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merrill

Corporate America Reliable Source of Fraud Regarding Government Svcs and Taxpayer Dollars

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CONFLICT OF INTEREST | Frist’s financial disclosure statement this year placed the value of his blind trusts at between $7 million and $25 million, according to The Washington Post. Frist placed his investments in a blind trust when he joined the Senate to avoid the appearance of conflict of interest. However, contrary to Frist’s initial statements, the blind trust provided him with regular updates on the status of his assets, according to the Associated Press. 

 

INSIDER TRADING INVESTIGATIONS | On Sept. 21, 2005, Jonathan Katz of the Associated Press reported that Frist had instructed a trustee managing his assets to sell all of his HCA stock as well as that of his wife and children. All of their shares of HCA stock were sold by July 8, two weeks before HCA issued a disappointing earnings report leading to a 15 % drop in share price. 

 

Katz also reported that Frist claimed that the order was given to avoid the appearance of conflict of interest over his participation in healthcare legislation, and that he possessed no nonpublic information when the stock was sold (contrary to correspondence between the trustee and Frist family now on file with the Senate). The U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York has issued subpoenas to investigate the sale, and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has also issued a subpoena. 

 

FRIST’S FOCUS ON HEALTHCARE | Before Frist was a household name, and before the HCA Medicare fraud scandal broke, he was active for the Bush-Quayle administration and in Tennessee politics. Frist chaired the Tennessee Medicaid Task Force from 1992-1993, the Republican National Committee’s Health Care Coalition’s National Steering Committee and George H.W. Bush-Dan Quayle ’92, and was deputy director of the Tennessee Bush-Quayle ’92 campaign.

Frist has held the following special assignments according to his “Spotlight on Healthcare” page:

  • Vice Chairman, Alliance for Health Reform (1997-present)
  • Co-Chairman, CSIS Task Force on Strengthening US Leadership on HIV/AIDS (2001-present)
  • Member, The Congressional Heart and Stroke Coalition
  • Member, National Bipartisan Committee on the Future of Medicare (1998-1999)
  • Chairman, Senate Republican Medicare Working Group (August 1995-October 1996)
  • Chairman, Senate Subcommittee on Disability Policy (1996)
 

Frist’s Votes Found to Favor HCA InterestsDec. 4, 2005

| The Associated Press reported: “An analysis of Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist’s voting record shows a pattern of supporting bills that benefit HCA Inc., the Nashville-based hospital company that’s been the foundation of the Frist family’s wealth.” more

 

Investigations Involving Congress Members
Nov. 28, 2005 | The Associated Press reports: “Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, R-Tenn.: The Securities and Exchange Commission and the Justice Department are investigating Frist’s sale of millions of dollars worth of stock in HCA, the Nashville-based hospital chain founded by his father and brother.” more

 

Documents Contradict Comments on Holdings
Oct. 24, 2005 | Jeffrey H. Birnbaum of the Washington Post reports: “Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) was given considerable information about his stake in his family’s hospital company, according to records that are at odds with his past statements that he did not know what was in his stock holdings.” more

 

Frist Sold Stock Before Price Dropped
Sept. 21, 2005 | Jonathan M. Katz reported for the Associated Press: “Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist, a potential presidential candidate in 2008, sold all his stock in his family’s hospital corporation about two weeks before it issued a disappointing earnings report and the price fell nearly 15 percent.” more

Upon Frist’s Senate majority leader nomination:
 

Bad Doctor
Jan. 10, 2003 | Doug Ireland of the LA Weekly reported: “While TV gushed last week over the Republicans new Senate majority leader, Bill Frist, intervening in a traffic accident, portraying the former heart surgeon as a ‘Good Samaritan,’ in truth the GOP has simply replaced a racist with a corporate crook.” more

Regarding HCA and Medicare fraud:
 

NewsHour with Jim Lehrer “Doctoring the Books”
July 31, 1997 | “Three Columbia/HCA executives were charged with defrauding Medicare programs for more than a decade, underscoring the government’s growing investigation into healthcare fraud. After a backgrounder, Margaret Warner will lead a discussion on Columbia/HCA’s defrauding of medicare.” 

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Bill First got himself elected to the US senate during the family's fraud controversy to the point of becoming Republican Senate Chair/President = got away with a slap on the wrist when he should have been in criminal court. 

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Health insurers have forced consumers to pay billions of dollars in medical bills that the insurers themselves should have paid, according to a report released yesterday by the staff of the Senate Commerce Committee.

 

Insurers make paperwork confusing because “they realize that people will just simply give up and not pursue it” if they think they have been shortchanged, Potter said.

 

More on this story:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2009/06/24/AR2009062401636.html

 

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That's why the scope of government should be as small as possible. Power always corrupts and there's nothing more powerful that government.

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7 minutes ago, Michaelf said:

That's why the scope of government should be as small as possible. Power always corrupts and there's nothing more powerful that government.

 

It's not the programs that are corrupt it is the corporations. How would private ownership save you money on health care considering they are the ones doing the over charging?

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Why Medicare-for-All?

Too many people in the U.S. are suffering needlessly or dying because they can’t afford care. Too many people are going bankrupt from high medical bills. The answer: Medicare-for-All. 

 

This system would expand health care coverage to everyone in the U.S., regardless of income. Under a single-payer, Medicare-for-All system, everyone in the U.S. would finally have access to the care they need, without high out-of-pocket costs or insurance companies getting between them and their doctor. 

 

Americans understand that our deeply fragmented health care system doesn’t serve their best interests and puts the health industry first, and that’s why the people power around this issue is growing every day. In 2018, the movement for Medicare-for-All hit several milestones. Most notably, a record number of U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives lawmakers signed on to legislation that would create a single-payer system.

 

These milestones came after years of advocacy by Public Citizen and its allies, culminating in a series of marches, rallies and other actions. 

 

Learn more below. Get involved.

Medicare-for-All would:

Check Out Our Recent Report and Answers to Frequently Asked Questions. 

Listen to Public Citizen’s Recent Medicare-for-All Townhall Featuring Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA).

 

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37 minutes ago, merrill said:

 

It's not the programs that are corrupt it is the corporations. How would private ownership save you money on health care considering they are the ones doing the over charging?

Everything was fine until the government got into the game with Medicare.

 

As to the programs...of course they're corrupt. All we've done is give the most powerful %1 the power of government. The corporate actors you dislike so much are an extension of the all powerful government that we've created...against the warnings of our founders. There is no way to separate them.

 

Why not Medicare for all...because Medicare is what screwed everything up in the first place.

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Micheal is another libertarian idiot. The simpleminded libertarians think that when gov loses power it will  go to the people but that is niave. The fact is when gov loses power that power is competed for and those with wealth and corporations will be in a much better position to GET that power.  Governments are at least somewhat beholden to the people due to elections Corporations are top down power structures that the people have ZERO power to effect changes in

 

Libertarians are simpleminded people who are too selfish to realize that MINE MINE MINE its all mine is NOT a political philosophy it is the ranting of a lunatic child. Ayn Rand once wrote a FAN LETTER to a child killer.  Fawning admiration in the letter about the fact that he didn't accept societies restrictions, in this case about KILLING CHILDREN, and instead fulfilled his own needs and desires. That would be the need and desire to kill children. To Ayn Rand that made him a superman. 

 

Government is  US. WE are the top layer of government. Trump works for ME and YOU. It is place where we can all come together and the least of us can be heard. A place where we can take care of each others needs and help each other through the hard times and share a common prosperity. IF we can drag these MINE MINE ITS ALL MINE children along kicking and screaming to even HAVE a society. Had we taken their philosophy seriously all along we wouldn't HAVE a civilization. We never would have co-operated enough to build the first cities or do the co-operative agriculture to feed those cities. If we EVER listen to the selfish morons it will be a societal suicide pill.

 

Government is like a city where there is a huge central park and it is lush with delicious berries.  The city people planted them built the irrigation to water them the nets so the birds dont eat them all paths to make them accessable and for every five or so baskets of buckets you pick you give one to the city to sell to continue the maintenance of the park and to make jam for those who are disabled and cannot pick their share. Libertarians are the one screaming NO they berries are MINE they are all MINE.

 

The tradgedy of the commons alone shows why the Micheals of the world are simpley selfish simpleminded morons

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4 hours ago, Michaelf said:

Everything was fine until the government got into the game with Medicare.

 

As to the programs...of course they're corrupt. All we've done is give the most powerful %1 the power of government. The corporate actors you dislike so much are an extension of the all powerful government that we've created...against the warnings of our founders. There is no way to separate them.

 

Why not Medicare for all...because Medicare is what screwed everything up in the first place.

 

When you get old you will be up that well known creek without medicare. It's not the programs that are corrupt it is the corporations. How did Medicare screw up everything in the first place?

 

AGAIN How would private ownership save you money on health care considering they are the ones doing the over charging?

 

Those without health insurance face sky-high doctor and hospital bills and ever more aggressive collection tactics—when they receive care at all. Those who are fortunate enough to have insurance experience steep annual premium hikes along with rising deductibles and co-pays, and, all too often, a well-founded fear of losing their coverage should they lose a job or have a serious illness in the family.

 

Still, Americans may well underestimate the degree to which they subsidize the current U.S. health care system out of their own pockets. And almost no one recognizes that even people without health insurance pay substantial sums into the system today.

 

If more people understood the full size of the health care bill that they as individuals are already paying—and for a system that provides seriously inadequate care to millions of Americans—then the corporate opponents of a universal single-payer system might find it far more difficult to frighten the public about the costs of that system.

 

In other words, to recognize the advantages of a single-payer system, we have to understand how the United States funds health care and health research and how much it actually costs us today.

 

Moreover, tax dollars also pay for critical elements of the health care system apart from direct care—Medicare funds much of the expensive equipment hospitals use, for instance, along with all medical residencies.

 

More than one third of the aggregate tax revenues collected in the United States that year went to pay for health care.

 

Recognizing these hidden costs that U.S. households pay for health care today makes it far easier to see how a universal single-payer system—with all of its obvious advantages—can cost most Americans substantially less than the one we have today.

 

Medicare must exist in the fragmented world that is American health care—but no matter how creative the opponents of single-payer get, there is no way they can show convincingly how the administrative costs of a single-payer system could come close to the current level.

 

Administrative costs drop 30% under single payer which is significant.

 

 

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21 minutes ago, merrill said:

 

When you get old you will be up that well known creek without medicare. It's not the programs that are corrupt it is the corporations. How did Medicare screw up everything in the first place?

 

 

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I'm in a hurry so only a little now.

 

Medicare essentially sets a legal minimum for what a provider can charge...for providers who accept medicare. When I was a kid the doctor often came to the house (this was in the city of Chicago). I know it didn't cost much because my parents didn't have much money.

 

When my kids were young our doctor would open the office in the middle of the night to see a sick kid and see the whole family for the cost of an office visit. I didn't have much money but I paid for several week long hospital stays, two kids being born and a hand full of minor surgeries...all without any insurance. Try that today.

 

Medicare isn't the sole cause of course but it started the ball rolling.

 

 

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On 4/14/2019 at 1:46 PM, merrill said:

 

When you get old you will be up that well known creek without medicare. It's not the programs that are corrupt it is the corporations. How did Medicare screw up everything in the first place?

 

AGAIN How would private ownership save you money on health care considering they are the ones doing the over charging?

 

Those without health insurance face sky-high doctor and hospital bills and ever more aggressive collection tactics—when they receive care at all. Those who are fortunate enough to have insurance experience steep annual premium hikes along with rising deductibles and co-pays, and, all too often, a well-founded fear of losing their coverage should they lose a job or have a serious illness in the family.

 

Still, Americans may well underestimate the degree to which they subsidize the current U.S. health care system out of their own pockets. And almost no one recognizes that even people without health insurance pay substantial sums into the system today.

 

If more people understood the full size of the health care bill that they as individuals are already paying—and for a system that provides seriously inadequate care to millions of Americans—then the corporate opponents of a universal single-payer system might find it far more difficult to frighten the public about the costs of that system.

 

In other words, to recognize the advantages of a single-payer system, we have to understand how the United States funds health care and health research and how much it actually costs us today.

 

Moreover, tax dollars also pay for critical elements of the health care system apart from direct care—Medicare funds much of the expensive equipment hospitals use, for instance, along with all medical residencies.

 

More than one third of the aggregate tax revenues collected in the United States that year went to pay for health care.

 

Recognizing these hidden costs that U.S. households pay for health care today makes it far easier to see how a universal single-payer system—with all of its obvious advantages—can cost most Americans substantially less than the one we have today.

 

Medicare must exist in the fragmented world that is American health care—but no matter how creative the opponents of single-payer get, there is no way they can show convincingly how the administrative costs of a single-payer system could come close to the current level.

 

Administrative costs drop 30% under single payer which is significant.

 

 

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IMPROVED MEDICARE FOR ALL WILL BE A DIFFERENT MEDICARE WE KNOW THIS .......

 

MEDICARE FOR ALL WILL PAY THE BILLS WHEREAS MEDICAL INSURANCE OFTEN DOES NOT BECAUSE SO MANY ARE UNDER INSURED NOT NECESSARILY BY CHOICE.

 

Using the medicare template will save tons of money thus a fiscally responsible choice  ......

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