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Can someone please explain to me who the delegates are? Weirdly there's no info on this anywhere online that can be easily found. I mean WHO are they? Is it like the guy down the street who works at the bowling alley? Are they people walking around in suits and briefcases hanging out in government buildings? I've never heard of anyone, when asked what they do for a living saying "Oh, I'm a delegate". For that matter, WHO are lobbyists? Bizarre mystery people out there influencing everything and yet phantoms.

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On 3/3/2020 at 5:49 PM, progressivecitizen said:

Can someone please explain to me who the delegates are? Weirdly there's no info on this anywhere online that can be easily found. I mean WHO are they? Is it like the guy down the street who works at the bowling alley? Are they people walking around in suits and briefcases hanging out in government buildings? I've never heard of anyone, when asked what they do for a living saying "Oh, I'm a delegate". For that matter, WHO are lobbyists? Bizarre mystery people out there influencing everything and yet phantoms.

oh sure, wouldn't that be nice if you could just google it during the primary season. who are the delegates and why in the general election. are we to believe they are the same ones in each of the two parties. we know you need 270, wouldn't it be nice in a simplified format upfront for all to see and kind of understand?

yes, it would!!!

Peace!

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, progressivecitizen said:

So who are the delegates???

 

Google is your friend.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/03/politics/democrats-delegate-rules-2020-explained/index.html

Quote

(CNN)The Democratic primary is not a race to win states, but to amass delegates. It's delegates who pick the nominee at the Democratic National Convention, scheduled for July in Milwaukee.

Read below to understand how they're selected and what happens to the delegates won by candidates who drop out of the race.
This will get complicated. You have been warned.
The most important thing to remember is the magic number: 1,991.
That's the number of pledged delegates required to cinch the nomination. It's more than half the total of 3,979 pledged delegates.
Two more key things:
15% threshold -- A candidate can get delegates only if they get to 15% of the vote at EITHER the state level OR in a particular congressional or state legislative district.
Proportionality -- Democrats allocate their delegates proportionally. That means a candidate could not get the most votes in any particular state but still amass a solid base of delegates if he or she is achieving the 15% thresholds.
One good way to look at this is that it is 57 contests in the states, territories and the Democrats Abroad organization, but also hundreds of district-level contests. Candidates can get delegates either way.
The information below is specifically about Democrats. Republicans treat the system somewhat differently, but President Donald Trump has it sewn up this year.

3,979 pledged delegates

What is a pledged delegate? A pledged delegate is a delegate allocated to a candidate based on his or her performance in a caucus or primary. The campaigns have the ability to vet these delegates and can even submit a list of names to represent them.
Simple enough, right? Wrong!
2,591 district-level pledged delegates -- Not all pledged delegates are selected in the same way. There are state-level delegates and district-level delegates. Most district-level delegates are determined at either a congressional district or state legislative district level.
1,388 state-level pledged delegates -- The rest of the pledged delegates, 1,388 of them, are awarded at the state level. And there are two kinds of state-level delegates:
- "Pledged Party Leader and Elected Officials (PLEO)" delegates. These are high-ranking elected officials, like big-city mayors, who get to be delegates at the convention. They're pledged proportionally to the top performers in their states.
- At-large pledged delegates, who are selected by the state party. If a candidate drops out of the race after winning state-wide delegates, their sate-level at-large pledged delegates are redistributed among the remaining viable candidates. All the state-level pledged delegates won by Mike Bloomberg, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar and Elizabeth Warren, for instance, could be doled out to Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden, depending on results in a particular state.
How to get delegates without winning anything -- It is possible for a candidate to get less than 15% in the statewide contest but still obtain delegates by getting better than 15% at the district level. That's how Klobuchar emerged from Iowa with a delegate. She did very well in the 4th Congressional District, but got less than the 15% threshold statewide.
If one candidate is ahead, as Biden was in South Carolina, there's a good chance he or she will get a good portion of the delegates from that state. But Sanders still got 15 delegates there.

771 unpledged delegates

If you're old enough to remember 2008 or 2016, you might remember superdelegates. Also known as unpledged delegates or "automatic" delegates, these are the party bigs -- congresspeople, governors, senators and former presidents -- who aren't tied to any particular candidates regardless of what happens in their state primaries.
To give this process a greater sheen of democracy, the party took some power from superdelegates, in part to mollify Sanders supporters, who were still smarting after superdelegates helped deliver the nomination to Hillary Clinton in 2016.
In 2020, superdelegates/unpledged/automatic delegates won't get a say on the nominee at the convention unless or until a first ballot fails to get a nominee. There is one exception: If a candidate gets enough delegates to make it mathematically impossible for superdelegates to change the outcome, then they can vote. That means they could be decisive if there is no consensus nominee by the convention.
Note: The number of unpledged delegates can change. If a member of Congress dies or resigns, for instance, their delegate spot goes with them until a replacement is put in office. The number of pledged delegates, however, stays the same.

The after-primary: What happens to the delegates of former campaigns?

After the voting, the coming together. The last primary contest will be in June, but about 90% of the country will have had a say by the end of April. Assuming there is no one with a clear majority, that will leave some three months for campaigns to reach out to delegates pledged to former candidates as well as to unpledged delegates who had supported former candidates in order to solicit support on the convention floor.
What happens to delegates pledged to dropouts? District-level delegates pledged to former candidates will become very popular if the fight between Biden and Sanders goes all the way to the convention. There's nothing that legally requires them to vote for anyone in particular, although different state parties have different rules. The national party says they should follow their conscience. Most state-level pledged delegates have not been selected yet, so they will be reallocated among remaining candidates once they are finally selected.
Best case. Most Democrats agree that the best scenario would be for all but the winning candidate to suspend their campaigns before the convention. The system is built assuming the party comes together. This year, however, that seems less likely than in years past.
Worst case. These things usually work out before there is voting on the convention floor. The last time the first round of voting didn't anoint a Democratic nominee was 1952 (that was Adlai Stevenson, and Democrats lost in November of that year, to Dwight Eisenhower).
After really difficult primaries, Democrats usually lose.
Hubert Humphrey lost in November after there was violence outside the controversial 1968 convention, when party elders selected him over the anti-war favorite George McGovern. Four years later, McGovern got the nomination. He lost the election.
In 1980, Sen. Ted Kennedy took his campaign to the convention before conceding. (President Jimmy Carter lost in November.)
In 1988, Jesse Jackson's supporters felt snubbed by the winner, Michael Dukakis. (Dukakis lost in November.)
In 1992, a bruising Democratic primary was offset by a bruising Republican primary for President George H.W. Bush. And Bill Clinton was helped in the general election by Ross Perot's bid as an independent.
Also: It's relatively rare for a Democratic nominee to get a majority just with pledged delegates. The last one to do it was John Kerry in 2004, even after a tough primary. (He lost in November.)
The aforementioned 2008 contest between Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton is the only one of these that ended in a victory in the general election.
This year, Sanders has said his fight is with the Democratic establishment. And the Democratic establishment now seems to be circling the wagons around Biden.
So get ready.

 

 

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That is a description of their political role, not who they are. Is the plumber who lives down the street a delegate? Is a lawyer who works for politicians a delegate? Do you go to delegate college? What's the deal with these phantom people?

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47 minutes ago, progressivecitizen said:

That is a description of their political role, not who they are. Is the plumber who lives down the street a delegate? Is a lawyer who works for politicians a delegate? Do you go to delegate college? What's the deal with these phantom people?

 

The delegates are:---  Current and former office holders, both state and federal ...  people of influence ...  judges ... prominent polsters ...  and other outstanding deputies, commissioners and luminaries within the party.

 

For instance:  Here is a sample of a few delegates.  Some of the names are instantly recognizable.  The entire list is many times longer.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_2020_Democratic_Party_automatic_delegates

Note:  Highlight the list and the names will pop out more clearly

Delegate State Position Endorsement Date Ref.
Andrew Cuomo New York (state) New York governor Biden January 2, 2019 [7]
Dianne Feinstein California California senator Biden January 3, 2019 [8]
Tom Carper Delaware Delaware senator Biden January 8, 2019 [9]
Tulsi Gabbard Hawaii Hawaii representative Gabbard January 11, 2019 [10]
Laphonza Butler California California DNC member Harris January 21, 2019 [11]
James Zogby Washington, D.C. District of Columbia DNC member Sanders January 25, 2019 [12]
Ted Lieu California California representative Harris January 28, 2019 [13]
Nanette Barragán California California representative Harris January 29, 2019 [14]
Bob Menendez New Jersey New Jersey senator Booker February 1, 2019 [15]
Phil Murphy New Jersey New Jersey governor Booker February 1, 2019 [16]
Clay N. Middleton South Carolina South Carolina DNC member Booker February 4, 2019 [17]
Walter Mondale Minnesota Minnesota distinguished party leader (former Vice President) Klobuchar February 6, 2019 [18]
Jim McGovern Massachusetts Massachusetts representative Warren February 8, 2019 [19]
Ed Markey Massachusetts Massachusetts senator Warren February 9, 2019 [20]
Joseph P. Kennedy III Massachusetts Massachusetts representative Warren February 9, 2019 [20]
Lori Trahan Massachusetts Massachusetts representative Warren February 9, 2019 [20]
Elizabeth Warren Massachusetts Massachusetts senator Warren February 9, 2019  

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Ahhhhh. Now THAT'S an answer- thank you! This is info probably 98% of the country doesn't even think about. How fascinating these "delegates" they keep referring to in primaries, like they are points on a leaderboard, are actually our national politicians!

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8 hours ago, progressivecitizen said:

Ahhhhh. Now THAT'S an answer- thank you! This is info probably 98% of the country doesn't even think about. How fascinating these "delegates" they keep referring to in primaries, like they are points on a leaderboard, are actually our national politicians!

 

The list Bludog provided is for the 771 Super-delegates, (also known as the DNC establishment).

In 2016, they were allowed to vote on the 1st ballot.

Not this year.

 

They will not 'officially' cast their vote until the 2nd ballot, (also known as  a 'brokered' convention)

The chances for a brokered convention, are decreasing, IMHO.

 

1st ballot

There will be 3,799 'normal', or pledged delegates on the 1st ballot. Pledged delegates are proportionally assigned according to the results of primary elections.

 

In order to win the 1st ballot, a candidate must win a majority, (or 1,991 votes), not a plurality.

As of this writing, 1,651, (or 41.5%) have already been 'pledged' to various candidates from states that have voted.

 

Biden has earned 823 pledged delegates

This represents 49.8% of the votes cast thus far, which,  is not quite the enough for majority<50%, but very close.

Biden needs 1,168 more delegates to achieved majority on the 1st ballot.

 

Sanders has earned 663 pledged delegates

This represents 40.2% of the votes cast thus far, or 16.7% of the 3,799 pledged delegates

Sanders needs 1,328 more delegates to achieved majority on the 1st ballot.

 

Here's the kicker..

Pledged delegates can vote for a different candidate on the first ballot if they are "released" by the candidate they are pledged to.

 

Bloomberg, Buttigieg, Klobuchar, (and possibly Warren) will  release their pledged delegates, and encourage them to vote for Biden, which could put him over the top on the 1st ballot.

 

 

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