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Freud Analyzes POTUS


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Freud Analyzes POTUS

 

Quite obviously, “The Father of Psychoanalysis,” Sigmund Freud, couldn’t have possibly psychoanalyzed POTUS because Freud had died some 7 years before POTUS was even born.  Yet, one could conjecture as to what Freud’s analysis of DJT might have been like.

 

Doctor Freud (chomping on a cigar; he had an oral fixation) might have said:

 

“Let me begin by briefly outlining my three parts of the psyche: id, ego, and superego.  The Id is present at birth.  It is based on “the pleasure principle”.  It is the impulsive, devil-may-care part of the personality.  It can be animal-like.  Id knows no restraints.  It seeks immediate gratification. The Id contains sexual and aggressive drives.  If it could talk, id would say: “I want what I want when I want it.” The id is what I called: “a seething cauldron of emotions.” 

 

“Second to develop is: the ego.  It is the rational, logical, “thinking” part of the personality.  It exists in what I call “the conscious mind”.  It is based on what I refer to as “the reality principle”.  Ego channels id’s disorganized energies into socially acceptable behavioral traits.  If it could talk, ego would say, “I will,” or “I will not.”  Ego would espouse: “Patience is a virtue.” 

 

“The last part of the three parts to develop is the superego.  Superego is, in a sense, “our conscience”.  It is the strict, rigid, and demanding part of our personalities.  It is the harsh ally of the ego.  “Superego” forces the ego to consider not just “real” approaches, but “ideal” ones.  It develops because we tend, by the time we enter elementary school, to begin to internalize the moral and ethical values of our parents and our surrounding culture.  Superego tends to see things as “right” or “wrong”; there are no shades of grey.  While the ego is willing to compromise, the superego is most reluctant to do so.  Superego seeks perfection.  It can be quite judgmental; it can cause a person to feel  guilt-ridden.  The superego can be repressive.  Stifling.  If it could talk, it would say, “You must,” or “You must not.”

 

“Moreover, based on the talks (free association) I’ve had with Mr. Trump, I have found him, primarily, to possess an “id-like” identity.  He tends to be ego-centric, self-centered and narcissistic.  He believes the world revolves around him.  You could call it a neologism: a “Trumpocentric” Universe”.   It’s “Me-Me-Me-Me.”  He is saying, “I am and must be the center of attention.  I must be in the limelight.  I won’t share the stage with anyone.  No one will dare upstage me, though I will upstage others.   He can be quite inflexible, that is unless he’s absolutely-positively forced to do so, and then, only after “kicking and screaming”.   In fact, he considers himself to be the ringmaster, barker, and drum-major, all rolled into one. 

 

“Further, his actions seem to know no bounds.  He does what he wants when he wants to.  He shows very little restraint.  That despite pleas from his advisors and associates that he consider other strategies (he doesn’t like to hear alternative viewpoints; he certainly doesn’t like to take orders).   He has a tendency to portray himself as an intimidating, menacing, full-of-bluster (don’t cross me), bully-like individual.  He feels privileged.  His devil-may-care, live-it-up attitude is evidenced by his past pursuits of feminine relationships.  He’s fixated on women’s bodies.  The perfect body-type, at least in his eyes. 

 

“For years, his adventuresome distaff pursuits bordered on both the insatiable and unrestrained.  With apologies to the late Gwen Verdon in “Damn Yankees,” his attitude has been: “Whatever POTUS wants, POTUS gets.”  Simply stated, his approach appears to be: “My way or the highway.”  What?  Me Wrong.  Never!

 

“Further, he can be impulsive.  He is also prone to taking ill-advised risks (It is one thing to take risks as a corporate leader; yet, it’s whole ‘nother “ball-game” to do so as President of the United States.).  He is self-promoting.  He can easily be angered.  The above traits are all emblematic of an “id-like” individual.

 

“Furthermore, in reference to POTUS, the ego has a help in dealing with what could be labeled as subconscious impulses, i.e., id.  These subconscious impulses are collectively called: “defense mechanisms”.  One of the key mechanisms that appears to be employed by POTUS is called “projection”.  “Projection” occurs when we subconsciously disguise threatening impulses by attributing them to others.  For example, if someone were to say, “He hates me.”  He may well be indicating, “I hate him,” or “I hate myself.”  One might call this “blame-shifting”.

 

“Yes, POTUS does have a habit of shifting the blame onto others.  In other words, he subconsciously (he doesn’t realize he’s doing this) “projects” his own unacceptable feelings and emotions onto someone else, or a group of individuals, rather than admitting to or dealing with his unwanted feelings and emotions. I n a way, he is saying, “They have failed me,” when he might well be saying, “I have failed myself.”

 

“For example, say someone cheats on his/her income taxes.  They are caught falsifying data.  They are brought before an IRS examiner.  When asked about it, they say, “Everyone cheats on their taxes.”  In a sense, they are unburdening themselves.  They are taking their guilt and foisting that guilt onto others.  In another case, a student does poorly in a particular class.  When asked about it, the student says, “It’s the teacher’s fault.  He/She didn’t teach me well.”  The real reason may well have been that the student didn’t apply himself.  He/She may not have studied.  

 

“Furthermore, in the case of the bully, he/she is projecting their own feelings of inadequacy, vulnerability, etc. on to others, i.e., name-calling, to make up for their own feelings of inadequacy.  Finally, on this matter, in extreme situations, “projection” helps the fragile “ego” reduce anxiety, but at the possible risk of personality fragmentation with the resultant development of “alters” as seen cases of dissociative identity disorder.

 

“Finally, there may be some oedipal considerations, but I’ll leave that for another time.  It’s time to light up another cigar.”

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1 hour ago, Doobie said:

Freud Analyzes POTUS

 

Quite obviously, “The Father of Psychoanalysis,” Sigmund Freud, couldn’t have possibly psychoanalyzed POTUS because Freud had died some 7 years before POTUS was even born.  Yet, one could conjecture as to what Freud’s analysis of DJT might have been like.

 

Doctor Freud (chomping on a cigar; he had an oral fixation) might have said:

 

“Let me begin by briefly outlining my three parts of the psyche: id, ego, and superego.  The Id is present at birth.  It is based on “the pleasure principle”.  It is the impulsive, devil-may-care part of the personality.  It can be animal-like.  Id knows no restraints.  It seeks immediate gratification. The Id contains sexual and aggressive drives.  If it could talk, id would say: “I want what I want when I want it.” The id is what I called: “a seething cauldron of emotions.” 

 

“Second to develop is: the ego.  It is the rational, logical, “thinking” part of the personality.  It exists in what I call “the conscious mind”.  It is based on what I refer to as “the reality principle”.  Ego channels id’s disorganized energies into socially acceptable behavioral traits.  If it could talk, ego would say, “I will,” or “I will not.”  Ego would espouse: “Patience is a virtue.” 

 

“The last part of the three parts to develop is the superego.  Superego is, in a sense, “our conscience”.  It is the strict, rigid, and demanding part of our personalities.  It is the harsh ally of the ego.  “Superego” forces the ego to consider not just “real” approaches, but “ideal” ones.  It develops because we tend, by the time we enter elementary school, to begin to internalize the moral and ethical values of our parents and our surrounding culture.  Superego tends to see things as “right” or “wrong”; there are no shades of grey.  While the ego is willing to compromise, the superego is most reluctant to do so.  Superego seeks perfection.  It can be quite judgmental; it can cause a person to feel  guilt-ridden.  The superego can be repressive.  Stifling.  If it could talk, it would say, “You must,” or “You must not.”

 

“Moreover, based on the talks (free association) I’ve had with Mr. Trump, I have found him, primarily, to possess an “id-like” identity.  He tends to be ego-centric, self-centered and narcissistic.  He believes the world revolves around him.  You could call it a neologism: a “Trumpocentric” Universe”.   It’s “Me-Me-Me-Me.”  He is saying, “I am and must be the center of attention.  I must be in the limelight.  I won’t share the stage with anyone.  No one will dare upstage me, though I will upstage others.   He can be quite inflexible, that is unless he’s absolutely-positively forced to do so, and then, only after “kicking and screaming”.   In fact, he considers himself to be the ringmaster, barker, and drum-major, all rolled into one. 

 

“Further, his actions seem to know no bounds.  He does what he wants when he wants to.  He shows very little restraint.  That despite pleas from his advisors and associates that he consider other strategies (he doesn’t like to hear alternative viewpoints; he certainly doesn’t like to take orders).   He has a tendency to portray himself as an intimidating, menacing, full-of-bluster (don’t cross me), bully-like individual.  He feels privileged.  His devil-may-care, live-it-up attitude is evidenced by his past pursuits of feminine relationships.  He’s fixated on women’s bodies.  The perfect body-type, at least in his eyes. 

 

“For years, his adventuresome distaff pursuits bordered on both the insatiable and unrestrained.  With apologies to the late Gwen Verdon in “Damn Yankees,” his attitude has been: “Whatever POTUS wants, POTUS gets.”  Simply stated, his approach appears to be: “My way or the highway.”  What?  Me Wrong.  Never!

 

“Further, he can be impulsive.  He is also prone to taking ill-advised risks (It is one thing to take risks as a corporate leader; yet, it’s whole ‘nother “ball-game” to do so as President of the United States.).  He is self-promoting.  He can easily be angered.  The above traits are all emblematic of an “id-like” individual.

 

“Furthermore, in reference to POTUS, the ego has a help in dealing with what could be labeled as subconscious impulses, i.e., id.  These subconscious impulses are collectively called: “defense mechanisms”.  One of the key mechanisms that appears to be employed by POTUS is called “projection”.  “Projection” occurs when we subconsciously disguise threatening impulses by attributing them to others.  For example, if someone were to say, “He hates me.”  He may well be indicating, “I hate him,” or “I hate myself.”  One might call this “blame-shifting”.

 

“Yes, POTUS does have a habit of shifting the blame onto others.  In other words, he subconsciously (he doesn’t realize he’s doing this) “projects” his own unacceptable feelings and emotions onto someone else, or a group of individuals, rather than admitting to or dealing with his unwanted feelings and emotions. I n a way, he is saying, “They have failed me,” when he might well be saying, “I have failed myself.”

 

“For example, say someone cheats on his/her income taxes.  They are caught falsifying data.  They are brought before an IRS examiner.  When asked about it, they say, “Everyone cheats on their taxes.”  In a sense, they are unburdening themselves.  They are taking their guilt and foisting that guilt onto others.  In another case, a student does poorly in a particular class.  When asked about it, the student says, “It’s the teacher’s fault.  He/She didn’t teach me well.”  The real reason may well have been that the student didn’t apply himself.  He/She may not have studied.  

 

“Furthermore, in the case of the bully, he/she is projecting their own feelings of inadequacy, vulnerability, etc. on to others, i.e., name-calling, to make up for their own feelings of inadequacy.  Finally, on this matter, in extreme situations, “projection” helps the fragile “ego” reduce anxiety, but at the possible risk of personality fragmentation with the resultant development of “alters” as seen cases of dissociative identity disorder.

 

“Finally, there may be some oedipal considerations, but I’ll leave that for another time.  It’s time to light up another cigar.”

Hi Phoenix.

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