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Ranb

Precision Air Rifle Shooting

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Several years ago I got involved with a shooting team that currently uses air rifles like these;

 

Anschutz 8001 pre-charged pneumatic.

Anschutz-8001-Club-ANS-010695-rifle-zm1.

Feinwerkbau 600 single stroke pneumatic.

fwb-600.jpg

 

Buying the rifles is rather expensive ($500-$1500) even for entry level rifles.  But the pellets are only $6/500 up to about $12/500.  Olympic sized targets are about 8 cents each.

 

Anyone else shoot target air rifles?

 

Ranb

 

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Quote

NO CRAWL INTO YOUR PARENTS BASEMENT!

Dude, how right you are!  10-meter air rifle is an indoor sport.  40 feet in the basement is perfect for an indoor air rifle range.

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Although I never formally competed, I like to practice, in the garage, with my .22 cal, Gamo Silent Cat air rifle.  One break of the barrel generates surprising power.  And using heavier pellets eliminates a sonic crack.  Still, the rifle is plenty loud.  However the large silencer doubles as a comfortable handle to break the barrel.

 

With my 1.25X to 4X Trijicon scope mounted on top, truly precision accuracy is possible if the shooter does his part. 

 

                                                                  The rifle:

Image result for gamo silent cat air rifle images
Image result for gamo silent cat air rifle images

                                                        The scope reticle:

Image result for trijicon post reticle images
 
 
 
 
 
The red, tritium triangle is illuminated by fiber optics in daylight and glows by itself, at night.  I like this scope/rifle combo a lot.  You can get in lots of cheap and fun practice in your own home !

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I made a monocore insert for some of my air rifles.  The rifled portion of the barrel ends about nine inches from the end of the barrel.  I machined a piece of PVC rod about 0.6" wide and cut holes across it for the air to expand into.  Since an air rifle is legally not a firearm, my monocore is not a silencer part that needs to be registered.  It lowers the sound level a lot.  I made a video, but it does not do the sound reduction any justice.

 

My 8001 and T200 rifles readily accept scopes, but I think the diopter sights are just as accurate given a round target of the right size at a known distance.

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1 hour ago, Ranb said:

I made a monocore insert for some of my air rifles.  The rifled portion of the barrel ends about nine inches from the end of the barrel.  I machined a piece of PVC rod about 0.6" wide and cut holes across it for the air to expand into.  Since an air rifle is legally not a firearm, my monocore is not a silencer part that needs to be registered.  It lowers the sound level a lot.  I made a video, but it does not do the sound reduction any justice.

 

Very kewl.  I would still like to see the vid.  Might learn something.

 

1 hour ago, Ranb said:

My 8001 and T200 rifles readily accept scopes, but I think the diopter sights are just as accurate given a round target of the right size at a known distance.

 

Although this model of Gamo rifle is quality made, the rear plastic diopter sight was truly crapola.  It rattled around enough to make adjustments a joke.  I ended up removing the front and rear sights and mounted the scope which provides greater flexibility and far faster acquisition;  At the expense of weight and bulk, of course.

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A simple, quick installation !  Little added weight.  No alteration to the appearance of the rifle even.  And I'm guessing the moderator has little or no effect of pellet velocity?  Very good.

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The pellet does not touch the monocore; if it did, then accuracy would be very poor.  This is a ten meter air rifle, about all it is good for with the usual sights is ten meter (33 feet) shooting at the usual Olympic style target.

 

As it was, the .25 inch bore degraded accuracy for some reason.  This rifle will put ten 4.5 millimeter pellets into a single hole 7 millimeters wide.  I increased the bore of the monocore to .3 inches to solve this problem.  There is no effect on pellet velocity.

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1 hour ago, Ranb said:

As it was, the .25 inch bore degraded accuracy for some reason.  This rifle will put ten 4.5 millimeter pellets into a single hole 7 millimeters wide.  I increased the bore of the monocore to .3 inches to solve this problem.  There is no effect on pellet velocity.

 

The pellet might have slightly grazed the monocore before you widened it.  Sorry I'm not into competition shooting.

 

As a teenager, my first gun was a .22 cal. single shot, Crossman pump-up pistol which I used to hunt small game ... Lots of compensation for drop and windage.  Later, the power of a quality, German air rifle impressed me no end.  And shortly thereafter, a .22LR seemed astounding.  In the Army, I fired my first 30-06 and .45ACP, and have been a gun enthusiast ever since.

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More likely it was air turbulence in the monocore that was responsible.  The groups only opened up less than one millimeter.

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There are bound to be small variations in break-barrel lineup from shot to shot.   So break-barrel air rifles, like Gamo, with the rear sight or scope mounted behind the barrel are somewhat less accurate than a side-lever or under-lever design.  Or pre-charged design like Anschutz.

 

Still, not being a competitive shooter.  And never shooting from a benchrest, except to zero in, I perceive my scoped break-barrel Gamo to be incredibly accurate.  Certainly more than adequate for small game at typically short air rifle distances.  I am very fond of my Gamo air rifle.

 

Anschutz target models are wonderful, precision instruments for those who enjoy utilizing their special capabilities.  They're just not my cup of tea.

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On 11/2/2019 at 7:10 PM, Ranb said:

Several years ago I got involved with a shooting team that currently uses air rifles like these;

 

Anschutz 8001 pre-charged pneumatic.

Anschutz-8001-Club-ANS-010695-rifle-zm1.

Feinwerkbau 600 single stroke pneumatic.

fwb-600.jpg

 

Buying the rifles is rather expensive ($500-$1500) even for entry level rifles.  But the pellets are only $6/500 up to about $12/500.  Olympic sized targets are about 8 cents each.

 

Anyone else shoot target air rifles?

 

Ranb

 

Their 22 LR target rifles are just as expensive. Nice rifles though. 

 

I have fired air rifles before and everything including how you hold it supposed to be different. I couldn't get into it. 

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The prone, kneeling, offhand and sitting positions for small bore and air rifle are exactly the same.  The clothing and other equipment rules are the same other than the specifications for the rifle.  Those who excel at air rifle usually do very well in small bore.  In fact women frequently out shoot the men in air rifle as at the upper levels of competition it is off hand only.  The female build with the wider hips and shorter torso means they can rest their elbow on their hip while the men have to settle for their upper arm against their rib cage.

 

If the men were competing with the women at the last Olympics, the best male shooter in the world would have had to settle for a bronze medal.

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On 11/18/2019 at 8:55 AM, Ranb said:

The prone, kneeling, offhand and sitting positions for small bore and air rifle are exactly the same.  The clothing and other equipment rules are the same other than the specifications for the rifle.  Those who excel at air rifle usually do very well in small bore.  In fact women frequently out shoot the men in air rifle as at the upper levels of competition it is off hand only.  The female build with the wider hips and shorter torso means they can rest their elbow on their hip while the men have to settle for their upper arm against their rib cage.

 

If the men were competing with the women at the last Olympics, the best male shooter in the world would have had to settle for a bronze medal.

I've thought about buying a PCP rifle many times.  The big holdback for me was filling the air reservoir.  I refuse to go to a scuba shop to get this done. And, I'm not going to use a hand-pump to keep it filled either.  Now, I see that on Ebay, you can buy high-presser electric pumps for about $200.  I'd want to know more about these cheap pumps before buying an expensive PCP rifle.  But, as far as i can tell, that's what I've been waiting for. 

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On 11/22/2019 at 11:57 AM, Skans said:

I've thought about buying a PCP rifle many times.  The big holdback for me was filling the air reservoir.  I refuse to go to a scuba shop to get this done. And, I'm not going to use a hand-pump to keep it filled either.  Now, I see that on Ebay, you can buy high-presser electric pumps for about $200.  I'd want to know more about these cheap pumps before buying an expensive PCP rifle.  But, as far as i can tell, that's what I've been waiting for. 

Most PCP shooters use a 3000 psi or 3500 psi scuba tank to fill their rifle cylinders.  When the cylinder goes below about 2500 psi, they go to the scuba shop to get it re-filled.  A 80 cubic foot 3000 psi scuba tank will provide enough air for thousands of shots; but it will only top off the rifle's 2900 psi cylinder a few times before it goes below 2900 psi.  This is normally not a problem as the cylinder can go down to about 1500 psi and hardly affect the pellet velocity at all since the action is regulated.

 

Do not buy a compressor until you have seen on being used and know how reliable it is.  I'm thinking of buying on to attach to a 3000 psi scuba tank to keep it topped off at the range.  Some of the cheaper ones are only good for filling a single cylinder in ten minutes then cooling off for a while.  You may also need a high pressure air drier to go with it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

psi

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