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The test created hundreds of bits of space debris, including dozens that rise higher than the orbit of the International Space Station.

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https://www.nbcnews.com/mach/science/nasa-chief-slams-india-s-terrible-anti-satellite-test-ncna990206?

 

Quote

 

NASA chief slams India's 'terrible' anti-satellite test

 

The test created hundreds of bits of space debris, including dozens that rise higher than the orbit of the International Space Station.

 

According to NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine, India's recent anti-satellite test created 60 pieces of orbital debris big enough to track, 24 of which rise higher than the International Space Station's orbit around Earth.

 

Bridenstine had harsh words to say about India's test April 1 at a NASA town hall meeting, saying that causing this type of risk to humans in space, and low Earth orbit operations, was unacceptable.

 

"That is a terrible, terrible thing, to create an event that sends debris in an apogee that goes above the International Space Station," Bridenstine said at the town hall meeting, which was livestreamed on NASA TV. "And that kind of activity is not compatible with the future of human spaceflight that we need to see happen."

 

"We are charged with commercializing low Earth orbit; we are charged with enabling more activities in space than we've ever seen before for the purpose of benefiting the human condition, whether it's pharmaceuticals or printing human organs in 3D to save lives here on Earth, or manufacturing capabilities in space that you're not able to do in a gravity well," he added. "All of those are placed at risk when these kind of events happen — and when one country does it, then other countries feel like they have to do it as well."

 

Bridenstine said that NASA has identified 400 pieces of orbital debris from the event, including the 60 greater than 10 centimeters in diameter that the agency can track and 24 that travel through the space station's orbital height. As of last week, the agency, along with the Combined Space Operations Center at Vandenberg, had estimated that the risk to the International Space Station of small-debris impact had risen by 44 percent over a period of 10 days.

 

(Bridenstine added later that despite this increased risk, the astronauts are still safe, and that the International Space Station will be maneuvered if needed to avoid the debris — though it's unlikely that will be necessary.)

 

"The good thing is, it's low enough in Earth orbit that over time this will all dissipate," Bridenstine said — whereas much of the debris from a 2007 Chinese anti-satellite test is still in orbit.

 

... snip ...

 

"Debris ends up being there for a long time; if we wreck space, we're not getting it back," he said at the time. "And it's also important to note that creating debris fields intentionally is wrong … the entire world [has to] step up and say, if you're going to do this, you're going to pay a consequence — and right now that consequence is not being paid."

 

 

I agree.  This was very irresponsible of the Indian government.  I worked on a project once that looked at events that might make near earth space unusable for a long time.  It's called the Kessler Syndrome and is very much a concern.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kessler_syndrome .  Although Hollywoodish ... go watch the movie Gravity.  

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how would we stop it ? 

 

 Seems like a few countries would want to try this  

 

 and what Ideas do we have for space junk ? robot satellites that collect debris ?

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4 hours ago, rrober49 said:

and what Ideas do we have for space junk ? robot satellites that collect debris ?

 

Something has to be done to allow relatively safe operations in earth orbit.  Don't know if they'd be practical or not but robot satellites sound like they might be the ideal solution.  Life in pressurized capsules is hazardous enough without the added danger of artificial junk 

 

The movie "Gravity" is unique and illustrates the problem very well.

 

On 4/2/2019 at 8:41 PM, BeAChooser said:

"And that kind of activity is not compatible with the future of human spaceflight that we need to see happen."

 

Exactly.

 

 

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