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How to grow giant beefsteak tomatoes

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I asked my native NC natives the secret about growing tomatoes here. Mine always get blossom end rot.

 

Their advice:1. 

Dig planting hole

add lime and bone meal to bottom

fill hole and plant baby tomato plant. 

after plant starts maturing add some powdered milk on top of plant dirt

add some mircle grow

add some severn dust to keep away buggies.

pick em and eat em

enjoy

 

(I forgot to ask how much lime and bone meal to use. I'll get back about that)

 

Note: this is a secret recipe so don't let it get out.

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Plant the tomato plants UP TO THE LEAF LINE when you first put them in the ground!!!

 

Everywhere along the stalk, roots emerge and the plants grow larger faster.

 

Plus it makes them less susceptible to a bit of dryer weather that might happen.

 

Also wait until AFTER all threats of frost are gone.

 

Trust me, MOST of you SHlTSTAINS have no clue on this or any OTHER crop or farming techniques.

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2 minutes ago, MidnightMax said:

Plant the tomato plants UP TO THE LEAF LINE when you first put them in the ground!!!

 

Everywhere along the stalk, roots emerge and the plants grow larger faster.

 

Plus it makes them less susceptible to a bit of dryer weather that might happen.

 

Also wait until AFTER all threats of frost are gone.

 

Trust me, MOST of you SHlTSTAINS have no clue on this or any OTHER crop or farming techniques.

 

Hey, be nice. 

I don't have to be a sh!tstain on a friendly op like this.

 

Give your hatred a break for a while. Chill.

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Get yerself a freshwater aquarium, say 50 gallon. Put a 2" layer of gravel on the bottom, add h20 + fish.  Get this contraption, it vacuums the gravel. Syphon out 20 gallons of fish shlt water a week into water bucket. replace h20 in aquarium. This fish doo doo  water works wonders for anything that grows.

41pjmUFOLOL.jpg

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Tomato_Amish_Paste.jpg

 

Not a Beefsteak fan (most are hybrid determinants) nor a fan of artificial fertilizers. I did use a table spoon of bone meal in the bottom of the hole and top dressed with manure from the chicken house. 

 

 Amish Paste is my favorite because I canned my tomatoes.  It's an indeterminate variety (non-hybrid) with heavy yields that reproduces to form from saved seeds. I used to use a post hole digger, make a rather deep hole and let it warm up a bit first and plant 'em deep, let em grow out the of the hole,  you can fill it in later.  The hole is also good for late season frosts,  just cover it with a little bit of hay. 

 

Amish paste has whispy leaves, so it needs a little sun protection in the middle of the summer in hotter climates. 

 

Dr. Carolyn Male from upstate New York is THE authority on all things tomato. 

 

 

 

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42 minutes ago, DennisTheMenace said:

Tomato_Amish_Paste.jpg

 

Not a Beefsteak fan (most are hybrid determinants) nor a fan of artificial fertilizers. I did use a table spoon of bone meal in the bottom of the hole and top dressed with manure from the chicken house. 

 

 Amish Paste is my favorite because I canned my tomatoes.  It's an indeterminate variety (non-hybrid) with heavy yields that reproduces to form from saved seeds. I used to use a post hole digger, make a rather deep hole and let it warm up a bit first and plant 'em deep, let em grow out the of the hole,  you can fill it in later.  The hole is also good for late season frosts,  just cover it with a little bit of hay. 

 

Amish paste has whispy leaves, so it needs a little sun protection in the middle of the summer in hotter climates. 

 

Dr. Carolyn Male from upstate New York is THE authority on all things tomato. 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the tips.

 

beef steakers taste good for me. Tomato on toast with heaping mayo drowns my sorrows.

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How to grow giant beefsteak tomatoes

I don't like giant tomatoes.  They taste like water.  I prefer normal size "Better Boy", but the trick is to get them to be both sweet and tart.   The soil needs to be right, and not too much rain/water.

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3 hours ago, fishhead said:

Get yerself a freshwater aquarium, say 50 gallon. Put a 2" layer of gravel on the bottom, add h20 + fish.  Get this contraption, it vacuums the gravel. Syphon out 20 gallons of fish shlt water a week into water bucket. replace h20 in aquarium. This fish doo doo  water works wonders for anything that grows.

41pjmUFOLOL.jpg

 

Wash the 'dick' off it first ... right fishie?

 

 

 

kj

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44 minutes ago, KneeJerk said:

 

Wash the 'dick' off it first ... right fishie?

 

 

 

kj

Told on yourself once again...Laughable!!!

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4 hours ago, fishhead said:

Told on yourself once again...Laughable!!!

Lord, he's filthy.

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8 hours ago, TDS said:

I asked my native NC natives the secret about growing tomatoes here. Mine always get blossom end rot.

 

Their advice:1. 

Dig planting hole

add lime and bone meal to bottom

fill hole and plant baby tomato plant. 

after plant starts maturing add some powdered milk on top of plant dirt

add some mircle grow

add some severn dust to keep away buggies.

pick em and eat em

enjoy

 

(I forgot to ask how much lime and bone meal to use. I'll get back about that)

 

Note: this is a secret recipe so don't let it get out.

 

Lime doesn't do anything.  Use gypsum and if you want to raise the ph then use hydrated lime.  Blossom end rot is lack of calcium which is contained in both gypsum and hydrated lime.  Gypsum is the best growth enhancer, 2nd only to nitrogen.  If you're getting bugs and diseases it means your dirt isn't right and the food is deficient anyway, so no need for chemicals to save crappy food; just go to the store.  Use calcium nitrate instead of miracle grow.  Get it on ebay; it's good stuff.

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8 hours ago, DennisTheMenace said:

Tomato_Amish_Paste.jpg

 

Not a Beefsteak fan (most are hybrid determinants) nor a fan of artificial fertilizers. I did use a table spoon of bone meal in the bottom of the hole and top dressed with manure from the chicken house. 

 

 Amish Paste is my favorite because I canned my tomatoes.  It's an indeterminate variety (non-hybrid) with heavy yields that reproduces to form from saved seeds. I used to use a post hole digger, make a rather deep hole and let it warm up a bit first and plant 'em deep, let em grow out the of the hole,  you can fill it in later.  The hole is also good for late season frosts,  just cover it with a little bit of hay. 

 

Amish paste has whispy leaves, so it needs a little sun protection in the middle of the summer in hotter climates. 

 

Dr. Carolyn Male from upstate New York is THE authority on all things tomato. 

 

 

 

 

Yes amish pastes are really good.  I grow those and brandywines or mortgage lifters (same thing mostly).

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19 minutes ago, Bluenami said:

 

Lime doesn't do anything.  Use gypsum and if you want to raise the ph then use hydrated lime.  Blossom end rot is lack of calcium which is contained in both gypsum and hydrated lime.  Gypsum is the best growth enhancer, 2nd only to nitrogen.  If you're getting bugs and diseases it means your dirt isn't right and the food is deficient anyway, so no need for chemicals to save crappy food; just go to the store.  Use calcium nitrate instead of miracle grow.  Get it on ebay; it's good stuff.

Store bought tomatoes taste like golf balls. golf balls remind me of trump.

 

Thanks for the tips, anyway. Now, I'm totally confused.

Maybe I'll just ask jeeves.

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Carolyn Male is a funny name. 

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2 minutes ago, TDS said:

Store bought tomatoes taste like golf balls. golf balls remind me of trump.

 

lol yeah.  Try the farmers market or corner fruit stand.

 

2 minutes ago, TDS said:

 

Thanks for the tips, anyway. Now, I'm totally confused.

Maybe I'll just ask jeeves.

 

What are you confused about?  Gypsum CaSO4 and it's just drywall.  Crush some drywall in the hole and mix it with the dirt.  The two most leached elements are calcium and sulfur, so places that get more than 20-30 inches of rain are places lacking calcium and sulfur.

 

Lime (CaCO3) really doesn't do anything as it needs an acid to break it apart.  It's really fine driveway gravel (limestone).  It's good for grass which is why grass loves driveways, but you'll never get enough of it in a hole to break down to atoms in the quantity required to make any difference.  I've seen studies comparing the ph of limed fields over the course of 10 years with no meaningful rise in ph.  If it works at all, it takes forever.

 

Now hydrated lime is powerful stuff.  Ca(OH)2

 

Hydrated-Lime-2lb-33362-L-510x813.png

 

Bone meal also requires an acid to break it apart.  It's CaPO4 and it's tough to separate just like lime.  Same thing with seashells.  Those things seem like a waste of time to me, especially if you have a neutral soil (6.5 - 7ph) which is what tomatoes like.

 

The best bang for the buck will be compost and drywall scraps from a job site.  If the ph is too low, use the hydrated lime.  It works instantly and is really powerful.

 

Try one hole with hydrated lime, one hole with gypsum, and one control then see which performs best.

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8 hours ago, DennisTheMenace said:

Tomato_Amish_Paste.jpg

 

Not a Beefsteak fan (most are hybrid determinants) nor a fan of artificial fertilizers. I did use a table spoon of bone meal in the bottom of the hole and top dressed with manure from the chicken house. 

 

 Amish Paste is my favorite because I canned my tomatoes.  It's an indeterminate variety (non-hybrid) with heavy yields that reproduces to form from saved seeds. I used to use a post hole digger, make a rather deep hole and let it warm up a bit first and plant 'em deep, let em grow out the of the hole,  you can fill it in later.  The hole is also good for late season frosts,  just cover it with a little bit of hay. 

 

Amish paste has whispy leaves, so it needs a little sun protection in the middle of the summer in hotter climates. 

 

Dr. Carolyn Male from upstate New York is THE authority on all things tomato. 

 

 

 

I never got much fruit from Amish paste but they are excellent.

i grownjet star tomatoes and my plants get 6 feet tall.

chicken manure goes in the hole and then i fertilize with ammonia and epsom salt

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27 minutes ago, Bluenami said:

 

lol yeah.  Try the farmers market or corner fruit stand.

 

 

What are you confused about?  Gypsum CaSO4 and it's just drywall.  Crush some drywall in the hole and mix it with the dirt.  The two most leached elements are calcium and sulfur, so places that get more than 20-30 inches of rain are places lacking calcium and sulfur.

 

Lime (CaCO3) really doesn't do anything as it needs an acid to break it apart.  It's really fine driveway gravel (limestone).  It's good for grass which is why grass loves driveways, but you'll never get enough of it in a hole to break down to atoms in the quantity required to make any difference.  I've seen studies comparing the ph of limed fields over the course of 10 years with no meaningful rise in ph.  If it works at all, it takes forever.

 

Now hydrated lime is powerful stuff.  Ca(OH)2

 

Hydrated-Lime-2lb-33362-L-510x813.png

 

Bone meal also requires an acid to break it apart.  It's CaPO4 and it's tough to separate just like lime.  Same thing with seashells.  Those things seem like a waste of time to me, especially if you have a neutral soil (6.5 - 7ph) which is what tomatoes like.

 

The best bang for the buck will be compost and drywall scraps from a job site.  If the ph is too low, use the hydrated lime.  It works instantly and is really powerful.

 

Try one hole with hydrated lime, one hole with gypsum, and one control then see which performs best.

 

Does chinese drywall work?👹

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6 minutes ago, TDS said:

 

Does chinese drywall work?👹

 

Probably but sounds expensive to go all the way to china for drywall.

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How Dare you grow your own Tomatoes!!! If people grew their own produce what will all the Illegals you guys let into the country do?? Will you hire them to pick your veggies?

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11 hours ago, TDS said:

I asked my native NC natives the secret about growing tomatoes here. Mine always get blossom end rot.

 

Their advice:1. 

Dig planting hole

add lime and bone meal to bottom

fill hole and plant baby tomato plant. 

after plant starts maturing add some powdered milk on top of plant dirt

add some mircle grow

add some severn dust to keep away buggies.

pick em and eat em

enjoy

 

(I forgot to ask how much lime and bone meal to use. I'll get back about that)

 

Note: this is a secret recipe so don't let it get out.

do you have any idea what blossom end rot is caused by?

get some tomato tone and call it a day....keep the seven off and the miracle grow..that sh it is poison....

TOMATO TONE....

lack of calcium is the cause of blossom end rot...or improper watering practices.....

 

Image result for tomato tone

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11 hours ago, harryramar said:

I never got much fruit from Amish paste but they are excellent.

i grownjet star tomatoes and my plants get 6 feet tall.

chicken manure goes in the hole and then i fertilize with ammonia and epsom salt

 

 

When I first retired from the Navy, I went home to the family farm to look after my elderly parents. I was basically living in a Fifth-Wheel trailer in their back yard. 

 

My dad had 1948 Ford 8N with a two bottom plow. I bought a used Ariens Rocket rear tine tiller,  put a new 8HP Tecumseh engine on it...and went to work. 

 

48120546_614.jpg

 

I needed something to do to keep busy.  I had a huge "garden" 2+ acres.  

 

For couple of years I had over 250 tomato plants of different varieties, a bout 10 plants each to try and narrow down what performed best in my locale.  

 

Different locales get different results.   I was in zone 7, just north of OKC.  Amish Paste performed well for me, as well as Orange Oxheart and Black from Tula.

 

Black from Tula has VERY heavy foliage, no worries about sun scald.  They almost look like a cedar tree.

 

 Very vigorous plants and good yields.  The only problem was the quality of fruit...not what I'd expect from an Heirloom variety.

 

For me,  Amish Paste was the best performer.  Granted, I was only growing "heirlooms" no hybrids. 

 

As an aside, if you are a fan of muskmelons (incorrectly called cantaloupe by most folks) check out Old Time Tennessee.

 

They are nearly the size of a watermelon and are the sweetest muskmelon I've ever experienced. They will make you take on religion and start speaking in tongues. 

 

They are quite delicate, split easily,  and are not suitable for shipping. 

 

melon-old-time-tn_MED.jpg

 

 

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3 minutes ago, DennisTheMenace said:

 

 

When I first retired from the Navy, I went home to the family farm to look after my elderly parents. I was basically living in a Fifth-Wheel trailer in their back yard. 

 

My dad had 1948 Ford 8N with a two bottom plow. I bought a used Ariens Rocket rear tine tiller,  put a new 8HP Tecumseh engine on it...and went to work. 

 

48120546_614.jpg

 

I needed something to do to keep busy.  I had a huge "garden" 2+ acres.  

 

For couple of years I had over 250 tomato plants of different varieties, a bout 10 plants each to try and narrow down what performed best in my locale.  

 

Different locales get different results.   I was in zone 7, just north of OKC.  Amish Paste performed well for me, as well as Orange Oxheart and Black from Tula.

 

Black from Tula has VERY heavy foliage, no worries about sun scald.  They almost look like a cedar tree.

 

 Very vigorous plants and good yields.  The only problem was the quality of fruit...not what I'd expect from an Heirloom variety.

 

For me,  Amish Paste was the best performer.  Granted, I was only growing "heirlooms" no hybrids. 

 

As an aside, if you are a fan of muskmelons (incorrectly called cantaloupe by most folks) check out Old Time Tennessee.

 

They are nearly the size of a watermelon and are the sweetest muskmelon I've ever experienced. They will make you take on religion and start speaking in tongues. 

 

They are quite delicate, split easily,  and are not suitable for shipping. 

 

melon-old-time-tn_MED.jpg

 

 

 

But they do look like fit for sh!tting.

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11 hours ago, Hankk said:

How Dare you grow your own Tomatoes!!! If people grew their own produce what will all the Illegals you guys let into the country do?? Will you hire them to pick your veggies?

 

I would sharecrop with them.🤓

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12 hours ago, Bluenami said:

 

Probably but sounds expensive to go all the way to china for drywall.

 

google chinese drywall lawsuit.

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