactly, the US government owes to a population it abused for centuries, and which still faces pervasive discrimination and economic disadvantage to this day.

 

In thinking about how an American reparations program would be structured, it's helpful to review the unfortunately rare instances when historical injustices actually were addressed through reparations. It's important to distinguish between reparations that go directly to individuals and families affected from those that go to the treasury of a victimized country.

 

The latter has been a common practice for millennia; Rome demanded payment from Carthage after the first two Punic Wars, the Axis powers paid war reparations after both World Wars, and Iraq is still paying off its reparations to Kuwait. But that's a very different phenomenon from what Coates is proposing; while Germany paid significant reparations to the Soviet Union after the second World War, it's unlikely any victims of Nazi war crimes during the war actually saw that money.

 

The six clearest antecedent programs are those set up by Germany to compensate victims of the Holocaust, by South Africa to compensate victims of apartheid, by the US to compensate victims of Japanese internment during World War II, by the state of North Carolina to compensate victims of its forced sterilization programs in the mid-20th century, by the federal government to compensate victims of the Tuskegee experiment, and by Florida to compensate victims of the Rosewood race riot of 1923.

The Holocaust

The closest analogue to reparations for slavery and Jim Crow is probably the reparations that West Germany agreed to pay after the Holocaust. A major component was the $7 billion (2014 dollars) West Germany agreed to give to the then-young state of Israel.

Coates goes into the Israeli debate around the reparations in some detail; Menachem Begin, then the leader of Israel's conservative opposition and later its first right-of-center prime minister, opposed the deal on the grounds that it appeared to forgive Germany in exchange for money. But the deal eventually went through, and the consequences for Israel's well-being were astounding. Here's Coates:

"By the end of 1961, these reparations vessels constituted two-thirds of the Israeli merchant fleet," writes the Israeli historian Tom Segev in his book The Seventh Million. "From 1953 to 1963, the reparations money funded about a third of the total investment in Israel’s electrical system, which tripled its capacity, and nearly half the total investment in the railways."

Israel’s GNP tripled during the 12 years of the agreement. The Bank of Israel attributed 15 percent of this growth, along with 45,000 jobs, to investments made with reparations money.

But that was actually a tiny fraction of Germany's total reparations payments, which totaled nearly $89 billion as of 2012, and largely went to individual survivors. The terms of the reparations, most of which are negotiated by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (which negotiated about $70 billion of the total), are constantly evolving, with some payments made on a one-time basis and others as monthly pensions of varying amounts. The Conference has a good breakdown of the various funds, and how much they've paid out, here.

 

In 2005, an Israeli government report put the economic cost of the Holocaust — in terms of lost income, unpaid wages, and seized property — at somewhere between $240 billion and $320 billion. Even the extensive reparation efforts undertaken to date do not come close to equalling that. Obviously, further compensation for the loss of loved ones and pain and suffering incurred would push that figure much, much higher.

Apartheid

One of the duties of South Africa's post-apartheid Truth and Reconciliation Commission, besides investigating human rights abuses committed by the apartheid government, was recommending reparations and other policies to redress those abuses and aid victims of the former regime.

The commission recommended about $360 million in reparations, to be distributed in six annual payments to victims identified by the Commission, but in 2003 president Thabo Mbeki announced in 2003 that he would authorize only $85 billion, to be given in one-time payments of $3,900 (above the average annual salary in the country at that time). The recipients numbered 16,397 as of 2012, a tiny fraction of the actual number of people victimized by the regime.

Japanese internment

The forced internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans in camps during World War II resulted in about $3.1 billion in property loss and $6.4 billion in income loss, in 2014 dollars. If you account for the possibility that that money might have been invested and gotten above-inflation returns, the economic losses are even larger.

 

Congress made two attempts at reparations, the Japanese-American Claims Act of 1948 and the Civil Liberties Act of 1988. Between 1948 and 1965, the former authorized payments totaling $38 million (which comes to somewhere between $286 to $374 million in 2014 dollars), which didn't come close to matching the economic loss.

 

The latter offered survivors $20,000 each in reparations. By 1998, 80,000 survivors had collected their share, for a total payout of $1.6 billion (between $2.3 billion and $3.2 billion today). There is no accounting by which either measure adequately repaid internees for their economic losses, let alone compensated for pain and suffering.

Forced sterilization

Most Americans states practiced one or another form of eugenics during the 20th century, with forced sterilizations of "unfit" people being a prime instrument. The targets were largely but by no means entirely mentally or developmentally disabled; poor black women on welfare were especially likely to be victimized in this manner.

 

The Supreme Court gave the practice a green light with 1927's Buck v. Bell, and eventually 33 states adopted the practice, forcibly sterilizing about 65,000 people total through the 1970s. Oregon forcibly sterilized people as late as 1981, and its Board of Eugenics (renamed the "Board of Social Protection" in 1967) was only abolished in 1983.

 

Very few states have acknowledged or apologized for these policies, and only one, North Carolina, has set up a reparations program. The state sterilized about 7,600 people, most of whom are no longer living, but last year passed a $10 million reparations program that should give the more than 177 living victims somewhere in the range of $50,000 each.

 

The payments should be made within a few years. Some victims have objected, saying this doesn't come close to remedying the injustice. As one victim, Elaine Riddick Jessie (who was sterilized at age 14 after being raped and giving the resulting son up for adoption), put it, "If I accepted it, what kind of value am I putting on my life?"

California, which sterilized by far the largest number of people of any state, has yet to pay out reparations.

Tuskegee experiment

After the end of the Tuskegee experiment — in which 399 black men with syphilis were left untreated to study the progression of the disease between 1932 and 1972 — the government reached a $10 million out of court settlement with the victims and their families in 1974, which included both monetary reparations (in 2014 dollars, $178,000 for men in the study who had syphilis, $72,000 for heirs, $77,000 for those in the control group and $24,000 for heirs of those in the control group) and a promise of lifelong medical treatment for both participants and their immediate families. According to the CDC, 15 descendants are still receiving treatment through the program today.

Rosewood

In 1923, the primarily black town of Rosewood on the Gulf Coast of Florida was destroyed in a race riot that, by official counts, killed at least six black residents and two whites (though some descendants of the town's residents have claimed many more were killed and dumped in mass graves). In 1994, the state of Florida agreed to a reparations package worth around $3.36 million in 2014 dollars, of which $2.4 million today would be set aside to compensate the 11 or so remaining survivors of the incident, $800,000 to compensate those who were forced to flee the town, and $160,000 would go to college scholarships primarily aimed at descendants.

 

6 hours ago, pmurT said:

 

I'll tell you what ... how about I give you, many examples, then you will not make any mistakes within your idea of what the hell I am referring to...Fair? 

 

Six times victims have received reparations — including four in the US

 

Ronald Reagan signs the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, establishing reparations for victims of Japanese internment, into law. Ronald Reagan signs the Civil Liberties Act of 1988, establishing reparations for victims of Japanese internment, into law.  Photo courtesy of the Courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.

 

Ta-Nehisi Coates' long, deeply researched and beautifully written case for reparations to African-Americans for slavery and Jim Crow has ignited a long dormant conversation about what, exactly, the US government owes to a population it abused for centuries, and which still faces pervasive discrimination and economic disadvantage to this day.

 

In thinking about how an American reparations program would be structured, it's helpful to review the unfortunately rare instances when historical injustices actually were addressed through reparations. It's important to distinguish between reparations that go directly to individuals and families affected from those that go to the treasury of a victimized country.

 

The latter has been a common practice for millennia; Rome demanded payment from Carthage after the first two Punic Wars, the Axis powers paid war reparations after both World Wars, and Iraq is still paying off its reparations to Kuwait. But that's a very different phenomenon from what Coates is proposing; while Germany paid significant reparations to the Soviet Union after the second World War, it's unlikely any victims of Nazi war crimes during the war actually saw that money.

 

The six clearest antecedent programs are those set up by Germany to compensate victims of the Holocaust, by South Africa to compensate victims of apartheid, by the US to compensate victims of Japanese internment during World War II, by the state of North Carolina to compensate victims of its forced sterilization programs in the mid-20th century, by the federal government to compensate victims of the Tuskegee experiment, and by Florida to compensate victims of the Rosewood race riot of 1923.

The Holocaust

The closest analogue to reparations for slavery and Jim Crow is probably the reparations that West Germany agreed to pay after the Holocaust. A major component was the $7 billion (2014 dollars) West Germany agreed to give to the then-young state of Israel.

Coates goes into the Israeli debate around the reparations in some detail; Menachem Begin, then the leader of Israel's conservative opposition and later its first right-of-center prime minister, opposed the deal on the grounds that it appeared to forgive Germany in exchange for money. But the deal eventually went through, and the consequences for Israel's well-being were astounding. Here's Coates:

"By the end of 1961, these reparations vessels constituted two-thirds of the Israeli merchant fleet," writes the Israeli historian Tom Segev in his book The Seventh Million. "From 1953 to 1963, the reparations money funded about a third of the total investment in Israel’s electrical system, which tripled its capacity, and nearly half the total investment in the railways."

Israel’s GNP tripled during the 12 years of the agreement. The Bank of Israel attributed 15 percent of this growth, along with 45,000 jobs, to investments made with reparations money.

But that was actually a tiny fraction of Germany's total reparations payments, which totaled nearly $89 billion as of 2012, and largely went to individual survivors. The terms of the reparations, most of which are negotiated by the Conference on Jewish Material Claims Against Germany (which negotiated about $70 billion of the total), are constantly evolving, with some payments made on a one-time basis and others as monthly pensions of varying amounts. The Conference has a good breakdown of the various funds, and how much they've paid out, here.

 

In 2005, an Israeli government report put the economic cost of the Holocaust — in terms of lost income, unpaid wages, and seized property — at somewhere between $240 billion and $320 billion. Even the extensive reparation efforts undertaken to date do not come close to equalling that. Obviously, further compensation for the loss of loved ones and pain and suffering incurred would push that figure much, much higher.

Apartheid

One of the duties of South Africa's post-apartheid Truth and Reconciliation Commission, besides investigating human rights abuses committed by the apartheid government, was recommending reparations and other policies to redress those abuses and aid victims of the former regime.

The commission recommended about $360 million in reparations, to be distributed in six annual payments to victims identified by the Commission, but in 2003 president Thabo Mbeki announced in 2003 that he would authorize only $85 billion, to be given in one-time payments of $3,900 (above the average annual salary in the country at that time). The recipients numbered 16,397 as of 2012, a tiny fraction of the actual number of people victimized by the regime.

Japanese internment

The forced internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans in camps during World War II resulted in about $3.1 billion in property loss and $6.4 billion in income loss, in 2014 dollars. If you account for the possibility that that money might have been invested and gotten above-inflation returns, the economic losses are even larger.

 

Congress made two attempts at reparations, the Japanese-American Claims Act of 1948 and the Civil Liberties Act of 1988. Between 1948 and 1965, the former authorized payments totaling $38 million (which comes to somewhere between $286 to $374 million in 2014 dollars), which didn't come close to matching the economic loss.

 

The latter offered survivors $20,000 each in reparations. By 1998, 80,000 survivors had collected their share, for a total payout of $1.6 billion (between $2.3 billion and $3.2 billion today). There is no accounting by which either measure adequately repaid internees for their economic losses, let alone compensated for pain and suffering.

Forced sterilization

Most Americans states practiced one or another form of eugenics during the 20th century, with forced sterilizations of "unfit" people being a prime instrument. The targets were largely but by no means entirely mentally or developmentally disabled; poor black women on welfare were especially likely to be victimized in this manner.

 

The Supreme Court gave the practice a green light with 1927's Buck v. Bell, and eventually 33 states adopted the practice, forcibly sterilizing about 65,000 people total through the 1970s. Oregon forcibly sterilized people as late as 1981, and its Board of Eugenics (renamed the "Board of Social Protection" in 1967) was only abolished in 1983.

 

Very few states have acknowledged or apologized for these policies, and only one, North Carolina, has set up a reparations program. The state sterilized about 7,600 people, most of whom are no longer living, but last year passed a $10 million reparations program that should give the more than 177 living victims somewhere in the range of $50,000 each.

 

The payments should be made within a few years. Some victims have objected, saying this doesn't come close to remedying the injustice. As one victim, Elaine Riddick Jessie (who was sterilized at age 14 after being raped and giving the resulting son up for adoption), put it, "If I accepted it, what kind of value am I putting on my life?"

California, which sterilized by far the largest number of people of any state, has yet to pay out reparations.

Tuskegee experiment

After the end of the Tuskegee experiment — in which 399 black men with syphilis were left untreated to study the progression of the disease between 1932 and 1972 — the government reached a $10 million out of court settlement with the victims and their families in 1974, which included both monetary reparations (in 2014 dollars, $178,000 for men in the study who had syphilis, $72,000 for heirs, $77,000 for those in the control group and $24,000 for heirs of those in the control group) and a promise of lifelong medical treatment for both participants and their immediate families. According to the CDC, 15 descendants are still receiving treatment through the program today.

Rosewood

In 1923, the primarily black town of Rosewood on the Gulf Coast of Florida was destroyed in a race riot that, by official counts, killed at least six black residents and two whites (though some descendants of the town's residents have claimed many more were killed and dumped in mass graves). In 1994, the state of Florida agreed to a reparations package worth around $3.36 million in 2014 dollars, of which $2.4 million today would be set aside to compensate the 11 or so remaining survivors of the incident, $800,000 to compensate those who were forced to flee the town, and $160,000 would go to college scholarships primarily aimed at descendants.

oh, very fair indeed! however....not one example was of actual reparations and is pure liberal nonsense. by the way, instead of combing the internet looking for support of your racist garbage, why not try brushing up on your grammar? fair enough?  you fucking losers jump on here acting like you know some real shit. damn, this joint is as bad as YAHOO....

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3 hours ago, jacktheripper said:

not one example was of actual reparations 

 

Okay, my silly bol, according to your logic let us then extend negro citizens some of that same, exact compensation you read there which was not one example of actual reparations...fair? lol  ... now go away with your foolishness

 

 

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At first we were told that these were peaceful protests. BLM started out being reasonable, but then Antifa entered the fight, and things became violent. If BLM had stood their ground and not supported Antifa, they would have gained a lot of respect. Instead they joined forces, and attack the cities that would most likely support them. I love protests, but I hate rioters.

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On 8/6/2020 at 4:07 PM, pwkbirdie56 said:

What about the white folks supporting BLM?  Guess you neo cons think they have been brainwashed?

The reason we are upset is because of the rioting. Blacks do get treated unfairly by police and the justice department. Everyone 100% agrees. Trump has been freeing blacks from prison at a rapid rate due to unfair prosecutions. Black support of Trump ranges from 14% to 40%. We can all work together and solve this problem if we stand together. Black and White lives working together instead of fighting and rioting and even recent killings from these riots is not helping anything!

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12 hours ago, Imgreatagain said:

but, they also called me a “nigger” too, 

 

If you are White, then I heard it means that they really like you and feel that they can trust you

 

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On 7/3/2020 at 3:30 AM, pmurT said:

 

Actually I think it is all about, their liberty, which they feel we have refused to them since 1863.  And right now we are failing, miserably, at trying to debunk their racism-theorems which accurately define us White people.

 

Find a black American who was alive before 1863?

 

Now, find a black Democrat National Socialist Plantation Slave who has Sold Themselves into Bondage?

 

Conservativism  V.  Democrat National Socialism

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