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DOJ, DHS Issue New 'Third Country' Rule Making US Asylum Nearly Impossible

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It is difficult to argue against the logic of this rule. Those truly fleeing persecution seek asylum in the nearest country willing to accept them. But those from Central America are heading through several countries to get to the United States. It could be because we offer the most generous benefits.

 

 

But I am going to hold off judgement until I hear the opposition's objections.
 

 

https://inhomelandsecurity.com/doj-dhs-issue-new-third-country-rule-making-us-asylum-nearly-impossible/

(Full article at above link)

 

 

On July 15, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that it would be publishing a joint rule with the Department of Justice (DOJ) that would dramatically limit the ability of migrants to seek asylum in the United States. As of July 16, any migrants en route to the United States will be required to seek asylum in a country they are transiting, which is usually Mexico. The only way they can request asylum in the United States is if they can show proof that their asylum request was denied by the third country.

 

Reducing the Burden on the US Immigration System

DHS Acting Secretary Kevin McAleenan stated in a press release, “Until Congress can act, this interim rule will help reduce a major ‘pull factor’ driving irregular migration to the United States and enable DHS and DOJ to more quickly and efficiently process cases originating from the southern border, leading to fewer individuals transiting through Mexico on a dangerous journey.” He also indicated that the rule will reduce the burden on the U.S. immigration system caused by asylum seekers failing to request asylum in the first available country, as well as “economic migrants lacking a legitimate fear of persecution.”

This is not the first time the Trump administration has attempted to severely limit the ability of migrants to request asylum in the United States. In November 2018, the White House attempted to ban people who cross the U.S.-Mexico border between ports of entry from entering the asylum process, limiting asylum requests to official border crossings.

However, U.S. immigration law clearly states that anyone can request asylum from anywhere on U.S. soil. Just three days later, a federal judge from the Northern District of California ruled against the asylum ban and issued a temporary injunction. In late December, the Supreme Court refused to allow the administration to enforce the policy.

 

Migration Protection Protocols

In January, the Trump administration also enacted the Migration Protection Protocols (MPP), under which migrants requesting asylum are sent to Mexico to await their immigration hearings. This wait can take up to a year or more, and many migrants have taken advantage of Mexico’s offer to bus them back to their home countries if they cannot wait that long. Although Mexico was designated as a safe country for the purpose of the MPP, President Trump has contradicted this in statements and speeches, calling Mexico “one of the most dangerous countries in the world.”

Trump and DHS have been trying to reach a formal “safe third country” asylum agreement with Mexico and Guatemala with mixed results. Mexico, which has refused to sign such an agreement in the past, agreed to do so if they could not significantly reduce the number of Central Americans arriving at the U.S. border. Assessments of this would occur in two intervals of 45 days, and the first deadline is on July 25.

Hours before DHS issued the press release, Guatemala’s constitutional court blocked President Morales from immediately declaring Guatemala as a safe third country for asylum seekers. According to Reuters, Morales had been widely expected to sign this agreement at a now-postponed summit with Trump in Washington, DC.

 

Will This New Ban Work?

Given that neither Mexico nor Guatemala have formally signed a “safe third country” agreement with the United States, it is unclear how DHS plans to enforce this new rule. There are three exceptions to the rule, and the most significant one in this case is the denial of asylum applications in transit countries.

Although Mexico has granted asylum to many applicants flooding its border over the last year, it can lawfully refuse these requests as pushback to the United States. If migrants can show that both Guatemala and Mexico denied their asylum claims, which they are more likely to do now since no agreement has been signed, this may not reduce asylum requests at the U.S. border at all.

 

 

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There are many other reasons. First of all MANY of them are running from the cartel influence in their countries which often basically run those countries and those SAME CARTELS have a big presence in Mexico. So for instance  I saw one woman running from her home in Guatemala because she took out a loan from a cartel run bank. Her business failed and the Cartel told her she had one month to repay the loan or they would kill her or her son.  Mexico is infested with this EXACT same drug cartel so she an find no asylum there.

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14 minutes ago, Debs said:

There are many other reasons. First of all MANY of them are running from the cartel influence in their countries which often basically run those countries and those SAME CARTELS have a big presence in Mexico. So for instance  I saw one woman running from her home in Guatemala because she took out a loan from a cartel run bank. Her business failed and the Cartel told her she had one month to repay the loan or they would kill her or her son.  Mexico is infested with this EXACT same drug cartel so she an find no asylum there.

SHUT UP YOU SNIVELING PUNK

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1 hour ago, drvoke said:

 

 

Image result for DOJ, DHS Issue New 'Third Country' Rule Making US Asylum Nearly Impossible

 

 

 

It is difficult to argue against the logic of this rule. Those truly fleeing persecution seek asylum in the nearest country willing to accept them. But those from Central America are heading through several countries to get to the United States. It could be because we offer the most generous benefits.

 

 

But I am going to hold off judgement until I hear the opposition's objections.
 

 

https://inhomelandsecurity.com/doj-dhs-issue-new-third-country-rule-making-us-asylum-nearly-impossible/

(Full article at above link)

 

 

On July 15, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that it would be publishing a joint rule with the Department of Justice (DOJ) that would dramatically limit the ability of migrants to seek asylum in the United States. As of July 16, any migrants en route to the United States will be required to seek asylum in a country they are transiting, which is usually Mexico. The only way they can request asylum in the United States is if they can show proof that their asylum request was denied by the third country.

 

Reducing the Burden on the US Immigration System

DHS Acting Secretary Kevin McAleenan stated in a press release, “Until Congress can act, this interim rule will help reduce a major ‘pull factor’ driving irregular migration to the United States and enable DHS and DOJ to more quickly and efficiently process cases originating from the southern border, leading to fewer individuals transiting through Mexico on a dangerous journey.” He also indicated that the rule will reduce the burden on the U.S. immigration system caused by asylum seekers failing to request asylum in the first available country, as well as “economic migrants lacking a legitimate fear of persecution.”

This is not the first time the Trump administration has attempted to severely limit the ability of migrants to request asylum in the United States. In November 2018, the White House attempted to ban people who cross the U.S.-Mexico border between ports of entry from entering the asylum process, limiting asylum requests to official border crossings.

However, U.S. immigration law clearly states that anyone can request asylum from anywhere on U.S. soil. Just three days later, a federal judge from the Northern District of California ruled against the asylum ban and issued a temporary injunction. In late December, the Supreme Court refused to allow the administration to enforce the policy.

 

Migration Protection Protocols

In January, the Trump administration also enacted the Migration Protection Protocols (MPP), under which migrants requesting asylum are sent to Mexico to await their immigration hearings. This wait can take up to a year or more, and many migrants have taken advantage of Mexico’s offer to bus them back to their home countries if they cannot wait that long. Although Mexico was designated as a safe country for the purpose of the MPP, President Trump has contradicted this in statements and speeches, calling Mexico “one of the most dangerous countries in the world.”

Trump and DHS have been trying to reach a formal “safe third country” asylum agreement with Mexico and Guatemala with mixed results. Mexico, which has refused to sign such an agreement in the past, agreed to do so if they could not significantly reduce the number of Central Americans arriving at the U.S. border. Assessments of this would occur in two intervals of 45 days, and the first deadline is on July 25.

Hours before DHS issued the press release, Guatemala’s constitutional court blocked President Morales from immediately declaring Guatemala as a safe third country for asylum seekers. According to Reuters, Morales had been widely expected to sign this agreement at a now-postponed summit with Trump in Washington, DC.

 

Will This New Ban Work?

Given that neither Mexico nor Guatemala have formally signed a “safe third country” agreement with the United States, it is unclear how DHS plans to enforce this new rule. There are three exceptions to the rule, and the most significant one in this case is the denial of asylum applications in transit countries.

Although Mexico has granted asylum to many applicants flooding its border over the last year, it can lawfully refuse these requests as pushback to the United States. If migrants can show that both Guatemala and Mexico denied their asylum claims, which they are more likely to do now since no agreement has been signed, this may not reduce asylum requests at the U.S. border at all.

 

 

Excellent policy. 

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1 hour ago, Debs said:

There are many other reasons. First of all MANY of them are running from the cartel influence in their countries which often basically run those countries and those SAME CARTELS have a big presence in Mexico. So for instance  I saw one woman running from her home in Guatemala because she took out a loan from a cartel run bank. Her business failed and the Cartel told her she had one month to repay the loan or they would kill her or her son.  Mexico is infested with this EXACT same drug cartel so she an find no asylum there.

Little Debbie thinks her anecdotal evidence means something. 🤣

 

Is doesn’t, bitch. 

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2 hours ago, Debs said:

There are many other reasons. First of all MANY of them are running from the cartel influence in their countries which often basically run those countries and those SAME CARTELS have a big presence in Mexico. So for instance  I saw one woman running from her home in Guatemala because she took out a loan from a cartel run bank. Her business failed and the Cartel told her she had one month to repay the loan or they would kill her or her son.  Mexico is infested with this EXACT same drug cartel so she an find no asylum there.

 

A valid concern.

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4 hours ago, drvoke said:

 

It is difficult to argue against the logic of this rule. Those truly fleeing persecution seek asylum in the nearest country willing to accept them. But those from Central America are heading through several countries to get to the United States. It could be because we offer the most generous benefits.

 

 

But I am going to hold off judgement until I hear the opposition's objections.

I don't believe you at all. This is typical you had your ideology discredited and you are waiting for the opportunity to discredit those that exposed your corruption because you know every reality corrupts how life actually keeps lifetimes eternally sorted apart now. Disciples of doubt never explain natural existence honestly.  you are a perfect example of that type of intellectual behavior.

 

Common instincts since conception vs common sense narratives formulated after birth. I know the difference.

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4 hours ago, drvoke said:

 

 

Image result for DOJ, DHS Issue New 'Third Country' Rule Making US Asylum Nearly Impossible

 

 

 

It is difficult to argue against the logic of this rule. Those truly fleeing persecution seek asylum in the nearest country willing to accept them. But those from Central America are heading through several countries to get to the United States. It could be because we offer the most generous benefits.

 

 

But I am going to hold off judgement until I hear the opposition's objections.
 

 

https://inhomelandsecurity.com/doj-dhs-issue-new-third-country-rule-making-us-asylum-nearly-impossible/

(Full article at above link)

 

 

On July 15, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that it would be publishing a joint rule with the Department of Justice (DOJ) that would dramatically limit the ability of migrants to seek asylum in the United States. As of July 16, any migrants en route to the United States will be required to seek asylum in a country they are transiting, which is usually Mexico. The only way they can request asylum in the United States is if they can show proof that their asylum request was denied by the third country.

 

Reducing the Burden on the US Immigration System

DHS Acting Secretary Kevin McAleenan stated in a press release, “Until Congress can act, this interim rule will help reduce a major ‘pull factor’ driving irregular migration to the United States and enable DHS and DOJ to more quickly and efficiently process cases originating from the southern border, leading to fewer individuals transiting through Mexico on a dangerous journey.” He also indicated that the rule will reduce the burden on the U.S. immigration system caused by asylum seekers failing to request asylum in the first available country, as well as “economic migrants lacking a legitimate fear of persecution.”

This is not the first time the Trump administration has attempted to severely limit the ability of migrants to request asylum in the United States. In November 2018, the White House attempted to ban people who cross the U.S.-Mexico border between ports of entry from entering the asylum process, limiting asylum requests to official border crossings.

However, U.S. immigration law clearly states that anyone can request asylum from anywhere on U.S. soil. Just three days later, a federal judge from the Northern District of California ruled against the asylum ban and issued a temporary injunction. In late December, the Supreme Court refused to allow the administration to enforce the policy.

 

Migration Protection Protocols

In January, the Trump administration also enacted the Migration Protection Protocols (MPP), under which migrants requesting asylum are sent to Mexico to await their immigration hearings. This wait can take up to a year or more, and many migrants have taken advantage of Mexico’s offer to bus them back to their home countries if they cannot wait that long. Although Mexico was designated as a safe country for the purpose of the MPP, President Trump has contradicted this in statements and speeches, calling Mexico “one of the most dangerous countries in the world.”

Trump and DHS have been trying to reach a formal “safe third country” asylum agreement with Mexico and Guatemala with mixed results. Mexico, which has refused to sign such an agreement in the past, agreed to do so if they could not significantly reduce the number of Central Americans arriving at the U.S. border. Assessments of this would occur in two intervals of 45 days, and the first deadline is on July 25.

Hours before DHS issued the press release, Guatemala’s constitutional court blocked President Morales from immediately declaring Guatemala as a safe third country for asylum seekers. According to Reuters, Morales had been widely expected to sign this agreement at a now-postponed summit with Trump in Washington, DC.

 

Will This New Ban Work?

Given that neither Mexico nor Guatemala have formally signed a “safe third country” agreement with the United States, it is unclear how DHS plans to enforce this new rule. There are three exceptions to the rule, and the most significant one in this case is the denial of asylum applications in transit countries.

Although Mexico has granted asylum to many applicants flooding its border over the last year, it can lawfully refuse these requests as pushback to the United States. If migrants can show that both Guatemala and Mexico denied their asylum claims, which they are more likely to do now since no agreement has been signed, this may not reduce asylum requests at the U.S. border at all.

 

 

Asylum claims are being abused. There needs to be clear rules on who can apply. Fleeing for economic reasons should not be tolerated.

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On 7/26/2019 at 3:52 AM, DeepBreath said:

Excellent policy. 

 Until the first country tells them that isn't law here.

 So you guys keep heading north.

 Hilarious actually.

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1 minute ago, Squatchman said:

 Until the first country tells them that isn't law here.

 So you guys keep heading north.

 Hilarious actually.

And we’ll send them back per the law here, idiot. 

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3 minutes ago, DeepBreath said:

And we’ll send them back per the law here, idiot. 

  Nope.

 First they get to apply for asylum then get an appeal if the ruling isn't in their favor.

 

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On 7/26/2019 at 6:12 AM, DeepBreath said:

You said that just to spite me. 😂

 

It was about 50/50. LOL

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36 minutes ago, Squatchman said:

  Nope.

 First they get to apply for asylum then get an appeal if the ruling isn't in their favor.

 

We can change that too. 

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1 minute ago, DeepBreath said:

We can change that too. 

  Better get after it then huh?

Until that time this new ruling is just more hot air being blown up your skirt by trump.

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Just now, Squatchman said:

  Better get after it then huh?

Until that time this new ruling is just more hot air being blown up your skirt by trump.

Trump will get on it. Election year and and he knows Americans are fed up with the illegal immigration. 

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2 minutes ago, DeepBreath said:

Trump will get on it. Election year and and he knows Americans are fed up with the illegal immigration. 

  He won't. 

He and his friends need them for cheap labor and to keep the employment rate he touts so much up.

 Haven't you learned anything yet?

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1 minute ago, Squatchman said:

  He won't. 

He and his friends need them for cheap labor and to keep the employment rate he touts so much up.

 Haven't you learned anything yet?

Without illegals, unemployment would go down and wages would go up...

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Just now, DeepBreath said:

Without illegals, unemployment would go down and wages would go up...

  But trump and his friends don't want to pay higher wages.

 Haven't you learned anything?

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10 minutes ago, Squatchman said:

  But trump and his friends don't want to pay higher wages.

 Haven't you learned anything?

Why would they care as long as their competitors pay roughly the same wages? They would just raise their price of products or goods...

 

You idiots are really business illiterate. 

 

Supply and demand dictate labor value, not corporations or businesses. 

 

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So, the main question is: "Is it safe in Mexico or not? Trump speaks about this country in the different ways ( depends in what way is more convenient for him at this moment ) and I think that his words are not something that we should listen. Personally, when I had a trip in New Zealand I heard a lot of different opinions and every opinion was different. So, I was really confused and I decided to take a look in internet. I understood that I can found great information about this country and rules of behaving and it helps me a lot. I understood that every country is different and when we want to visit an another country, we should be informed and prepared for a lot of occasional evenement.

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On 7/26/2019 at 1:03 AM, drvoke said:

 

 

Image result for DOJ, DHS Issue New 'Third Country' Rule Making US Asylum Nearly Impossible

 

 

 

It is difficult to argue against the logic of this rule. Those truly fleeing persecution seek asylum in the nearest country willing to accept them. But those from Central America are heading through several countries to get to the United States. It could be because we offer the most generous benefits.

 

 

But I am going to hold off judgement until I hear the opposition's objections.
 

 

https://inhomelandsecurity.com/doj-dhs-issue-new-third-country-rule-making-us-asylum-nearly-impossible/

(Full article at above link)

 

 

On July 15, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced that it would be publishing a joint rule with the Department of Justice (DOJ) that would dramatically limit the ability of migrants to seek asylum in the United States. As of July 16, any migrants en route to the United States will be required to seek asylum in a country they are transiting, which is usually Mexico. The only way they can request asylum in the United States is if they can show proof that their asylum request was denied by the third country.

 

Reducing the Burden on the US Immigration System

DHS Acting Secretary Kevin McAleenan stated in a press release, “Until Congress can act, this interim rule will help reduce a major ‘pull factor’ driving irregular migration to the United States and enable DHS and DOJ to more quickly and efficiently process cases originating from the southern border, leading to fewer individuals transiting through Mexico on a dangerous journey.” He also indicated that the rule will reduce the burden on the U.S. immigration system caused by asylum seekers failing to request asylum in the first available country, as well as “economic migrants lacking a legitimate fear of persecution.”

This is not the first time the Trump administration has attempted to severely limit the ability of migrants to request asylum in the United States. In November 2018, the White House attempted to ban people who cross the U.S.-Mexico border between ports of entry from entering the asylum process, limiting asylum requests to official border crossings.

However, U.S. immigration law clearly states that anyone can request asylum from anywhere on U.S. soil. Just three days later, a federal judge from the Northern District of California ruled against the asylum ban and issued a temporary injunction. In late December, the Supreme Court refused to allow the administration to enforce the policy.

 

Migration Protection Protocols

In January, the Trump administration also enacted the Migration Protection Protocols (MPP), under which migrants requesting asylum are sent to Mexico to await their immigration hearings. This wait can take up to a year or more, and many migrants have taken advantage of Mexico’s offer to bus them back to their home countries if they cannot wait that long. Although Mexico was designated as a safe country for the purpose of the MPP, President Trump has contradicted this in statements and speeches, calling Mexico “one of the most dangerous countries in the world.”

Trump and DHS have been trying to reach a formal “safe third country” asylum agreement with Mexico and Guatemala with mixed results. Mexico, which has refused to sign such an agreement in the past, agreed to do so if they could not significantly reduce the number of Central Americans arriving at the U.S. border. Assessments of this would occur in two intervals of 45 days, and the first deadline is on July 25.

Hours before DHS issued the press release, Guatemala’s constitutional court blocked President Morales from immediately declaring Guatemala as a safe third country for asylum seekers. According to Reuters, Morales had been widely expected to sign this agreement at a now-postponed summit with Trump in Washington, DC.

 

Will This New Ban Work?

Given that neither Mexico nor Guatemala have formally signed a “safe third country” agreement with the United States, it is unclear how DHS plans to enforce this new rule. There are three exceptions to the rule, and the most significant one in this case is the denial of asylum applications in transit countries.

Although Mexico has granted asylum to many applicants flooding its border over the last year, it can lawfully refuse these requests as pushback to the United States. If migrants can show that both Guatemala and Mexico denied their asylum claims, which they are more likely to do now since no agreement has been signed, this may not reduce asylum requests at the U.S. border at all.

 

 

We won't have to worry about that for long. 

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52 minutes ago, dontlooknow said:

We won't have to worry about that for long. 

 

Unicorns to the rescue.

 

 

 

kj

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