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7 minutes ago, RollingRock said:

That's better than a handful of billionaires purchasing 200-foot yachts and/or 40-room homes the Hamptons....

If they earned it they can do whatever they want with their $$$

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5 hours ago, DennisTheMenace said:

still-feeling-the-bern-2020-unisex-anvil

 

Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont and the runner-up in the 2016 Democratic primary, has officially launched his 2020 presidential campaign.

 

“I am writing to let you know I have decided to run for president of the United States,” announced Sanders in an email to supporters Tuesday morning. “I am asking you to join me today as part of an unprecedented and historic grassroots campaign that will begin with at least a million people from across the country.”

 

In the statement, Sanders says that the campaign is not just about winning the nomination and presidency but “is about transforming our country and creating a government based on the principles of economic, social, racial and environmental justice. “ He also refers to president Trump as “a pathological liar, a fraud, a racist, a sexist, a xenophobe and someone who is undermining American democracy,”

 

The 77-year-old senator gave Hillary Clinton an unexpected fight in the 2016 Democratic primary, winning 43 percent of the primary vote and over 20 contests. This announcement is coming earlier in the cycle than last time, when he declared on April 30, 2015.

 

Sanders faces a far different landscape than he did in 2016 when there were only a few other plausible candidates, most of whom dropped out of the race early, leaving him in a one-on-one contest with Clinton. Voters now have over a dozen options, many of whom who have adopted language and policies similar to Sanders’s 2016 platform, which featured a focus on income inequality and a “Medicare-for-all” program. There are also still open wounds for some Clinton supporters who hold Sanders responsible for her loss to Trump. Sanders has admitted that his age is a potential concern, as he would be 79 on Election Day 2020, the oldest ever by nine years.

 

But Sanders’s 2016 run also allows him a huge fundraising advantage in a splintered Democratic primary where many of the candidates have sworn off direct corporate donations. A New York Times analysis from earlier this month estimated that his list of 2.1 million online donors roughly equaled the total of every other Democratic hopeful combined. Former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas was second at 743,000, the only other candidate with over 350,000 donors. The Times analysis also found that Sanders donors were the most exclusive, with 87 percent giving only to him. In the 2016 cycle, Sanders raised $134 million in donations of $200 or less.

 

Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont and the runner-up in the 2016 Democratic primary, has officially launched his 2020 presidential campaign.

“I am writing to let you know I have decided to run for president of the United States,” announced Sanders in an email to supporters Tuesday morning. “I am asking you to join me today as part of an unprecedented and historic grassroots campaign that will begin with at least a million people from across the country.”

In the statement, Sanders says that the campaign is not just about winning the nomination and presidency but “is about transforming our country and creating a government based on the principles of economic, social, racial and environmental justice. “ He also refers to president Trump as “a pathological liar, a fraud, a racist, a sexist, a xenophobe and someone who is undermining American democracy,”

The 77-year-old senator gave Hillary Clinton an unexpected fight in the 2016 Democratic primary, winning 43 percent of the primary vote and over 20 contests. This announcement is coming earlier in the cycle than last time, when he declared on April 30, 2015.

Sanders faces a far different landscape than he did in 2016 when there were only a few other plausible candidates, most of whom dropped out of the race early, leaving him in a one-on-one contest with Clinton. Voters now have over a dozen options, many of whom who have adopted language and policies similar to Sanders’s 2016 platform, which featured a focus on income inequality and a “Medicare-for-all” program. There are also still open wounds for some Clinton supporters who hold Sanders responsible for her loss to Trump. Sanders has admitted that his age is a potential concern, as he would be 79 on Election Day 2020, the oldest ever by nine years.

But Sanders’s 2016 run also allows him a huge fundraising advantage in a splintered Democratic primary where many of the candidates have sworn off direct corporate donations. A New York Times analysis from earlier this month estimated that his list of 2.1 million online donors roughly equaled the total of every other Democratic hopeful combined. Former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas was second at 743,000, the only other candidate with over 350,000 donors. The Times analysis also found that Sanders donors were the most exclusive, with 87 percent giving only to him. In the 2016 cycle, Sanders raised $134 million in donations of $200 or less.

 

Last month a source with direct knowledge of Sanders’s plans told Yahoo News he was emboldened by early polls of the race that have consistently shown him as one of the top candidates in a crowded Democratic primary field. In particular, the source said Sanders was heartened to see numbers indicating he was one of the leading candidates among African-American and Latino voters, two groups he was perceived as struggling with in 2016.

 

At this early stage, however, Sanders, along with former Vice President Joe Biden, who has not announced a run of his own, are likely benefiting from a name recognition advantage over lesser-known candidates.

 

In his announcement, Sanders framed his 2020 campaign as a completion of his 2016 run.

 

“Three years ago, during our 2016 campaign, when we brought forth our progressive agenda we were told that our ideas were ‘radical’ and ‘extreme,’” wrote Sanders. “We were told that Medicare for All, a $15 an hour minimum wage, free tuition at public colleges and universities, aggressively combating climate change, demanding that the wealthy start paying their fair share of taxes, were all concepts that the American people would never accept.”

 

“Well, three years have come and gone. And, as result of millions of Americans standing up and fighting back, all of these policies and more are now supported by a majority of Americans. Together, you and I and our 2016 campaign began the political revolution. Now, it is time to complete that revolution and implement the vision that we fought for.”

 

 

 

100+

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1 hour ago, Z09 said:

If they earned it they can do whatever they want with their $$$

Or our representative government can levy taxes and spend the dollars on social programs and services within the bounds of the Constitution.  

 

You don't have  problem with America, do you?

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1 hour ago, Z09 said:

If they earned it they can do whatever they want with their $$$

Except most didn't earn it.  Their employees earned it and they (the CEO's) took 99% of the profits for themselves.  Things need to be more proportionate.  How about a 50 ft yacht for the CEO and a 20% pay increase for his workers?  

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17 minutes ago, RollingRock said:

Except most didn't earn it.  Their employees earned it and they (the CEO's) took 99% of the profits for themselves.  Things need to be more proportionate.  How about a 50 ft yacht for the CEO and a 20% pay increase for his workers?  

No...

The owners own the company and it's their profits....Or their loses

 

You want wealth distribution....

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7 hours ago, DennisTheMenace said:

still-feeling-the-bern-2020-unisex-anvil

 

Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont and the runner-up in the 2016 Democratic primary, has officially launched his 2020 presidential campaign.

 

 

It was one thing to run in 2016 when the only real opposition was Hillary Clinton. It will be interesting to see if he can recapture his 2016 momentum in the crowded 2020 primaries.

 

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4 hours ago, neue regel said:

The field will further be pushed leftward. This is getting interesting. 

 

Very true. I think Bernie's 2016 success pushed the field leftward already. Some of his more progressive ideas are being floated in the marketplace of ideas. Single-payer and free community college, in particular, need to be examined and accepted/rejected on the merits. 

 

 

 

 

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27 minutes ago, RollingRock said:

Except most didn't earn it.  Their employees earned it and they (the CEO's) took 99% of the profits for themselves.  Things need to be more proportionate.  How about a 50 ft yacht for the CEO and a 20% pay increase for his workers?  

That's just wrong...

If a man builds up a company with hard work and investment and sacrifice he didn't earn it...?

His employees did?

 

I've never heard anything so removed from common sense...

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7 hours ago, DennisTheMenace said:

still-feeling-the-bern-2020-unisex-anvil

 

Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont and the runner-up in the 2016 Democratic primary, has officially launched his 2020 presidential campaign.

 

“I am writing to let you know I have decided to run for president of the United States,” announced Sanders in an email to supporters Tuesday morning. “I am asking you to join me today as part of an unprecedented and historic grassroots campaign that will begin with at least a million people from across the country.”

 

In the statement, Sanders says that the campaign is not just about winning the nomination and presidency but “is about transforming our country and creating a government based on the principles of economic, social, racial and environmental justice. “ He also refers to president Trump as “a pathological liar, a fraud, a racist, a sexist, a xenophobe and someone who is undermining American democracy,”

 

The 77-year-old senator gave Hillary Clinton an unexpected fight in the 2016 Democratic primary, winning 43 percent of the primary vote and over 20 contests. This announcement is coming earlier in the cycle than last time, when he declared on April 30, 2015.

 

Sanders faces a far different landscape than he did in 2016 when there were only a few other plausible candidates, most of whom dropped out of the race early, leaving him in a one-on-one contest with Clinton. Voters now have over a dozen options, many of whom who have adopted language and policies similar to Sanders’s 2016 platform, which featured a focus on income inequality and a “Medicare-for-all” program. There are also still open wounds for some Clinton supporters who hold Sanders responsible for her loss to Trump. Sanders has admitted that his age is a potential concern, as he would be 79 on Election Day 2020, the oldest ever by nine years.

 

But Sanders’s 2016 run also allows him a huge fundraising advantage in a splintered Democratic primary where many of the candidates have sworn off direct corporate donations. A New York Times analysis from earlier this month estimated that his list of 2.1 million online donors roughly equaled the total of every other Democratic hopeful combined. Former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas was second at 743,000, the only other candidate with over 350,000 donors. The Times analysis also found that Sanders donors were the most exclusive, with 87 percent giving only to him. In the 2016 cycle, Sanders raised $134 million in donations of $200 or less.

 

Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont and the runner-up in the 2016 Democratic primary, has officially launched his 2020 presidential campaign.

“I am writing to let you know I have decided to run for president of the United States,” announced Sanders in an email to supporters Tuesday morning. “I am asking you to join me today as part of an unprecedented and historic grassroots campaign that will begin with at least a million people from across the country.”

In the statement, Sanders says that the campaign is not just about winning the nomination and presidency but “is about transforming our country and creating a government based on the principles of economic, social, racial and environmental justice. “ He also refers to president Trump as “a pathological liar, a fraud, a racist, a sexist, a xenophobe and someone who is undermining American democracy,”

The 77-year-old senator gave Hillary Clinton an unexpected fight in the 2016 Democratic primary, winning 43 percent of the primary vote and over 20 contests. This announcement is coming earlier in the cycle than last time, when he declared on April 30, 2015.

Sanders faces a far different landscape than he did in 2016 when there were only a few other plausible candidates, most of whom dropped out of the race early, leaving him in a one-on-one contest with Clinton. Voters now have over a dozen options, many of whom who have adopted language and policies similar to Sanders’s 2016 platform, which featured a focus on income inequality and a “Medicare-for-all” program. There are also still open wounds for some Clinton supporters who hold Sanders responsible for her loss to Trump. Sanders has admitted that his age is a potential concern, as he would be 79 on Election Day 2020, the oldest ever by nine years.

But Sanders’s 2016 run also allows him a huge fundraising advantage in a splintered Democratic primary where many of the candidates have sworn off direct corporate donations. A New York Times analysis from earlier this month estimated that his list of 2.1 million online donors roughly equaled the total of every other Democratic hopeful combined. Former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas was second at 743,000, the only other candidate with over 350,000 donors. The Times analysis also found that Sanders donors were the most exclusive, with 87 percent giving only to him. In the 2016 cycle, Sanders raised $134 million in donations of $200 or less.

 

Last month a source with direct knowledge of Sanders’s plans told Yahoo News he was emboldened by early polls of the race that have consistently shown him as one of the top candidates in a crowded Democratic primary field. In particular, the source said Sanders was heartened to see numbers indicating he was one of the leading candidates among African-American and Latino voters, two groups he was perceived as struggling with in 2016.

 

At this early stage, however, Sanders, along with former Vice President Joe Biden, who has not announced a run of his own, are likely benefiting from a name recognition advantage over lesser-known candidates.

 

In his announcement, Sanders framed his 2020 campaign as a completion of his 2016 run.

 

“Three years ago, during our 2016 campaign, when we brought forth our progressive agenda we were told that our ideas were ‘radical’ and ‘extreme,’” wrote Sanders. “We were told that Medicare for All, a $15 an hour minimum wage, free tuition at public colleges and universities, aggressively combating climate change, demanding that the wealthy start paying their fair share of taxes, were all concepts that the American people would never accept.”

 

“Well, three years have come and gone. And, as result of millions of Americans standing up and fighting back, all of these policies and more are now supported by a majority of Americans. Together, you and I and our 2016 campaign began the political revolution. Now, it is time to complete that revolution and implement the vision that we fought for.”

 

 

 

actually I feel the heat of his ideology burning out as a social alternative directing social realities around the globe.

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51 minutes ago, Olivaw said:

 

It was one thing to run in 2016 when the only real opposition was Hillary Clinton. It will be interesting to see if he can recapture his 2016 momentum in the crowded 2020 primaries.

 

He'll be running against people who don't take PAC money, who are also running on cleaning up the economic system so the rich stop ripping everybody off to the great detriment of everybody including-- eventually --the rich themselves, of course.  Anyway, it'll be nice to see political discourse for a little while about the details of policy differences, rather than "Yer wife's ugly and yer crooked!"  "Yeah, well yer a pathological liar!"

 

We really need to move on from all of that, no matter how much some of the trolls here try to keep us angry.

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1 hour ago, Z09 said:

That's just wrong...

If a man builds up a company with hard work and investment and sacrifice he didn't earn it...?

His employees did?

 

I've never heard anything so removed from common sense...

So if all his employees left and the CEO was the one to take the calls, process the payments, send out the checks, process the payments, fix the issues, etc., etc., etc then of course he should take all the money.

 

But he didn't do all those things, did he?   I'm not asking for employees to make as much as the CEO - I'm simply asking for companies who do well to give larges raises AS WELL AS outstanding executive compensation.  Spread the wealth - there is plenty to go around. 

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3 minutes ago, RollingRock said:

So if all his employees left and the CEO was the one to take the calls, process the payments, send out the checks, process the payments, fix the issues, etc., etc., etc then of course he should take all the money.

 

But he didn't do all those things, did he?   

No

He pays people to do that.

And that's the way it works.

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Just now, Z09 said:

No

He pays people to do that.

And that's the way it works.

Well, that's going to change.  :)  Either he pays his people well or they will leave.  Retraining employees every 3-4 months gets pricey.  

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Just now, splunch said:

He'll be running against people who don't take PAC money, who are also running on cleaning up the economic system so the rich stop ripping everybody off to the great detriment of everybody including-- eventually --the rich themselves, of course.  Anyway, it'll be nice to see political discourse for a little while about the details of policy differences, rather than "Yer wife's ugly and yer crooked!"  "Yeah, well yer a pathological liar!"

 

We really need to move on from all of that, no matter how much some of the trolls here try to keep us angry.

 

Absolutely Splunch. Voters are already desperate for an alternative to Trump's corruption and gutter politics. A constructive debate about the best ideas and the candidate who can best present those ideas is exactly what is needed. 

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2 minutes ago, RollingRock said:

Well, that's going to change.  :)  Either he pays his people well or they will leave.  Retraining employees every 3-4 months gets pricey.  

Any employee can leave any job if they're  not happy

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5 minutes ago, Z09 said:

Any employee can leave any job if they're  not happy

Very oligarchy-ish of you.  :wacko:  So you prefer to have a country with a few rich guys and everyone else floundering in abject poverty? 

 

That's not what most Americans want.  

 

The candidate who can address the needs of the working class WILL be our president in 2020.  Corporate oligarchy is not the route most Americans want to take (only the route those in power want to take).

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6 minutes ago, RollingRock said:

Well, that's going to change.  :)  Either he pays his people well or they will leave.  Retraining employees every 3-4 months gets pricey.  

That's one of the long goals.  To fix that, we have to move some of the power back into the hands of the employees.  You know what would be enormously powerful in that regard?  National healthcare.  How many people do you personally know who would very seriously consider changing jobs if they knew their healthcare wouldn't kill them in the process?  People are slaves to their bennies, and we're stuck in a race to the bottom.  If people could leave their jobs without fear of going bankrupt over a medical event, they would have a lot more economic freedom.

 

The other fix is just as big:  dealing with monopolies, cartels, too-big-to-fail.  if there is one employer employing half the people in town, that's not going to be a good environment for workers to assert themselves.

 

Making it easier for people to unionize without fear might be a really good start, too.  That would put the ball directly into the employees' hands so they can start pushing back.  The day that large corporations are obliged to provide decent health benefits for employees is the day they start to push back against insurers and hospital groups and tort law, and start working WITH their employees to drive down costs, instead of just passing them all off to the employees, "Sorry!  Price went up again this year.  You make $2,000 per year less than you did last year.  See ya!"

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21 minutes ago, RollingRock said:

So if all his employees left and the CEO was the one to take the calls, process the payments, send out the checks, process the payments, fix the issues, etc., etc., etc then of course he should take all the money.

 

But he didn't do all those things, did he?   I'm not asking for employees to make as much as the CEO - I'm simply asking for companies who do well to give larges raises AS WELL AS outstanding executive compensation.  Spread the wealth - there is plenty to go around. 

 

On the surface, it sounds like you have more of a need with board of directors and public companies than CEOs. We can’t believe that a corporation is going to give a raise to labor that will increase the wage to above market value when that money if first promised to investors which will ultimately drive up the stock price.

 

The world may be a better place the other way but it’s not really reality. 

 

 

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13 minutes ago, RollingRock said:

Very oligarchy-ish of you.  :wacko:  So you prefer to have a country with a few rich guys and everyone else floundering in abject poverty? 

 

That's not what most Americans want.  

 

The candidate who can address the needs of the working class WILL be our president in 2020.  Corporate oligarchy is not the route most Americans want to take (only the route those in power want to take).

Most Americans do not want what you portray...

 

Most of the country doesn't live in abject poverty...

And taking from one to lift up another never works

 

Remember how your Bernie Sanders praised Venezuela?

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9 minutes ago, neue regel said:

On the surface, it sounds like you have more of a need with board of directors and public companies than CEOs. We can’t believe that a corporation is going to give a raise to labor that will increase the wage to above market value when that money if first promised to investors which will ultimately drive up the stock price.

 

The world may be a better place the other way but it’s not really reality. 

We have the power to MAKE it reality, neue regel.  But we need to demand it.  We need to put representatives in power that DEMAND increased worker pay, increased benefits, etc.  Corporations should answer to the people, not the other way around.  

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Feel the Burn. This time the Burn is going to show AOC what a real workers paradise can be. Sanders is a genuine commie not a stupid pretender like AOC. I hope dems empty their moth eaten pockets for his campaign. Is it possible that the DNC will torpedo his campaign again? After his last loss Sanders supporters left the convention, joined with BLM, and had a riot in the streets. Hopefully he will get the nomination and take Spartacus along for a trouncing by Trump.

 

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6 minutes ago, johndnorth said:

Feel the Burn. This time the Burn is going to show AOC what a real workers paradise can be. Sanders is a genuine commie not a stupid pretender like AOC. I hope dems empty their moth eaten pockets for his campaign.

My pockets aren't "moth eaten."  I have several thousand tucked aside to donate to Bernie and his campaign.

 

6 minutes ago, johndnorth said:

Is it possible that the DNC will torpedo his campaign again?

Possibly but I hope not.

 

6 minutes ago, johndnorth said:

 After his last loss Sanders supporters left the convention, joined with BLM, and had a riot in the streets.

That is incorrect.  There was no "riot."  Please turn off Faux News and reacquaint yourself with reality.

 

6 minutes ago, johndnorth said:

Hopefully he will get the nomination and take Spartacus along for a trouncing by Trump.

Trump might be under indictment at that point (or, with any luck, may have fled to Russia).  If he is still there, he's not going to be re-elected.  

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45 minutes ago, RollingRock said:

Very oligarchy-ish of you.  :wacko:  So you prefer to have a country with a few rich guys and everyone else floundering in abject poverty? 

 

That's not what most Americans want.  

 

The candidate who can address the needs of the working class WILL be our president in 2020.  Corporate oligarchy is not the route most Americans want to take (only the route those in power want to take).

The Democrat Party has long since written off working class blue collar workers. They are now a coalition of the perpetually aggrieved, identity politics, gender drama, LGBTqrstuv advancement. They are not interested in helping white male cisgendered middle-income earners.

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5 minutes ago, RollingRock said:

We have the power to MAKE it reality, neue regel.  But we need to demand it.  We need to put representatives in power that DEMAND increased worker pay, increased benefits, etc.  Corporations should answer to the people, not the other way around.  

 

In my opinion, legislating better pay, while well meaning, won’t work. I believe we tried that with CEO pay. Compensation was instead given en with stock options, exacerbating the problem. 

 

Because we’re a nation addicted to cheap products, the idea that we’ll ever manufacture anything again...ie: textiles, electronics, furniture....is pretty much gone. The loss of blue collar jobs has left a void. 

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9 hours ago, DennisTheMenace said:

still-feeling-the-bern-2020-unisex-anvil

 

Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont and the runner-up in the 2016 Democratic primary, has officially launched his 2020 presidential campaign.

 

“I am writing to let you know I have decided to run for president of the United States,” announced Sanders in an email to supporters Tuesday morning. “I am asking you to join me today as part of an unprecedented and historic grassroots campaign that will begin with at least a million people from across the country.”

 

In the statement, Sanders says that the campaign is not just about winning the nomination and presidency but “is about transforming our country and creating a government based on the principles of economic, social, racial and environmental justice. “ He also refers to president Trump as “a pathological liar, a fraud, a racist, a sexist, a xenophobe and someone who is undermining American democracy,”

 

The 77-year-old senator gave Hillary Clinton an unexpected fight in the 2016 Democratic primary, winning 43 percent of the primary vote and over 20 contests. This announcement is coming earlier in the cycle than last time, when he declared on April 30, 2015.

 

Sanders faces a far different landscape than he did in 2016 when there were only a few other plausible candidates, most of whom dropped out of the race early, leaving him in a one-on-one contest with Clinton. Voters now have over a dozen options, many of whom who have adopted language and policies similar to Sanders’s 2016 platform, which featured a focus on income inequality and a “Medicare-for-all” program. There are also still open wounds for some Clinton supporters who hold Sanders responsible for her loss to Trump. Sanders has admitted that his age is a potential concern, as he would be 79 on Election Day 2020, the oldest ever by nine years.

 

But Sanders’s 2016 run also allows him a huge fundraising advantage in a splintered Democratic primary where many of the candidates have sworn off direct corporate donations. A New York Times analysis from earlier this month estimated that his list of 2.1 million online donors roughly equaled the total of every other Democratic hopeful combined. Former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas was second at 743,000, the only other candidate with over 350,000 donors. The Times analysis also found that Sanders donors were the most exclusive, with 87 percent giving only to him. In the 2016 cycle, Sanders raised $134 million in donations of $200 or less.

 

Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont and the runner-up in the 2016 Democratic primary, has officially launched his 2020 presidential campaign.

“I am writing to let you know I have decided to run for president of the United States,” announced Sanders in an email to supporters Tuesday morning. “I am asking you to join me today as part of an unprecedented and historic grassroots campaign that will begin with at least a million people from across the country.”

In the statement, Sanders says that the campaign is not just about winning the nomination and presidency but “is about transforming our country and creating a government based on the principles of economic, social, racial and environmental justice. “ He also refers to president Trump as “a pathological liar, a fraud, a racist, a sexist, a xenophobe and someone who is undermining American democracy,”

The 77-year-old senator gave Hillary Clinton an unexpected fight in the 2016 Democratic primary, winning 43 percent of the primary vote and over 20 contests. This announcement is coming earlier in the cycle than last time, when he declared on April 30, 2015.

Sanders faces a far different landscape than he did in 2016 when there were only a few other plausible candidates, most of whom dropped out of the race early, leaving him in a one-on-one contest with Clinton. Voters now have over a dozen options, many of whom who have adopted language and policies similar to Sanders’s 2016 platform, which featured a focus on income inequality and a “Medicare-for-all” program. There are also still open wounds for some Clinton supporters who hold Sanders responsible for her loss to Trump. Sanders has admitted that his age is a potential concern, as he would be 79 on Election Day 2020, the oldest ever by nine years.

But Sanders’s 2016 run also allows him a huge fundraising advantage in a splintered Democratic primary where many of the candidates have sworn off direct corporate donations. A New York Times analysis from earlier this month estimated that his list of 2.1 million online donors roughly equaled the total of every other Democratic hopeful combined. Former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas was second at 743,000, the only other candidate with over 350,000 donors. The Times analysis also found that Sanders donors were the most exclusive, with 87 percent giving only to him. In the 2016 cycle, Sanders raised $134 million in donations of $200 or less.

 

Last month a source with direct knowledge of Sanders’s plans told Yahoo News he was emboldened by early polls of the race that have consistently shown him as one of the top candidates in a crowded Democratic primary field. In particular, the source said Sanders was heartened to see numbers indicating he was one of the leading candidates among African-American and Latino voters, two groups he was perceived as struggling with in 2016.

 

At this early stage, however, Sanders, along with former Vice President Joe Biden, who has not announced a run of his own, are likely benefiting from a name recognition advantage over lesser-known candidates.

 

In his announcement, Sanders framed his 2020 campaign as a completion of his 2016 run.

 

“Three years ago, during our 2016 campaign, when we brought forth our progressive agenda we were told that our ideas were ‘radical’ and ‘extreme,’” wrote Sanders. “We were told that Medicare for All, a $15 an hour minimum wage, free tuition at public colleges and universities, aggressively combating climate change, demanding that the wealthy start paying their fair share of taxes, were all concepts that the American people would never accept.”

 

“Well, three years have come and gone. And, as result of millions of Americans standing up and fighting back, all of these policies and more are now supported by a majority of Americans. Together, you and I and our 2016 campaign began the political revolution. Now, it is time to complete that revolution and implement the vision that we fought for.”

 

 

 

I am pleased he is running too. He may have lost to Hillary but his message lived on..big time. All of those running right now have picked up his passions for a better America. :)

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