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You idiots can't even get medicaid right and you want to hand everyone Medicare for All????😂

 

Oh and notice ACA costs 50% higher than projected because we told you MORONS you NEVER decrease the cost of a good/service by INCREASING DEMAND and DECREASING SUPPLY YOU ECONOMIC FOOLS.................

 

This is why the left should be removed from ANY economic legislation or debates. 

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/sallypipes/2017/08/21/the-false-promise-of-medicaid-for-all/#7452dd615179

 

5,385 viewsAug 21, 2017, 08:00am

The False Promise Of 'Medicaid For All' 

 
Sally Pipes
Sally PipesContributor 
Policy
I cover health policy as President of the Pacific Research Institute
This article is more than 2 years old.
A small group of activists rally against the GOP health care plan outside of the Metropolitan... [+] Republican Club, July 5, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

A small group of activists rally against the GOP health care plan outside of the Metropolitan... [+]

"Medicaid for All" has suddenly become the darling of the health reform crowd. Nevada almost became the first state in the nation to adopt Medicaid for All this year -- until Gov. Brian Sandoval vetoedthe plan in June. Other states, including Massachusetts and Minnesota, are looking into it.

These Medicaid-for-All plans would let anyone "buy into" the program. Middle-class families could pay government-set premiums for Medicaid coverage. They would get guaranteed health benefits at government-subsidized prices. And given that the program pays healthcare providers less than private insurance, Medicaid for All might even rein in health spending -- or so the thinking goes.

This argument for "Medicaid for All" might sound compelling. But Medicaid provides low-quality care to its current beneficiaries, who are generally poor and among the most vulnerable in society, at extremely high cost to taxpayers. Expanding it would only exacerbate its problems.

 

Today In: Opinion

Medicaid started out as an anti-poverty program. But it has steadily expanded since 1966, from 4 million enrollees in 1966 to 20.7 million a decade later. Today, 68 million are on the program. Since 2000, the share of the U.S. population on Medicaid has jumped from 12.6 percent to 23 percent. In California, 31 percent of the population is on Medi-Cal, the state's version of the program.

Thanks to Obamacare, some 14 million additional people have enrolled in Medicaid. It's now the largest single insurance program in the country. Thirty-one states -- including 17 with Republican governors -- opted for the extra federal money that Obamacare gave them to expand Medicaid eligibility to all adults making less than 138 percent of poverty.

PROMOTED

 
 
 

Medicaid is also supposedly very popular. Seventy-four percent of the public says that they have a favorable view of the program.

Why not expand it further? Michael Sparer, head of Columbia University's school of public health, argued in a lengthy article for Vox.com earlier this month that a Medicaid-for-all type plan "offers the most plausible path to an American version of affordable universal coverage."

What could go wrong?

Let's begin with the idea that Medicaid is cost-effective. Sparer says, for example, that Medicaid's costs are 25 percent lower than private insurance because Medicaid pays providers "far less than private insurers."

But private insurance costs are higher in part because Medicaid underpays doctors and hospitals. If Medicaid is paying doctors and hospitals less than they need to cover their costs, then someone else has to pay more for those providers to stay in business. That someone is the typical private insurer.

Many providers avoid Medicaid altogether. A Kaiser Family Foundation report found that only 45 percent of primary care doctors are willing to take on new Medicaid patients, thanks to its low reimbursement rates and heavy administrative burdens. Nearly one-third won't see anyone on Medicaid.

By comparison, 80 percent of doctors are taking new privately insured patients.

In California, the access crisis for Medi-Cal patients is so acute that two civil rights groups are suing the state, claiming that the program's 13.5 million beneficiaries confined in "a separate and unequal system of health care." They are arguing for higher reimbursements, in hopes that more money will entice doctors to see them.

Medicaid patients who are unable to find a doctor end up in the emergency room. After California expanded its Medi-Cal program, for example, enrollment surged. The number of doctors in the state actually went down. Consequently, ER visits in the state exploded.

The same phenomenon has appeared in states across the country. And it's one reason why the costs of Obamacare's Medicaid expansion are running about 50 percent higher than expected.

Never mind that President Obama sold the expansion as a means of keeping people out of the ER.

Medicaid for All also wouldn't necessarily improve people's health. A comprehensive study of Oregon's Medicaid program found that its enrollees weren't better off in terms of their health than those who were uninsured.

Expanding Medicaid could also encourage employers to quit offering their own health benefits, which are generally of much higher quality. The Congressional Budget Office figures that Obamacare's exchange subsidies led to 4 million people being kicked off their employer plans this year. By 2020, if Obamacare is not repealed and replaced, that number could rise to 9 million.

That's despite Obamacare's mandate that employers with more than 50 workers provide coverage; they would apparently rather pay the fine.

Adding millions of people to Medicaid would stretch the program's already tight finances to the breaking point. In 2015, total spending exceeded $550 billion. Spending is projected to increase at a 5.7 percent annual clip through 2025, when it will shoot past $950 billion. And that's just on its current trajectory.

The federal government may be able to go into debt semi-permanently to finance Medicaid. But states cannot. They currently cover a little more than one-third of the program's costs. There's no way they'll be able to shake loose ever-increasing amounts of tax revenue to pay for an expanded share of the program.

Medicaid can't adequately meet the needs of the 68 million people currently enrolled in the program. Expanding it further would just force millions more to share their fate.

Sally C. Pipes is President, CEO, and Thomas W. Smith Fellow in Health Care Policy at the Pacific Research Institute. Her latest book is The Way Out of Obamacare (Encounter 2016).

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17 minutes ago, DeepBreath said:

You idiots can't even get medicaid right and you want to hand everyone Medicare for All????😂

 

Oh and notice ACA costs 50% higher than projected because we told you MORONS you NEVER decrease the cost of a good/service by INCREASING DEMAND and DECREASING SUPPLY YOU ECONOMIC FOOLS.................

 

This is why the left should be removed from ANY economic legislation or debates. 

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/sallypipes/2017/08/21/the-false-promise-of-medicaid-for-all/#7452dd615179

 

5,385 viewsAug 21, 2017, 08:00am

The False Promise Of 'Medicaid For All' 

 
Sally Pipes
Sally PipesContributor 
Policy
I cover health policy as President of the Pacific Research Institute
This article is more than 2 years old.
  •  
  •  
  •  
A small group of activists rally against the GOP health care plan outside of the Metropolitan... [+] Republican Club, July 5, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

A small group of activists rally against the GOP health care plan outside of the Metropolitan... [+]

"Medicaid for All" has suddenly become the darling of the health reform crowd. Nevada almost became the first state in the nation to adopt Medicaid for All this year -- until Gov. Brian Sandoval vetoedthe plan in June. Other states, including Massachusetts and Minnesota, are looking into it.

These Medicaid-for-All plans would let anyone "buy into" the program. Middle-class families could pay government-set premiums for Medicaid coverage. They would get guaranteed health benefits at government-subsidized prices. And given that the program pays healthcare providers less than private insurance, Medicaid for All might even rein in health spending -- or so the thinking goes.

This argument for "Medicaid for All" might sound compelling. But Medicaid provides low-quality care to its current beneficiaries, who are generally poor and among the most vulnerable in society, at extremely high cost to taxpayers. Expanding it would only exacerbate its problems.

 

Today In: Opinion

Medicaid started out as an anti-poverty program. But it has steadily expanded since 1966, from 4 million enrollees in 1966 to 20.7 million a decade later. Today, 68 million are on the program. Since 2000, the share of the U.S. population on Medicaid has jumped from 12.6 percent to 23 percent. In California, 31 percent of the population is on Medi-Cal, the state's version of the program.

Thanks to Obamacare, some 14 million additional people have enrolled in Medicaid. It's now the largest single insurance program in the country. Thirty-one states -- including 17 with Republican governors -- opted for the extra federal money that Obamacare gave them to expand Medicaid eligibility to all adults making less than 138 percent of poverty.

PROMOTED

 
 
 

Medicaid is also supposedly very popular. Seventy-four percent of the public says that they have a favorable view of the program.

Why not expand it further? Michael Sparer, head of Columbia University's school of public health, argued in a lengthy article for Vox.com earlier this month that a Medicaid-for-all type plan "offers the most plausible path to an American version of affordable universal coverage."

What could go wrong?

Let's begin with the idea that Medicaid is cost-effective. Sparer says, for example, that Medicaid's costs are 25 percent lower than private insurance because Medicaid pays providers "far less than private insurers."

But private insurance costs are higher in part because Medicaid underpays doctors and hospitals. If Medicaid is paying doctors and hospitals less than they need to cover their costs, then someone else has to pay more for those providers to stay in business. That someone is the typical private insurer.

Many providers avoid Medicaid altogether. A Kaiser Family Foundation report found that only 45 percent of primary care doctors are willing to take on new Medicaid patients, thanks to its low reimbursement rates and heavy administrative burdens. Nearly one-third won't see anyone on Medicaid.

By comparison, 80 percent of doctors are taking new privately insured patients.

In California, the access crisis for Medi-Cal patients is so acute that two civil rights groups are suing the state, claiming that the program's 13.5 million beneficiaries confined in "a separate and unequal system of health care." They are arguing for higher reimbursements, in hopes that more money will entice doctors to see them.

Medicaid patients who are unable to find a doctor end up in the emergency room. After California expanded its Medi-Cal program, for example, enrollment surged. The number of doctors in the state actually went down. Consequently, ER visits in the state exploded.

The same phenomenon has appeared in states across the country. And it's one reason why the costs of Obamacare's Medicaid expansion are running about 50 percent higher than expected.

Never mind that President Obama sold the expansion as a means of keeping people out of the ER.

Medicaid for All also wouldn't necessarily improve people's health. A comprehensive study of Oregon's Medicaid program found that its enrollees weren't better off in terms of their health than those who were uninsured.

Expanding Medicaid could also encourage employers to quit offering their own health benefits, which are generally of much higher quality. The Congressional Budget Office figures that Obamacare's exchange subsidies led to 4 million people being kicked off their employer plans this year. By 2020, if Obamacare is not repealed and replaced, that number could rise to 9 million.

That's despite Obamacare's mandate that employers with more than 50 workers provide coverage; they would apparently rather pay the fine.

Adding millions of people to Medicaid would stretch the program's already tight finances to the breaking point. In 2015, total spending exceeded $550 billion. Spending is projected to increase at a 5.7 percent annual clip through 2025, when it will shoot past $950 billion. And that's just on its current trajectory.

The federal government may be able to go into debt semi-permanently to finance Medicaid. But states cannot. They currently cover a little more than one-third of the program's costs. There's no way they'll be able to shake loose ever-increasing amounts of tax revenue to pay for an expanded share of the program.

Medicaid can't adequately meet the needs of the 68 million people currently enrolled in the program. Expanding it further would just force millions more to share their fate.

Sally C. Pipes is President, CEO, and Thomas W. Smith Fellow in Health Care Policy at the Pacific Research Institute. Her latest book is The Way Out of Obamacare (Encounter 2016).

Obamacare is really ObamaFacePlant.

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6 minutes ago, personreal said:

Obamacare is really ObamaFacePlant.

Yep and when they project Medicare for All to cost 50+ trillion? We're looking at easily 75-100 trillion over 10 years...

 

These IDIOTIC, RETARDED, INBRED LEFTIES are complaining about 1.4 trillion dollar deficits and want to add 7.5 to 10 trillion MORE???????😂

 

The left is literally RETARDED when it comes to simple economics. 

 

NEVER in the history of mankind has the price of a product or service gone down by INCREASING DEMAND and DISCOURAGING supply. 

 

We KNEW this wasn't going to happen with ACA. We TOLD THEM this wasn't going to happen with ACA. Now we're paying 50% more than projected for ACA because lefties are economic RETARDS. 

 

 

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1 minute ago, DeepBreath said:

Yep and when they project Medicare for All to cost 50+ trillion? We're looking at easily 75-100 trillion over 10 years...

 

These IDIOTIC, RETARDED, INBRED LEFTIES are complaining about 1.4 trillion dollar deficits and want to add 7.5 to 10 trillion MORE???????😂

 

The left is literally RETARDED when it comes to simple economics. 

 

NEVER in the history of mankind has the price of a product or service gone down by INCREASING DEMAND and DISCOURAGING supply. 

 

We KNEW this wasn't going to happen with ACA. We TOLD THEM this wasn't going to happen with ACA. Now we're paying 50% more than projected for ACA because lefties are economic RETARDS. 

 

 

They're Twinkie Butts too.  :)

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33 minutes ago, DeepBreath said:

You idiots can't even get medicaid right and you want to hand everyone Medicare for All????😂

 

Oh and notice ACA costs 50% higher than projected because we told you MORONS you NEVER decrease the cost of a good/service by INCREASING DEMAND and DECREASING SUPPLY YOU ECONOMIC FOOLS.................

 

This is why the left should be removed from ANY economic legislation or debates. 

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/sallypipes/2017/08/21/the-false-promise-of-medicaid-for-all/#7452dd615179

 

5,385 viewsAug 21, 2017, 08:00am

The False Promise Of 'Medicaid For All' 

 
Sally Pipes
Sally PipesContributor 
Policy
I cover health policy as President of the Pacific Research Institute
This article is more than 2 years old.
  •  
  •  
  •  
A small group of activists rally against the GOP health care plan outside of the Metropolitan... [+] Republican Club, July 5, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

A small group of activists rally against the GOP health care plan outside of the Metropolitan... [+]

"Medicaid for All" has suddenly become the darling of the health reform crowd. Nevada almost became the first state in the nation to adopt Medicaid for All this year -- until Gov. Brian Sandoval vetoedthe plan in June. Other states, including Massachusetts and Minnesota, are looking into it.

These Medicaid-for-All plans would let anyone "buy into" the program. Middle-class families could pay government-set premiums for Medicaid coverage. They would get guaranteed health benefits at government-subsidized prices. And given that the program pays healthcare providers less than private insurance, Medicaid for All might even rein in health spending -- or so the thinking goes.

This argument for "Medicaid for All" might sound compelling. But Medicaid provides low-quality care to its current beneficiaries, who are generally poor and among the most vulnerable in society, at extremely high cost to taxpayers. Expanding it would only exacerbate its problems.

 

Today In: Opinion

Medicaid started out as an anti-poverty program. But it has steadily expanded since 1966, from 4 million enrollees in 1966 to 20.7 million a decade later. Today, 68 million are on the program. Since 2000, the share of the U.S. population on Medicaid has jumped from 12.6 percent to 23 percent. In California, 31 percent of the population is on Medi-Cal, the state's version of the program.

Thanks to Obamacare, some 14 million additional people have enrolled in Medicaid. It's now the largest single insurance program in the country. Thirty-one states -- including 17 with Republican governors -- opted for the extra federal money that Obamacare gave them to expand Medicaid eligibility to all adults making less than 138 percent of poverty.

PROMOTED

 
 
 

Medicaid is also supposedly very popular. Seventy-four percent of the public says that they have a favorable view of the program.

Why not expand it further? Michael Sparer, head of Columbia University's school of public health, argued in a lengthy article for Vox.com earlier this month that a Medicaid-for-all type plan "offers the most plausible path to an American version of affordable universal coverage."

What could go wrong?

Let's begin with the idea that Medicaid is cost-effective. Sparer says, for example, that Medicaid's costs are 25 percent lower than private insurance because Medicaid pays providers "far less than private insurers."

But private insurance costs are higher in part because Medicaid underpays doctors and hospitals. If Medicaid is paying doctors and hospitals less than they need to cover their costs, then someone else has to pay more for those providers to stay in business. That someone is the typical private insurer.

Many providers avoid Medicaid altogether. A Kaiser Family Foundation report found that only 45 percent of primary care doctors are willing to take on new Medicaid patients, thanks to its low reimbursement rates and heavy administrative burdens. Nearly one-third won't see anyone on Medicaid.

By comparison, 80 percent of doctors are taking new privately insured patients.

In California, the access crisis for Medi-Cal patients is so acute that two civil rights groups are suing the state, claiming that the program's 13.5 million beneficiaries confined in "a separate and unequal system of health care." They are arguing for higher reimbursements, in hopes that more money will entice doctors to see them.

Medicaid patients who are unable to find a doctor end up in the emergency room. After California expanded its Medi-Cal program, for example, enrollment surged. The number of doctors in the state actually went down. Consequently, ER visits in the state exploded.

The same phenomenon has appeared in states across the country. And it's one reason why the costs of Obamacare's Medicaid expansion are running about 50 percent higher than expected.

Never mind that President Obama sold the expansion as a means of keeping people out of the ER.

Medicaid for All also wouldn't necessarily improve people's health. A comprehensive study of Oregon's Medicaid program found that its enrollees weren't better off in terms of their health than those who were uninsured.

Expanding Medicaid could also encourage employers to quit offering their own health benefits, which are generally of much higher quality. The Congressional Budget Office figures that Obamacare's exchange subsidies led to 4 million people being kicked off their employer plans this year. By 2020, if Obamacare is not repealed and replaced, that number could rise to 9 million.

That's despite Obamacare's mandate that employers with more than 50 workers provide coverage; they would apparently rather pay the fine.

Adding millions of people to Medicaid would stretch the program's already tight finances to the breaking point. In 2015, total spending exceeded $550 billion. Spending is projected to increase at a 5.7 percent annual clip through 2025, when it will shoot past $950 billion. And that's just on its current trajectory.

The federal government may be able to go into debt semi-permanently to finance Medicaid. But states cannot. They currently cover a little more than one-third of the program's costs. There's no way they'll be able to shake loose ever-increasing amounts of tax revenue to pay for an expanded share of the program.

Medicaid can't adequately meet the needs of the 68 million people currently enrolled in the program. Expanding it further would just force millions more to share their fate.

Sally C. Pipes is President, CEO, and Thomas W. Smith Fellow in Health Care Policy at the Pacific Research Institute. Her latest book is The Way Out of Obamacare (Encounter 2016).

 

 Its real simple, the health care system is making sickness and death mandatory. Mandatory health treatment from eugenics brain damaged people who can not even identify human gender, with traditional herbal treatments or just saying no thanks outlawed.  Just give us all your money and then borrow some money from future generations when you run out of money, don't try to go back to the old system, you need us and the old ways are against the new laws.

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1 hour ago, Chongo said:

 

 Its real simple, the health care system is making sickness and death mandatory. Mandatory health treatment from eugenics brain damaged people who can not even identify human gender, with traditional herbal treatments or just saying no thanks outlawed.  Just give us all your money and then borrow some money from future generations when you run out of money, don't try to go back to the old system, you need us and the old ways are against the new laws.

I’ll refrain from commenting other than the easiest and cheapest way to avoid the entire healthcare system is to:

 

Eat healthy

Exercise

No illicit drugs or excessive alcohol

Don’t smoke or vape

 

 

Living healthy lifestyles is the #1 factor in being healthy. 

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9 minutes ago, DeepBreath said:

I’ll refrain from commenting other than the easiest and cheapest way to avoid the entire healthcare system is to:

 

Eat healthy

Exercise

No illicit drugs or excessive alcohol

Don’t smoke or vape

 

 

Living healthy lifestyles is the #1 factor in being healthy. 

Vaping is relatively harmless. 

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3 minutes ago, DeepBreath said:

Jury is still out on that one. 

Only because big pharmaceutical and big tobacco are fighting it in a truly unholy union. It's been studied for years in Europe and Asia. People have been inhaling pg and vg fog in theaters for 100 years. Vaporized Propylene Glycol has been used in breathing treatments for decades. Commercial flavorings have been inhaled for centuries. There are no creepy unknowns. 

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48 minutes ago, NeoConvict said:

Only because big pharmaceutical and big tobacco are fighting it in a truly unholy union. It's been studied for years in Europe and Asia. People have been inhaling pg and vg fog in theaters for 100 years. Vaporized Propylene Glycol has been used in breathing treatments for decades. Commercial flavorings have been inhaled for centuries. There are no creepy unknowns. 

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/5-truths-you-need-to-know-about-vaping

 

5 Vaping Facts You Need to Know

Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Print Mens Health Heart Health Know Your Heart Risks

Reviewed By:

If you have thought about trying to kick a smoking habit, you’re not alone. Nearly 7 of 10 smokers say they want to stop. Quitting smoking is one of the best things you can do for your health — smoking harms nearly every organ in your body, including your heart. Nearly one-third of deaths from heart disease are the result of smoking and secondhand smoke.

A person exhaling vapor

You might be tempted to turn to electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes, vape pens, and other vaping devices) as a way to ease the transition from traditional cigarettes to not smoking at all. But is smoking e-cigarettes (also called vaping) better for you than using tobacco products? Can e-cigarettes help you to stop smoking once and for all? Michael Blaha, M.D., M.P.H., director of clinical research at the Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, shares health information about vaping.

1: Vaping Is Less Harmful Than Smoking, but It’s Still Not Safe

E-cigarettes heat nicotine (extracted from tobacco), flavorings and other chemicals to create a water vapor that you inhale. Regular tobacco cigarettes contain 7,000 chemicals, many of which are toxic. While we don’t know exactly what chemicals are in e-cigarettes, Blaha says “there’s almost no doubt that they expose you to fewer toxic chemicals than traditional cigarettes.”

However, there has also been an outbreak of lung injuries and deaths associated with vaping. As of December 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed 54 deaths in patients with e-cigarette, or vaping, product use associated lung injury (EVALI).

“These cases appear to predominantly affect people who modify their vaping devices or use black market modified e-liquids. This is especially true for vaping products containing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC),” explains Blaha.

The CDC has identified vitamin E acetate as a chemical of concern among people with EVALI. Vitamin E acetate is a thickening agent often used in THC vaping products, and it was found in all lung fluid samples of EVALI patients examined by the CDC.

The CDC recommends that people:

  • Do not use THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products
  • Avoid using informal sources, such as friends, family or online dealers to obtain a vaping device.
  • Do not modify or add any substances to a vaping device that are not intended by the manufacturer.

2: Research Suggests Vaping Is Bad for Your Heart and Lungs

Nicotine is the primary agent in both regular cigarettes and e-cigarettes, and it is highly addictive. It causes you to crave a smoke and suffer withdrawal symptoms if you ignore the craving. Nicotine is also a toxic substance. It raises your blood pressure and spikes your adrenaline, which increases your heart rate and the likelihood of having a heart attack.

Is vaping bad for you? There are many unknowns about vaping, including what chemicals make up the vapor and how they affect physical health over the long term. “People need to understand that e-cigarettes are potentially dangerous to your health,” says Blaha. “Emerging data suggests links to chronic lung disease and asthma, and associations between dual use of e-cigarettes and smoking with cardiovascular disease. You’re exposing yourself to all kinds of chemicals that we don’t yet understand and that are probably not safe.”

3: Electronic Cigarettes Are Just As Addictive As Traditional Ones

Both e-cigarettes and regular cigarettes contain nicotine, which research suggests may be as addictive as heroin and cocaine. What’s worse, says Blaha, many e-cigarette users get even more nicotine than they would from a tobacco product — you can buy extra-strength cartridges, which have a higher concentration of nicotine, or you can increase the e-cigarette’s voltage to get a greater hit of the substance.

A businessman vapes outdoors.

How to Treat a Burn from a Vape Pen

Vaping burns are rare, but they can be serious, according to the FDA, especially if the device catches on fire while in the owner’s pocket. Here’s what you should know if you get burned by a vape pen or e-cigarette.

4: Electronic Cigarettes Aren’t the Best Smoking Cessation Tool

Although they’ve been marketed as an aid to help you quit smoking, e-cigarettes have not received Food and Drug Administration approval as smoking cessation devices. A recent study found that most people who intended to use e-cigarettes to kick the nicotine habit ended up continuing to smoke both traditional and e-cigarettes.

In the light of the EVALI outbreak, the CDC advises adults who use e-cigarettes for smoking cessation to weigh the risks and benefits and consider use of other FDA-approved smoking cessation options.

5: A New Generation Is Getting Hooked on Nicotine

Among youth, e-cigarettes are more popular than any traditional tobacco product. In 2015, the U.S. surgeon general reported that e-cigarette use among high school students had increased by 900%, and 40% of young e-cigarette users had never smoked regular tobacco.

According to Blaha, there are three reasons e-cigarettes may be particularly enticing to young people. First, many teens believe that vaping is less harmful than smoking. Second, e-cigarettes have a lower per-use cost than traditional cigarettes. Finally, vape cartridges are often formulated with flavorings such as apple pie and watermelon that appeal to younger users.

Both youths and adults find the lack of smoke appealing. With no smell, e-cigarettes reduce the stigma of smoking.

“What I find most concerning about the rise of vaping is that people who would’ve never smoked otherwise, especially youth, are taking up the habit,” says Blaha. “It’s one thing if you convert from cigarette smoking to vaping. It’s quite another thing to start up nicotine use with vaping. And, it often leads to using traditional tobacco products down the road.”

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25 minutes ago, DeepBreath said:

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/5-truths-you-need-to-know-about-vaping

 

5 Vaping Facts You Need to Know

Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Print Mens Health Heart Health Know Your Heart Risks

Reviewed By:

If you have thought about trying to kick a smoking habit, you’re not alone. Nearly 7 of 10 smokers say they want to stop. Quitting smoking is one of the best things you can do for your health — smoking harms nearly every organ in your body, including your heart. Nearly one-third of deaths from heart disease are the result of smoking and secondhand smoke.

A person exhaling vapor

You might be tempted to turn to electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes, vape pens, and other vaping devices) as a way to ease the transition from traditional cigarettes to not smoking at all. But is smoking e-cigarettes (also called vaping) better for you than using tobacco products? Can e-cigarettes help you to stop smoking once and for all? Michael Blaha, M.D., M.P.H., director of clinical research at the Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Center for the Prevention of Heart Disease, shares health information about vaping.

1: Vaping Is Less Harmful Than Smoking, but It’s Still Not Safe

E-cigarettes heat nicotine (extracted from tobacco), flavorings and other chemicals to create a water vapor that you inhale. Regular tobacco cigarettes contain 7,000 chemicals, many of which are toxic. While we don’t know exactly what chemicals are in e-cigarettes, Blaha says “there’s almost no doubt that they expose you to fewer toxic chemicals than traditional cigarettes.”

However, there has also been an outbreak of lung injuries and deaths associated with vaping. As of December 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed 54 deaths in patients with e-cigarette, or vaping, product use associated lung injury (EVALI).

“These cases appear to predominantly affect people who modify their vaping devices or use black market modified e-liquids. This is especially true for vaping products containing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC),” explains Blaha.

The CDC has identified vitamin E acetate as a chemical of concern among people with EVALI. Vitamin E acetate is a thickening agent often used in THC vaping products, and it was found in all lung fluid samples of EVALI patients examined by the CDC.

The CDC recommends that people:

  • Do not use THC-containing e-cigarette, or vaping, products
  • Avoid using informal sources, such as friends, family or online dealers to obtain a vaping device.
  • Do not modify or add any substances to a vaping device that are not intended by the manufacturer.

2: Research Suggests Vaping Is Bad for Your Heart and Lungs

Nicotine is the primary agent in both regular cigarettes and e-cigarettes, and it is highly addictive. It causes you to crave a smoke and suffer withdrawal symptoms if you ignore the craving. Nicotine is also a toxic substance. It raises your blood pressure and spikes your adrenaline, which increases your heart rate and the likelihood of having a heart attack.

Is vaping bad for you? There are many unknowns about vaping, including what chemicals make up the vapor and how they affect physical health over the long term. “People need to understand that e-cigarettes are potentially dangerous to your health,” says Blaha. “Emerging data suggests links to chronic lung disease and asthma, and associations between dual use of e-cigarettes and smoking with cardiovascular disease. You’re exposing yourself to all kinds of chemicals that we don’t yet understand and that are probably not safe.”

3: Electronic Cigarettes Are Just As Addictive As Traditional Ones

Both e-cigarettes and regular cigarettes contain nicotine, which research suggests may be as addictive as heroin and cocaine. What’s worse, says Blaha, many e-cigarette users get even more nicotine than they would from a tobacco product — you can buy extra-strength cartridges, which have a higher concentration of nicotine, or you can increase the e-cigarette’s voltage to get a greater hit of the substance.

A businessman vapes outdoors.

How to Treat a Burn from a Vape Pen

Vaping burns are rare, but they can be serious, according to the FDA, especially if the device catches on fire while in the owner’s pocket. Here’s what you should know if you get burned by a vape pen or e-cigarette.

4: Electronic Cigarettes Aren’t the Best Smoking Cessation Tool

Although they’ve been marketed as an aid to help you quit smoking, e-cigarettes have not received Food and Drug Administration approval as smoking cessation devices. A recent study found that most people who intended to use e-cigarettes to kick the nicotine habit ended up continuing to smoke both traditional and e-cigarettes.

In the light of the EVALI outbreak, the CDC advises adults who use e-cigarettes for smoking cessation to weigh the risks and benefits and consider use of other FDA-approved smoking cessation options.

5: A New Generation Is Getting Hooked on Nicotine

Among youth, e-cigarettes are more popular than any traditional tobacco product. In 2015, the U.S. surgeon general reported that e-cigarette use among high school students had increased by 900%, and 40% of young e-cigarette users had never smoked regular tobacco.

According to Blaha, there are three reasons e-cigarettes may be particularly enticing to young people. First, many teens believe that vaping is less harmful than smoking. Second, e-cigarettes have a lower per-use cost than traditional cigarettes. Finally, vape cartridges are often formulated with flavorings such as apple pie and watermelon that appeal to younger users.

Both youths and adults find the lack of smoke appealing. With no smell, e-cigarettes reduce the stigma of smoking.

“What I find most concerning about the rise of vaping is that people who would’ve never smoked otherwise, especially youth, are taking up the habit,” says Blaha. “It’s one thing if you convert from cigarette smoking to vaping. It’s quite another thing to start up nicotine use with vaping. And, it often leads to using traditional tobacco products down the road.”

The lung damage has been isolated to THC vaping using black market marijuana pens. Vitamin E is a fatty acid which is used in the extraction of THC from pot. Inhaling fats into your lungs is begging for bacterial infections, which is exactly what has happened. Not a single case of these injuries had been linked to nicotine vaping. Its all been black market pot use.

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2 hours ago, DeepBreath said:

I’ll refrain from commenting other than the easiest and cheapest way to avoid the entire healthcare system is to:

 

Eat healthy

Exercise

No illicit drugs or excessive alcohol

Don’t smoke or vape

 

 

Living healthy lifestyles is the #1 factor in being healthy. 

 

Mandatory German death camp health care was not healthy (at least it was free) and mandatory USA medical is already worse. Millions of new autistic people since the new vaccine court was put into place and drug manufacturers can not be libel due to new rules. The democrats are working on legislation that will allow a social worker to sign a death warrant for the disabled that they helped to create (how dare they?)

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10 hours ago, NeoConvict said:

The lung damage has been isolated to THC vaping using black market marijuana pens. Vitamin E is a fatty acid which is used in the extraction of THC from pot. Inhaling fats into your lungs is begging for bacterial infections, which is exactly what has happened. Not a single case of these injuries had been linked to nicotine vaping. Its all been black market pot use.

I don't think that's true at all. 

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9 hours ago, Chongo said:

 

Mandatory German death camp health care was not healthy (at least it was free) and mandatory USA medical is already worse. Millions of new autistic people since the new vaccine court was put into place and drug manufacturers can not be libel due to new rules. The democrats are working on legislation that will allow a social worker to sign a death warrant for the disabled that they helped to create (how dare they?)

Vaccines causing autism has been thoroughly debunked. It was created by a man getting paid by trial lawyers and the "study" involved something like 10 children. 😂

 

It was a scam for trial lawyers to get rich off of at the detriment to society. 

 

As soon as I hear anything about anti-vaxxer, I know I'm dealing with a mentally unstable wacko I should probably be getting admitted to my psych facility.  

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13 hours ago, DeepBreath said:

Vaccines causing autism has been thoroughly debunked. It was created by a man getting paid by trial lawyers and the "study" involved something like 10 children. 😂

 

It was a scam for trial lawyers to get rich off of at the detriment to society. 

 

As soon as I hear anything about anti-vaxxer, I know I'm dealing with a mentally unstable wacko I should probably be getting admitted to my psych facility.  

 

Or you will be having less work at the psych facility and admitting less people with actual neurological damage etc.

 

.Autism rates began exploding right after vaccine drug manufactures could no longer be held libel in a USA court  for vaccine damage due to rule changes so that the government pays for all vaccine damages instead of the vaccine manufacturing company (socialistic law).  The vaccinated can no longer be compared to a non vaccinated person in a USA court .

 

The non vaccinated

 

 

The vaccinated safe people, join the commune, be safe and secure.

 

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13 hours ago, DeepBreath said:

I don't think that's true at all. 

Read the autopsy reports. All 50 dead were found to have thc in their systems and vitamin E distillates in their lungs. All died from using black market thc vaporizers. 80% of the thousand sickened admitted to using black market thc vaporizers, the other 20% are likely lying. 

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11 minutes ago, Chongo said:

 

.Autism rates began exploding right after vaccine drug manufactures could no longer be held libel in a USA court  for vaccine damage due to rule changes so that the government pays for all vaccine damages instead of the vaccine manufacturing company (socialistic law).  The vaccinated can no longer be compared to a non vaccinated person in a USA court .

Autism rates exploded when they expanded the spectrum to include more presentations. We have always had introverted paint lickers and those prone to violent outbursts, we just didn't label them autistic. 

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12 minutes ago, NeoConvict said:

Autism rates exploded when they expanded the spectrum to include more presentations. We have always had introverted paint lickers and those prone to violent outbursts, we just didn't label them autistic. 

 

And so now 100 percent of you need vaccines and psych drugs in order to survive even though you are supposed to have somehow had the ability to random generate from a rock soup then becoming male and female all on your own.

 

 

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28 minutes ago, Chongo said:

 

And so now 100 percent of you need vaccines and psych drugs in order to survive even though you are supposed to have somehow had the ability to random generate from a rock soup then becoming male and female all on your own.

 

 

Abiogenesis is a laughable theory. Third world people cope just fine without psych drugs or vaccines. We are weakened by our sedentary lifestyle and extremely poor diets. Over use of antibiotics has led to killer infections and bacterial mutations. Helicopter parenting has led to peanut adverse weak immuned shelter pets as kids.

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7 hours ago, NeoConvict said:

Autism rates exploded when they expanded the spectrum to include more presentations. We have always had introverted paint lickers and those prone to violent outbursts, we just didn't label them autistic. 

There's plenty of research in the works. The jury is still out. 

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