Jump to content

Uh oh House Democrat says he plans to vote against all articles of impeachment


Recommended Posts

House Democrat says he plans to vote against all articles of impeachment

By Manu Raju and Jeremy Herb, CNN

 

Updated 7:47 PM ET, Thu December 5, 2019 

 
Should Trump be impeached? These scholars disagree
 
 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Constitutional scholars (L-R) Noah Feldman of Harvard University, Pamela Karlan of Stanford University, Michael Gerhardt of the University of North Carolina, and Jonathan Turley of George Washington University testify before the House Judiciary Committee in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill December 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. This is the first hearing held by the House Judiciary Committee in the impeachment inquiry against U.S. President Donald Trump, whom House Democrats say held back military aid for Ukraine while demanding it investigate his political rivals. The Judiciary Committee will decide whether to draft official articles of impeachment against President Trump to be voted on by the full House of Representatives.

 

191205121352-kevin-mccarthy-weekly-press

 

This grab made from a video shows Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte (L), French President Emmanuel Macron (front),  British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (R) and Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (back-C) as the leaders of Britain, Canada, France and the Netherlands were caught on camera at a Buckingham Palace reception appearing to joke about US President Donald Trump's lengthy media appearances ahead of the NATO summit on December 3, 2019 in London.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Constitutional scholars (L-R) Noah Feldman of Harvard University, Pamela Karlan of Stanford University, Michael Gerhardt of the University of North Carolina, and Jonathan Turley of George Washington University testify before the House Judiciary Committee in the Longworth House Office Building on Capitol Hill December 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. This is the first hearing held by the House Judiciary Committee in the impeachment inquiry against U.S. President Donald Trump, whom House Democrats say held back military aid for Ukraine while demanding it investigate his political rivals. The Judiciary Committee will decide whether to draft official articles of impeachment against President Trump to be voted on by the full House of Representatives.

 

191205121352-kevin-mccarthy-weekly-press

 

This grab made from a video shows Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte (L), French President Emmanuel Macron (front),  British Prime Minister Boris Johnson (R) and Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (back-C) as the leaders of Britain, Canada, France and the Netherlands were caught on camera at a Buckingham Palace reception appearing to joke about US President Donald Trump's lengthy media appearances ahead of the NATO summit on December 3, 2019 in London.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(CNN)Rep. Jeff Van Drew of New Jersey, one of two Democrats to vote against formalizing the impeachment inquiry, said he plans to vote against all the articles of impeachment "unless there's something that I haven't seen, haven't heard before." 

He warned Democrats to "be careful what you wish for" and he added that impeachment "is tearing the nation apart. ... And I want to bring people together."
Rep. Jeff Van Drew, a Democrat from New Jersey, speaks at a news conference on Wednesday.
 
Rep. Jeff Van Drew, a Democrat from New Jersey, speaks at a news conference on Wednesday. 
Van Drew, whose district voted for Trump in 2016, said he would have preferred a censure vote on Trump so they could "move on." Van Drew was first elected in 2018, winning a seat that was previously GOP controlled. 
Minnesota Rep. Collin Peterson, the other Democrat who also opposed the inquiry, was also asked if he'd vote to impeach.
 
 
 
"I don't have an idea what they're doing," Peterson said.
Moderate Democrats, particularly those in Trump-leaning districts, resisted moving forward on an impeachment inquiry throughout much of the year, as liberal Democrats pushed for Congress to take up special counsel Robert Mueller's report to launch an impeachment inquiry. That all changed in September when House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced a narrow impeachment inquiry to investigate the Ukraine allegations, and nearly every House Democrat publicly backed it.
Pelosi at a news conference on Thursday morning dismissed the notion she was concerned about her moderates facing blowback for impeachment.
 
"This has absolutely nothing to do with politics," she said.
A simple majority is needed to impeach in the House where Democrats have a 233-197 advantage.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...