Jump to content

Lifelong Republican despairs at watching the gop transform into ‘the evil party’


Recommended Posts

Lifelong Republican Matt Lewis has written a lengthy lament in the Daily Beast decrying the total moral collapse of the GOP during the impeachment hearings of President Donald Trump.

 

“The impeachment of Donald Trump demonstrated what still feels to me like a weird new development: The Republicans are the evil party, while Democrats (presumably now the ‘stupid party’?) seemed much more sane, moderate, and honorable,” he writes.

 

Lewis goes on to describe today’s GOP as “viscerally repellent” before delving further into Republicans’ depravity on display during the impeachment hearings.

 

 

“If you watched the debates during impeachment day, you know these are not honest brokers,” he continues. “Their talking points — which I’m assuming are poll-tested — were maudlin, offensive, and manipulative. The not-so-greatest-hits of Republican backbenchers included demanding a ‘moment of silence’ for the 63 million Americans who voted for Trump, comparing impeachment to Pearl Harbor, and comparing Trump to Jesus.”

 

The bottom line, writes Lewis, is that “Donald Trump’s Republican Party has adopted all the worst qualities I used to hate about the American left” and that “most of the so-called conservatives have followed Trump down the drain.”

Read the whole column here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Dude, they've been the Evil Party since the mid-1970s. They just feel invincible under their Orange Messiah, so they do it openly...

 

 

 

 

Everyone caught up in the Trump investigations

The long trail of legal news about President Trump's associates — which now includes the indictment and arrest of Roger Stone — makes it easy to lose track of the broader storyline of Robert Mueller's Russia investigation. Here's a map to help you keep every move straight.

How it works: The map shows the people have been convicted, pleaded guilty or charged. Go deeper for other key figures and moments of the investigation. Note that Cohen's first guilty plea and Manafort's conviction were on charges unrelated to Russia — but they highlight Trump's broader legal jeopardy.

 

Diagram: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Key events

Stone's arrest:

  • He was taken into custody in an early morning FBI raid in Florida Jan. 25 after being indicted on charges that lied about alleged communications with the Trump campaign about hacked emails possessed by WikiLeaks.

Cohen's guilty plea and sentence:

  • He pleaded guilty to eight counts related to tax fraud, making false statements to a financial institution, excessive campaign contributions, and unlawful corporate contributions. He said he was directed to violate campaign law at the direction of an unnamed candidate — implicating Trump.
  • In November, Cohen also pleaded guilty to lying to the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2017 about the length and scope of plans to build a Trump Tower in Moscow. He originally told the committee the work stopped in January 2016 and was not discussed with others in the Trump campaign. Mueller claims Cohen discussed getting Russian approval for the project as late as June 2016.
  • In December, Cohen was sentenced to 3 years in prison.

Russia:

Election interference:

  • 13 Russian nationals and 3 Russian entities were indicted on charges of violating criminal laws to interfere with the 2016 U.S. election.
    • On the same day, Mueller struck a plea deal with California resident Richard Pinedo who was accused of knowingly making tens of thousands of dollars by transferring hundreds of bank account numbers that were ultimately used to commit wire fraud.

The hacking:

  • 12 Russian military officers were indicted for hacking and releasing the emails of Democratic campaign organizations, including the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee, in an effort to interfere with the 2016 presidential election.

The Manafort verdict:

  • Manafort was found guilty on 8 criminal counts, including bank fraud, tax fraud and hiding a foreign bank account. The verdicts were focused on his activities as a lobbyist for Ukraine.
  • Mueller's team alleged Manafort violated his plea deal by lying repeatedly to federal investigators and the Mueller's team about his contact with the administration and a Russian.

Who's not on the list:

  • Donald Trump Jr. The bigger intrigue is about why there have been no reports that Mueller's team has questioned Trump Jr., given that he is a key player in one of the biggest events: the Trump Tower meeting with Manafort and Kushner. (He did testify before a Senate committee.)
  • President Trump has submitted written answers about pre-election dimensions of the Russia probe to Mueller's team, but did not answer questions about his behavior as president, including allegations of obstruction of justice.

This story has been updated with Stone's indictment and arrest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Corruption, greed, brazen lies, abused power of nixon, raygun and bush = trump

 

 

The administrations and legacies of Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush combine to tell a long, sorry tale of corruption, greed, brazen lies, abused power and religious fundamentalism gone wild that, in whole and in part, put us where we are today. Remove any one of those men from that painting, and from history, and Donald Trump would likely be just another late-night punchline you slept through, again. Nixon, Reagan and W. Bush made Donald Trump possible.

 

It is telling, and perhaps deliberate, that the painting finds Donald Trump seated at the right hand of Nixon. Who better than the Beast of San Clemente to frame the groaning reality of this White House? Richard Nixon’s “Southern Strategy” – courting brazen segregationists like South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond while stoking racial animosities wherever he and his fixers could find them – won him two presidential elections and greased the rails for every Republican presidential nominee to follow.

 

The construction of a Republican Electoral College fortress in the South began with Nixon and remains standing, very nearly brick for brick, to this day. Trump’s victory in 2016 happened because of that fortress. If he wins re-election in 2020, he will have Nixon’s deeply racist campaign strategy to thank once again. Beyond that, Nixon’s disdain for the rule of law, combined with his venomous hatred of the press, set the tone for the latter half of the 20th century and laid a precedent Trump has followed practically to the note.

 

Though he never served a day in prison for his crimes, thanks to a pardon from one of the other fellows featured in the painting, Richard Nixon was ultimately forced to pay a steep price for his transgressions. The same cannot be said for Ronald Reagan, whose administration sold missiles to Iran and used the proceeds to fund an illegal war in Central America. The Iran/Contra scandal was a vast, sweeping international affair for which the president eluded punishment by dint of 124 separate “I don’t remember” replies during the congressional inquiry.

 

Vivid public dishonesty by that president set yet another precedent Trump has taken full advantage of over the course of two long years. Lie straight to their faces, goes the thinking, and dare them to do something about it. The juggernaut rolls on.

Reagan’s most indelible imprint on the country, the one Trump has taken greatest advantage of, is cultural. He oversaw a rollicking festival of across-the-board deregulation while preaching the polluted gospel of trickle-down economics that endures to this day. Donald Trump came of age in the Reagan era, and learned the dark arts of the con man by watching the master in the White House.

 

Anyone who can say with a straight face that Trump has not benefitted from the mainline injection of racism into conventional Republican politics should immediately apply for a gig at the White House.

 

More than anything else, Reagan’s courting of what became known as the “Religious Right” changed the face of the country. Conservative Protestant evangelical leaders like Pat Robertson, Jerry Falwell and Billy Graham actively helped solidify and expand the religious fervor of the Republican base, creating one of the most reliable voter blocs in modern US history. Their legendary loyalty to the GOP, even in the face of myriad scandals and shameful episodes, has proven to be one of Donald Trump’s great strengths.

 

Another lasting Reagan legacy that Donald Trump has capitalized on is the muscular approach Reagan’s strategists took to Nixon’s racist “Southern Strategy.” Reagan adviser Lee Atwater, the infamous Southern Republican political operative who showed Karl Rove the ropes, explained during a 1981 interview the long, sure process of making virulent racism mainstream by hiding it in plain sight.

 

“You say stuff like, uh, forced busing, states’ rights, and all that stuff,” said Atwater, “and you’re getting so abstract. Now, you’re talking about cutting taxes, and all these things you’re talking about are totally economic things and a byproduct of them is, Blacks get hurt worse than whites. ‘We want to cut this,’ is much more abstract than even the busing thing.”

 

Anyone who can say with a straight face that Trump has not benefitted from the mainline injection of racism into conventional Republican politics should immediately apply for a gig at the White House. From Nixon to Reagan to Trump, the Republican “Southern Strategy” traded in the white robes of the Klan for a suit, a tie and some buzzwords to obscure the truth. The strategy has proven to be highly effective for the Republican Party, and toxic to the rest of the country, particularly to communities of color.

 

Sixteen years before the ascendancy of Donald Trump, George W. Bush adopted every fetid, discredited Nixon/Reagan ploy as his own. The 2000 GOP primary in South Carolina was a festival of racist gutter tactics that set Bush on course for the presidency, thanks entirely to the lessons Rove absorbed at Atwater’s knee. Bush survived the 2000 general election and was re-elected four years later, thanks in part to the thick white walls of that electoral fortress Nixon and Reagan built in the Southern states.

 

Like Nixon and Reagan, Bush had little use for the truth, and less use for observing the democratic norms that hold the republic together. Like Reagan, Bush embraced the power of the evangelical Christian right to the continued detriment of all. Nixon and Reagan lied about wars, but Bush lied us into a pair of wars that grind on to this day. Like his predecessors, George W. Bush paid no legal price for his serial crimes and astonishing dishonesty.

 

The rank racism of the “Southern Strategy.” The nonsense and classism of trickle-down economics. The grim fusion of politics and extremist evangelical Christianity. The bold power of the shameless lie. It has all flowed from Nixon to Reagan to Bush and finally to Trump, the inheritor of that poisoned estate. But for them, we would not have him. It’s all there in the painting, if you find your way to see it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They've always been evil. They're not trying to hide it anymore. They have been waiting for a corrupt racist leader to arise, and now that they have him, they ain't giving him up without a fight, even if it's means destroying the country they claim to love.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, benson13 said:

They've always been evil. They're not trying to hide it anymore. They have been waiting for a corrupt racist leader to arise, and now that they have him, they ain't giving him up without a fight, even if it's means destroying the country they claim to love.

 

Do you get paid by the post of utter BS? You must be doing quite well if that's the case.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a bit rich. Here's what I've witnessed over the last twelve years following US politics.

1. Liberals used to always have the moral high ground in debates about social issues. They would use reason and science to defend their arguments. Conservatives would just lean on the Bible for "evidence" of the righteousness of a policy. NOW, liberals are the ones ignoring scientific facts and appealing completely to emotional instincts. Conservatives are the ones who have to remind everyone that there are such thing as men and women, that children shouldn't dictate policy or be allowed to destroy their own bodies permanently because they're confused.

 

2. Liberals used to be anti-foreign war, anti-warrantless wiretapping, anti-drone strike...until Barack Obama supported and used all of them. Then, all of a sudden interfering with a foreign nation and overthrowing its leader is okay; drone-striking an American citizen to death is fine; the PATRIOT ACT is fine. How quickly did the liberals flip-flop on these morally righteous positions when one of their guys embraced the horrible policies they used to protest? Now, they're even defending the FBI fudging documents in their applications to spy on a US citizen, saying, "Some agents were just overzealous." Do you think a conservative would get away with such an absurd downplaying of a crime if, for example, the victim was a liberal and the president was a conservative?

 

3. Liberals would often criticize Democrats who supported the aforementioned causes, dismissing party loyalty for principled consistency. Those days are over. You are evil if you do or say anything that supports Trump. You are evil if you vote 'present' instead of jumping onto the dog pile. 

 

4. Republicans used to be the party of "How dare you speak to Russia like it's a country! What are you, a commie?" Now the Democrats have taken up the task of modern day McCarthyism. They don't believe in diplomacy anymore. They believe in war first, talk later. Case in point: Trump visiting DPRK, Trump speaking to Putin, Tulsi suggesting speaking to Assad before trying to overthrow him with war. To Democrats, this is all wrong. We're supposed to invade first. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/20/2019 at 10:05 AM, kking said:

That's a bit rich. Here's what I've witnessed over the last twelve years following US politics.

1. Liberals used to always have the moral high ground in debates about social issues. They would use reason and science to defend their arguments. Conservatives would just lean on the Bible for "evidence" of the righteousness of a policy. NOW, liberals are the ones ignoring scientific facts and appealing completely to emotional instincts. Conservatives are the ones who have to remind everyone that there are such thing as men and women, that children shouldn't dictate policy or be allowed to destroy their own bodies permanently because they're confused.

 

2. Liberals used to be anti-foreign war, anti-warrantless wiretapping, anti-drone strike...until Barack Obama supported and used all of them. Then, all of a sudden interfering with a foreign nation and overthrowing its leader is okay; drone-striking an American citizen to death is fine; the PATRIOT ACT is fine. How quickly did the liberals flip-flop on these morally righteous positions when one of their guys embraced the horrible policies they used to protest? Now, they're even defending the FBI fudging documents in their applications to spy on a US citizen, saying, "Some agents were just overzealous." Do you think a conservative would get away with such an absurd downplaying of a crime if, for example, the victim was a liberal and the president was a conservative?

 

3. Liberals would often criticize Democrats who supported the aforementioned causes, dismissing party loyalty for principled consistency. Those days are over. You are evil if you do or say anything that supports Trump. You are evil if you vote 'present' instead of jumping onto the dog pile. 

 

4. Republicans used to be the party of "How dare you speak to Russia like it's a country! What are you, a commie?" Now the Democrats have taken up the task of modern day McCarthyism. They don't believe in diplomacy anymore. They believe in war first, talk later. Case in point: Trump visiting DPRK, Trump speaking to Putin, Tulsi suggesting speaking to Assad before trying to overthrow him with war. To Democrats, this is all wrong. We're supposed to invade first. 

1) Global climate change: It's a hoax

2) send your thank you note to Dubya Bush who established the unitary presidency. Guess cons think that would only apply to future Republican presidents

3)blow your nose

4)pure hyperbole

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/20/2019 at 9:41 AM, benson13 said:

They've always been evil. They're not trying to hide it anymore. They have been waiting for a corrupt racist leader to arise, and now that they have him, they ain't giving him up without a fight, even if it's means destroying the country they claim to love.

 

The people of Truth, Freedom, Goodness, and Light.....will vote GOP.

The heathen Dems, on the other hand,......will not.                         🍹

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aside from Cabinet-level appointments, a ProPublica investigation found that at least 187 Trump political appointees have been federal lobbyists.

CREW slammed Trump for “filling the swamp with lobbyists” and special interests despite his repeated vow to “drain the swamp.”

 

“Trump’s actions upon taking office also demonstrate — despite the tough campaign rhetoric attacking Washington, D.C.’s ‘revolving door’ — not only an unwillingness to take on special interests, but a continued expansion of the influence of lobbyists on his administration,” the group said in a statement. “Trump has abjectly failed to ‘drain the swamp.’ To the contrary, he has repeatedly turned to industry insiders and lobbyists to advise him.”

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, benson13 said:

Aside from Cabinet-level appointments, a ProPublica investigation found that at least 187 Trump political appointees have been federal lobbyists.

CREW slammed Trump for “filling the swamp with lobbyists” and special interests despite his repeated vow to “drain the swamp.”

 

“Trump’s actions upon taking office also demonstrate — despite the tough campaign rhetoric attacking Washington, D.C.’s ‘revolving door’ — not only an unwillingness to take on special interests, but a continued expansion of the influence of lobbyists on his administration,” the group said in a statement. “Trump has abjectly failed to ‘drain the swamp.’ To the contrary, he has repeatedly turned to industry insiders and lobbyists to advise him.”

Draining the swamp means deporting brown people

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Zaro said:

1) Global climate change: It's a hoax

2) send your thank you note to Dubya Bush who established the unitary presidency. Guess cons think that would only apply to future Republican presidents

3)blow your nose

4)pure hyperbole

 

1. Good counter example, but I don't think AGW is quite as scientifically well-understood as male and female biology. 

2. Bush started that? He's the reason Obama was smoothly absorbed into the warhawk establishment?

3. What does that mean?

4. I gave specific examples of things Democrats criticized. How am I exaggerating if they're real examples?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...