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I bottled a batch today. It's a (pseudo) Scotch ale. I sat "pseudo" because this ain't Scotland and I ain't MacLaripu. Its called "Wee Drappie".

 

Bludog was interested in my lift table (in another thread). Here it is. I moved the batch from the fridge in the other room on its wheels, raised it to almost the height of the island, then moved it over about a foot by hand. It's all safely in bottles now.

 

Moving the carboy on wheels.

 

Lift table brings to almost the height of the island.

 

Safe and sound on the island. :)

 

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Really nice the way that lift table works.  What the purpose of the shim, tilting the carboy in the last pic?

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13 hours ago, bludog said:

Really nice the way that lift table works.  What the purpose of the shim, tilting the carboy in the last pic?

 

Prior to bottling, you siphon the beer off the yeast sediment on the bottom. You can see the little later of sediment on the bottom of the carboy. The siphon rod has a small foot, to keep the opening above the beer. Tilting the carboy allows a bit more beer to get siphoned off. Almost none is wasted. There's still a small amount of yeast in suspension for natural carbonation. See below. 

 

It's siphoned into a plastic bottling bucket, the only time there's significant contact with plastic, but only for an hour or so. The bucket allows you to stir in some sugar solution, as food for the remaining yeast still in solution. That last activity, in the bottles, results in carbonation (and also raises alcohol by a negligible 0.1%, or less).

 

The weight of sugar used is a function of the type of sugar, volume and temperature of the beer, and the desired level of carbonation, expressed in volumes of CO2There are websites that will do the calculation for you.

 

In the simplest level, yeast eats sugar, and has alcohol and as CO2 waste. Brewing yeast is better at producing alcohol than baking yeast. You can see the CO2 production from baking yeast when the dough rises, or from the bubbles trapped in bread. 

 

Each bottle ends up having a layer of yeast, typically less than a millimeter, sometimes not even noticeable. The yeast contains B vitamins and chromium, an essential trace mineral. Also, live yeast in your gut keeps you regular. Until your system is used to it, it makes you fart a bit more.

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have you messed with making yeast yet or do you bring it in ? I assume it's the same yeast as bread baking yeast ?

 

As a kid we heard you could make wine by adding a packet of yeast to a bottle of grape juice and topping it with a balloon 

crude I know, but it seemed interesting at the time

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2 hours ago, rrober49 said:

have you messed with making yeast yet or do you bring it in ? I assume it's the same yeast as bread baking yeast ?

 

As a kid we heard you could make wine by adding a packet of yeast to a bottle of grape juice and topping it with a balloon 

crude I know, but it seemed interesting at the time

 

Dozens of different yeast strains are commercially available, each appropriate to the type of beverage being fermented.  Many different ones for wine, many different ones for beer. (& for mead and & for cider). Some are available dry in packets, and some are suspended in a nutrient liquid (and are about 50% more expensive than dry).

For liquid yeast the main manufacturers are American, but there are others too.

 

It used to be that the dry ones for beer were limited in style and not as good. Now the quality is very high and new variants are being manufactured, giving greater variety.

The two main manufacturers of dry yeast are Lalvin (Canada) and SAF (France) but they have factories all over the world.

 

For wine and mead, there is a huge variety of dry packets and the quality is high. Lalvin wine yeast, typically Prise de Mousse (Champagne yeast) is my choice for mead.

 

You can make wine by adding a packet of bread yeast to grape juice, if the grape juice has no preservatives. It will be hazy and will not taste like something you'd want to drink, unless you were in prison. Also, you'll need a way to vent CO2, or it'll spew everywhere, probably blow up.  A much better thing to do is to read a bit and get better and more appropriate ingredients. (All available on line for reputable stores.)

 

But if you really want to do this... and I strongly advise against it... this video has quite a few factual errors, and lots of errors in method, and he's a clumsy guy ... but it will work. And it will make a mess so keep it in a pot. (Not a paper plate as he advises.)  When you're done you'll want to leave the yeast behind when you bottle. It will be disgusting. 😝

 

 

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Labelling today.  That's not just any tartan. Brownie points if you can figure out what tartan it is. 🙂

 

44685894940_14126af671_z.jpg

 

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9 minutes ago, laripu said:

Brownie points if you can figure out what tartan it is

the patern ? goes with a coat of arms or something like that 

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drinking for me is a act of self torture. I get bad hang overs from just a drink

 I do love to make and serve though and If i did get into it I would most likely choose to make brandy

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10 minutes ago, rrober49 said:

the patern ? goes with a coat of arms or something like that 

 

Keep guessing.

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Just now, rrober49 said:

I would most likely choose to make brandy

 

That's distillation. Illegal - very illegal - in the United States. The federal government will make your life hell for that. Don't try it.

 

If it was legal, I'd do it. 

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1 minute ago, laripu said:

That's distillation. Illegal - very illegal - in the United States. The federal government will make your life hell for that. Don't try it.

 

If it was legal, I'd do it. 

 

yeah thats the way my great uncle acted 

 

 guess I now know why he did not like talking about it 

 

apricot as I recall

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17 minutes ago, laripu said:

Keep guessing.

 

come on you I know what you want people to say 😁 I think I will fair better then most without peeking

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1 minute ago, rrober49 said:

 

come on you I know what you want people to say 😁 I think I will fair better then most without peeking

 

Peeking is allowed. It's a very particular registered (i.e. official) tartan. But figuring it out might not be easy.

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Rabbi Mendel Jacobs has dubbed this "Kosher Tartan", and the pattern is registered.

 

Image result for images of tartans

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https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/jewish-tartan

Scottish Jews Have Their Own Official Tartan

It’s kosher!

 

From lochs to legendary castles, haggis to historical firsts, Scotland’s undeniable Gaelic charm is seducing tourists in record numbers. Visitors tend to be eager for all things Highlands, in particular a desire to purchase garments in that most definitive of Scottish patterns: tartan.

Each Scottish clan has its own tartan, a tradition popularized in the Jacobite era in which the novel and currently popular TV show Outlander takes place. Today, many communities compose their own unique tartans that represent a blending of heritages.

Scottish Jews, whose presence in the country was first recorded in the late 17th century, have designed two plaids, one deemed “official.” In 2008, Scottish editor Paul Harris and dentist Clive Schmulian teamed up to create the “Shalom Tartan,” but it wasn’t until later that they chose to register it with the Scottish Tartan Authority. By then, Mendel Jacobs—a Glaswegian Orthodox rabbi—had much the same idea. He’d long noted the increasing popularity of individual tartans for diverse communities of people, including religious and ethnic groups, and organizations like sporting clubs.

-snip-

The Registration Certificate from the International Tartan Index.

- snip -

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2 hours ago, rrober49 said:

show off

 

But he's exactly right. Congratulations Bludoggie!

 

2 hours ago, bludog said:

Rabbi Mendel Jacobs has dubbed this "Kosher Tartan", and the pattern is registered.

 

A few days after starting the Scotch ale I Googled "Jewish tartan", and that exact page came up. I figured that since it's "official" (whatever the fake f**k that means with respect to tartans) I could just steal it. And since Laripu is a fake name, MacLaripu isn't any faker. 😆

 

I officially award you 3.1416 brownie points, redeemable for homebrew and conversation for two at my place in Tampa. Bring ID. Fine print: White supremacists are not eligible.

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I shall not squander my brownie points, but use them wisely, as I guzzle up all the homebrew.😜

 

MacLaripu, chieftain of Clan Maccabee, probably.

 

I didn't have any idea of the name of what I was looking for so I started with Scottish and then Canadian tartans.  Then I tried:  Hockey team tartans, and found out they are rare as chicken lips.  After that I googled "images of tartans" and got a window under which it said "more images".  Clicked on that and got pages of tartans.  I found the perfect match on the third row of the first page and with it, a link to the article.

 

It appears Rabbi Jacobs likes tartan designs.  In addition to the "kosher tartan" pattern adorning his tallis (is that right?), his tie also has a plaid pattern on it.

4 hours ago, bludog said:

Rabbi Mendel Jacobs.

Rabbi Mendel Jacobs.

 

 

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1 hour ago, bludog said:

MacLaripu, chieftain of Clan Maccabee, probably.

 

I didn't have any idea of the name of what I was looking for so I started with Scottish and then Canadian tartans.  Then I tried:  Hockey team tartans, and found out they are rare as chicken lips.  After that I googled "images of tartans" and got a window under which it said "more images".  Clicked on that and got pages of tartans.  I found the perfect match on the third row of the first page and with it, a link to the article.

 

Clan Maccabee, I like that. ☺️

 

I like the way you intelligently followed facts you knew about me to narrow the search. And then, as it often happens, the answer was somewhat unrelated, but resulted from the very act of searching.

 

Louis Pasteur said, "Dans les champs de l'observation le hasard ne favorise que les esprits préparés." i.e. In the fields of observation, luck only favors those with a prepared spirit.

 

Louis Pasteur must be considered the father of modern brewing since he discovered the importance of yeast, bacteria and microorganisms in brewing.

 

CHICKEN_LIPS_BLOG.jpg?w=480&h=480&fit=cl

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3 hours ago, bludog said:

pattern adorning his tallis (is that right?)

 

Correct in Yiddish. The word comes from Hebrew "tallit".

 

The difference stems from a difference in pronunciation between Yiddish and Ashkenazic Hebrew and modern Hebrew. In modern Hebrew, the letter tav ת is always pronounced like a t (and Hebrew has a total of two t letters, tet and tav). In Yiddish and Ashkenazic Hebrew it can be pronounced as either s or t, depending on the location of a diacritic mark. So tallis or tallit. (In NYC, probably the former, in Tel Aviv, the latter.)

 

To make it more confusing, modern Hebrew also has two s letters. One of those can also be sh, depending on a diacritical mark which is rarely written except for children. Adults are supposed to know which pronunciation from context. That letter has a connection to Star Trek, via Leonard Nimoy. 🖖 ש

 

Hebrew is ancient, illogical, confusing and possibly (😉:rolleyes:) god's punishment to Jews.

 

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