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bludog

Alien Worlds, Fantasy Worlds

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1 hour ago, bludog said:

 

Image result for fantasy worlds with planets in the sky

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Related image

 

 

 

 

 

Those look familiar to me.☺️

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On 11/30/2018 at 1:07 PM, TDS said:

Those look familiar to me.☺️

 

Probably were cover art on SciFi paperbacks.  Very imaginative.  It seems nearly impossible to get the names of the artists who painted some of these inspired paintings.

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On 11/30/2018 at 1:07 PM, TDS said:

Those look familiar to me.☺️

 

I got them by googling "fantasy images of alien worlds with planets in the sky"  and "fantasy worlds".  The artists' names were not presented with the images.  But the images, IMO, are worth consideration.  If one is so inclined, immersion in any one of them can evoke much more than the painting itself.

 

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"There are times, Caterina, when I find myself transfixed by a shadow on the wall, or the splashing of water against a stone. I stare at it, the hours pass, the world around me drops away... replaced by worlds being created and destroyed by my imagination."
― Leonardo Da Vinci (Star Trek Voyager)

 

 

 

Images of Vincent Van Gogh's Starry  Night have probably had billions of looks and even more words, written about this one painting.

A painting of a scene at night with 10 swirly stars, Venus, and a bright yellow crescent Moon. In the background there are hills, in the middle ground there is a moonlit town with a church that has an elongated steeple, and in the foreground there is the dark green silhouette of a cypress tree and houses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hieronymus Bosch - The Garden of Earthly Delights  painted late 1400 AD.   (Too bad it can't be larger)

1920px-El_jard%C3%ADn_de_las_Delicias%2C

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Enlargement of the "Hell" panel, above, right.

800px-Hieronymus_Bosch_-_The_Garden_of_E

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I find it interesting that the very best graphic art the world has ever seen is being produced right now in popular and commercial art.  And yet, many of today's artists are valued so little, their works appear on the internet without even referring to them.  While paintings of the old masters sell for ten or hundreds of thousands of dollars.

 

The old masters were pioneers.  They are to be respected.  But technically and for variety of subject matter, they don't hold a candle to today's best.

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2 hours ago, bludog said:

The old masters were pioneers.  They are to be respected.  But technically and for variety of subject matter, they don't hold a candle to today's best.

 

Computers give you technique. But technique is no substitute for imagination. Bosch still has no equal.

 

I'm lucky enough to live near the Salvador Dali museum in St. Petersburg, Florida,  across the bay from my home in Tampa.  https://thedali.org It was created by the Morse family, an American couple who collected many of his works and knew him personally.

 

Also, on a business trip to France in 2002, I took a day off and went to the Salvador Dali museum in Figueres, Spain, designed by Dali himself. (Four hour drive to get there, then for hours back to Toulouse ... 100% worth it.)  https://www.salvador-dali.org/en/

 

One of Dali's small paintings, a miniature, is of a room. When looked at from a distance, it looks like Mae West. Paintings in the wall of the room form her eyes. The fireplace, with a clock on it, is her noise, and sofa in the forground is her mouth. Her hair is made by curtains in the entrance.

 

In Figueres, Dali made the room. A whole room, just like the painting, but 3-dimensional. But he still wanted you to be able to see it flat like the painting, to see Mae West. So he set up a lens. You had to climb up some steps to look through the lens, and then you could see the room, flattened, and Mae West obviously appearing as the room.

 

Then, because he was Salvador Dali, the mirror hung from the belly of a stuffed camel that had been dressed in a military uniform. In the last picture you can see the camel and her hair, but for some reason the camel isn't in a military uniform. Maybe it was being cleaned. People are climbing up the stairs to look through the lens.

 

 

face_of_mae_west_c_1935.jpg

 

3495455320_037111bb14_b.jpg

 

10-13-15-figueres-dali-005.jpg

 

wpid7298-20141016-DSC02080.jpg

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Thanks for the images which illustrate your text.

 

29 minutes ago, laripu said:

Bosch still has no equal.

 

That is a matter of opinion.  Don't get me wrong.  I'm a big Bosch fan.  With no predecessors to give him even a hint, Bosch was a creative giant of his, or any other time.

 

I've spent many enjoyable days in NYC, gazing at Dali's works in the Guggenheim, the Museum of Modern Art and the Museum of Metropolitan Art.  From time-to-time, many of Dali's original paintings were borrowed from the museums you mention and temporarily put on display in NYC.  The same for Bosch.

 

As much as I like and admire Dali's works, I find it difficult to enter his paintings and vicariously participate in his surreal scenarios.  But it works with Bosch, for me.  Similarly, the fantasy images I showed in this thread invite the viewer to imagine entering and participating.

 

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2 hours ago, rrober49 said:

Related image

 

This is the first time I saw it.  Cool, both literally and figuratively.  There's a whole story in there, depending on what one sees in it.  Could be the basis for a SciFi movie.

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11 minutes ago, bludog said:

As much as I like and admire Dali's works, I find it difficult to enter his paintings and vicariously participate in his surreal scenarios. 

 

Sometimes I had difficulty, when I didn't know where an image came from. Sheep, for example. Dali had odd-looking sheep in some of his paintings.

 

Driving back from Figueres to Toulouse I took a wrong turn trying to find the highway. I ended up in sheep farming country, maybe 5 minutes from the museum. The live sheep all looked like the sheep in the paintings. So I suddenly understood.

 

Sometimes it's that simple.

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It's interesting that Bosch was a contemporary of Copernicus, who, seemingly without prior guidance, contributed to Cosmology as much as Bosch gave to graphic art.

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2 hours ago, laripu said:

Computers give you technique. But technique is no substitute for imagination.

 

No computer yet is capable of anything near the imagination and inventiveness required to conceive something like this.

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I like the art I can finish by placing myself into, tends to lean to abstract . I like to resolve

 

 I wonder, if the garden of earthly delights depicted stick people, would we still not not walk up and look closer to find ourselves ? It's like "where in the world is waldo" 1.0

  I do not mean to demean the work to waldo so much as ponder the evolution of the art's concept of "come find yourself"

 

 

 So in our fantasy world we got Bludog chasing sprites, I am exploring the unknown and Laripu is curled up on a pair of hot lips by a warm nostril using a bone saw to split open a camel..

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4 hours ago, rrober49 said:

I like the art I can finish by placing myself into, tends to lean to abstract . I like to resolve

 

Interesting.

 

4 hours ago, rrober49 said:

So in our fantasy world we got Bludog chasing sprites, I am exploring the unknown and Laripu is curled up on a pair of hot lips by a warm nostril using a bone saw to split open a camel..

 

You are very kind to yourself.

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hey a lot can happen in the unknown. I might need to eat all those other people. I think the sprite is the best deal

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Interesting painting.  ^    ^    ^    Looks like it could be an illustration for a scifi story.  If so, I wonder which one.  Dune comes to mind but that's not a sandworm.  Neither do people climb on the sandworms in Dune.

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1 hour ago, bludog said:

Dune comes to mind but that's not a sandworm.

 

How do you know?  

 

(That's from the cover of a Avalon Hill game box called ... DUNE)

 

Quote

Neither do people climb on the sandworms in Dune.

 

I suppose if you don't call Freemen people ...

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Yes, people do climb on the creature in Dune.  But as you can see below, it's usually rendered with a differently shaped mouth.

 

Sheeanaandworm.JPG

 

 

Image result for "dune" sandworm image

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2 hours ago, bludog said:

Yes, people do climb on the creature in Dune.  But as you can see below, it's usually rendered with a differently shaped mouth.

 

Sheeanaandworm.JPG

 

 

Image result for "dune" sandworm image

 

When Jessica and Paul Atreides first encounter a sandworm and are trying to escape, the book describes ( https://archive.org/stream/frank-herbert-dune-1-dune/frank-herbert-dune-1-dune_djvu.txt ) the mouth as “a round, black hole with edges glistening in the moonlight.”  Then it says “Its mouth was some eighty meters in diameter ... crystal teeth with the curved shape of crysknives glinting around the rim”.  There is no mention of anything but a round hole, bludog.   There’s also a reference later to sandworms that says “The thing was only minutes away now, filling the morning with the friction-hissing of its passage. Its great teeth within the cavern-circle of its mouth spread like some enormous flower.”   The mouth is described as a “cavern-circle” in shape with teeth "glinting around the rim".   Also, the size of your worms is off.  The mouth is supposed to be 80 meters in diameter, not 2-4 meters as your pictures suggest.    So I think the artist who drew the sandworm I posted is much closer to what Herbert envisioned than the ones who drew yours.   Just saying …

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