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Do not go gentle into that good night

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“All men have stars, but they are not the same things for different people. For some, who are travelers, the stars are guides. For others they are no more than little lights in the sky. For others, who are scholars, they are problems... But all these stars are silent. You-You alone will have stars as no one else has them... In one of the stars I shall be living. In one of them I shall be laughing. And so it will be as if all the stars will be laughing when you look at the sky at night..You, only you, will have stars that can laugh! And when your sorrow is comforted (time soothes all sorrows) you will be content that you have known me... You will always be my friend. You will want to laugh with me. And you will sometimes open your window, so, for that pleasure... It will be as if, in place of the stars, I had given you a great number of little bells that knew how to laugh” 
 Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

 

 

 

"Please tame me!' he said.

'I want to, very much,' the little prince replied. 'But I have not much time. I have friends to discover, and a great many things to understand.'

'One only understands the things that one tames,' said the fox. 'Men have no more time to understand anything. They buy things all ready made at the shops. But there is no shop anywhere where one can buy friendship, and so men have no friends any more. If you want a friend, tame me.'

'What must I do, to tame you?' asked the little prince.

'You must be very patient,' replied the fox. 'First you will sit down at a little distance from me-like that-in the grass. I shall look at you out of the corner of my eye, and you will say nothing. Words are the source of misunderstandings. But you will sit a little closer to me, every day...” 
 Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

 

 

 

"What matters most are the simple pleasures so abundant that we can all enjoy them...Happiness doesn't lie in the objects we gather around us. To find it, all we need to do is open our eyes.” 
 Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

 

 

 

“The little prince went away, to look again at the roses.

"You are not at all like my rose," he said. "As yet you are nothing. No one has tamed you, and you have tamed no one. You are like my fox when I first knew him. He was only a fox like a hundred thousand other foxes. But I have made him my friend, and now he is unique in all the world."

And the roses were very much embarassed.

"You are beautiful, but you are empty," he went on. "One could not die for you. To be sure, an ordinary passerby would think that my rose looked just like you--the rose that belongs to me. But in herself alone she is more important than all the hundreds of you other roses: because it is she that I have watered; because it is she that I have put under the glass globe; because it is she that I have sheltered behind the screen; because it is for her that I have killed the caterpillars (except the two or three that we saved to become butterflies); because it is she that I have listened to, when she grumbled, or boasted, or ever sometimes when she said nothing. Because she is my rose.” 
 Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, The Little Prince

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5 hours ago, LoreD said:

“The little prince went away, to look again at the roses.

 

Good stuff.  Sensitive, romantic prose.   Not my cup of tea, but I can appreciate it.

 

Quite a guy was Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.  A man of letters and a man of action.  He was one of the early pioneers of international postal flight.   His wrote award-winning books about his exploits as a combat pilot and other adventures; enough for several lifetimes.  

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antoine_de_Saint-Exupéry   

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40 minutes ago, bludog said:

 

Good stuff.  Sensitive, romantic prose.   Not my cup of tea, but I can appreciate it.

 

 

OK, nothing sensitive and romantic for you.

 

Twelfth-Century Knight-Troubadour Bertran de Born

 

Be’m plai lo gais temps de pascor[1]

Well do I love the cheerful spring,

which brings the leaves and flowers;

and I also love to hear the merriment of the birds,

who send their song ringing through the woods;

and I am glad to see tents and pavilions

pitched in the meadows.

Great is my joy when I see knights and armored horses

ranged on the battlefield.

 

And I like to see the foragers

send the people and the cattle fleeing before them

and it pleases me when I see many soldiers

come running after them;

and it warms my heart to see strong castles besieged,

the palisades smashed and broken down,

and to see the army on the river-bank

protected on all sides by ditches,

and strong, tight-made palisades.

 

And I am well pleased by a lord

when he is the first to attack,

on horseback, armored, fearless:

thus does he inspire his men

with boldness, and worthy courage.

And when the battle is joined

each man must be ready

to follow him with joy:

for no man is held to be worthy

until he has taken and given many blows.

Maces and swords, colorful helms,

shields riven and cast aside:

these shall we see at the start of the battle,

and also many vassals struck down,

the horses of the dead and wounded running wild.

And when he enters the combat,

let every man of good lineage

think of nothing but splitting heads and hacking arms;

for it is better to die than to live in defeat.

 

I tell you, I find no such savor

in eating or drinking or sleeping

as when I hear the cries of “attack!”

from both sides, and the noise

of riderless horses in the shadows;

and I hear screams of “Help! Help!”

and I see great and small alike

falling into the grassy ditches

and the dead

with splintered lances, bedecked with pennons

through their sides.

 

Love wants a chivalrous lover

skilled at arms and generous in serving

who speaks well and gives greatly,

who knows what he should do and say,

in or out of his hall,

as befits his power.

He should be full of hospitality, courtesy, and good cheer.

A lady who lies with such a lover as that

is clean of all her sins.

 

 

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18 minutes ago, LoreD said:

I tell you, I find no such savor

in eating or drinking or sleeping

as when I hear the cries of “attack!”

from both sides, and the noise

of riderless horses in the shadows;

and I hear screams of “Help! Help!”

and I see great and small alike

falling into the grassy ditches

and the dead

with splintered lances, bedecked with pennons

through their sides.

 

Heh heh.  When I say sensitive and romantic isn't my cup of tea, it doesn't mean I like crude, artless and sadistic. 

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Just now, bludog said:

 

Heh heh.  When I say sensitive and romantic isn't my cup of tea, it doesn't mean I like crude, artless and sadistic. 

 

 

lol

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When You Are Old 

When you are old and grey and full of sleep,
And nodding by the fire, take down this book,
And slowly read, and dream of the soft look
Your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep;
 
How many loved your moments of glad grace,
And loved your beauty with love false or true,
But one man loved the pilgrim soul in you,
And loved the sorrows of your changing face;
 
And bending down beside the glowing bars,
Murmur, a little sadly, how Love fled
And paced upon the mountains overhead
And hid his face amid a crowd of stars.

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The Lake Isle of Innisfree

W. B. Yeats, 1865 - 1939

I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made:
Nine bean-rows will I have there, a hive for the honey-bee;
And live alone in the bee-loud glade.

And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow,
Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings;
There midnight’s all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow,
And evening full of the linnet’s wings.

I will arise and go now, for always night and day
I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore;
While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements grey,
I hear it in the deep heart’s core.

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This Land Is Your Land

by

 

This land is your land, this land is my land
From California to the New York Island
From the Redwood Forest to the Gulf Stream waters
This land was made for you and me.

As I was walking that ribbon of highway
I saw above me that endless skyway
I saw below me that golden valley
This land was made for you and me.

I roamed and I rambled and I followed my footsteps
To the sparkling sands of her diamond deserts
While all around me a voice was sounding
This land was made for you and me.

When the sun came shining, and I was strolling
And the wheat fields waving and the dust clouds rolling
A voice was chanting, As the fog was lifting,
This land was made for you and me.

This land is your land, this land is my land
From California to the New York Island
From the Redwood Forest to the Gulf Stream waters
This land was made for you and me.

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Pete Seeger

 

We Shall Overcome Someday

 

We shall overcome
We shall overcome
We shall overcome, some day

Oh, deep in my heart
I do believe
We shall overcome, some day

We'll walk hand in hand
We'll walk hand in hand
We'll walk hand in hand, some day

Oh, deep in my heart
I do believe
We shall overcome, some day

We shall live in peace
We shall live in peace
We shall live in peace, some day

Oh, deep in my heart
I do believe
We shall overcome, some day

We are not afraid
We are not afraid
We are not afraid, TODAY

 

Oh, deep in my heart
I do believe
We shall overcome, some day

The whole wide world around
The whole wide world around
The whole wide world around some day

Oh, deep in my heart
I do believe
We shall overcome, some day

 

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Go, soul, the body’s guest,
Upon a thankless errand;
Fear not to touch the best;
The truth shall be thy warrant.
Go, since I needs must die,
And give the world the lie.
 
Say to the court, it glows
And shines like rotten wood;
Say to the church, it shows
What’s good, and doth no good.
If church and court reply,
Then give them both the lie.
 
Tell potentates, they live
Acting by others’ action;
Not loved unless they give,
Not strong but by a faction.
If potentates reply,
Give potentates the lie.
 
Tell men of high condition,
That manage the estate,
Their purpose is ambition,
Their practice only hate.
And if they once reply,
Then give them all the lie.
 
Tell them that brave it most,
They beg for more by spending,
Who, in their greatest cost,
Seek nothing but commending.
And if they make reply,
Then give them all the lie.
 
Tell zeal it wants devotion;
Tell love it is but lust;
Tell time it is but motion;
Tell flesh it is but dust.
And wish them not reply,
For thou must give the lie.
 
Tell age it daily wasteth;
Tell honor how it alters;
Tell beauty how she blasteth;
Tell favor how it falters.
And as they shall reply,
Give every one the lie.
 
Tell wit how much it wrangles
In tickle points of niceness;
Tell wisdom she entangles
Herself in overwiseness.
And when they do reply,
Straight give them both the lie.
 
Tell physic of her boldness;
Tell skill it is pretension;
Tell charity of coldness;
Tell law it is contention.
And as they do reply,
So give them still the lie.
 
Tell fortune of her blindness;
Tell nature of decay;
Tell friendship of unkindness;
Tell justice of delay.
And if they will reply,
Then give them all the lie.
 
Tell arts they have no soundness,
But vary by esteeming;
Tell schools they want profoundness,
And stand too much on seeming.
If arts and schools reply,
Give arts and schools the lie.
 
Tell faith it’s fled the city;
Tell how the country erreth;
Tell manhood shakes off pity;
Tell virtue least preferreth.
And if they do reply,
Spare not to give the lie.
 
So when thou hast, as I
Commanded thee, done blabbing—
Although to give the lie
Deserves no less than stabbing—
Stab at thee he that will,
No stab the soul can kill.
 
 

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Fall, leaves, fall

Fall, leaves, fall; die, flowers, away;
Lengthen night and shorten day;
Every leaf speaks bliss to me
Fluttering from the autumn tree.
I shall smile when wreaths of snow
Blossom where the rose should grow;
I shall sing when night’s decay
Ushers in a drearier day.

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19 hours ago, bludog said:

Fall, leaves, fall

Fall, leaves, fall; die, flowers, away;
Lengthen night and shorten day;
Every leaf speaks bliss to me
Fluttering from the autumn tree.
I shall smile when wreaths of snow
Blossom where the rose should grow;
I shall sing when night’s decay
Ushers in a drearier day.

 

“Spring and Fall” (1880)           Gerard Manley Hopkins

 

To a young child 

Margaret, are you grieving 
Over Goldengrove unleaving? 
Leaves, like the things of man, you 
With your fresh thoughts care for, can you? 
Ah! as the heart grows older 
It will come to such sights colder 
By and by, nor spare a sigh 
Though worlds of wanwood leafmeal lie; 
And yet you will weep know why. 
Now no matter, child, the name: 
Sorrow’s springs are the same. 
Nor mouth had, no nor mind, expressed 
What heart heard of, ghost guessed: 
It is the blight man was born for, 
It is Margaret you mourn for.

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1 hour ago, laripu said:

“Spring and Fall” (1880)           Gerard Manley Hopkins

 

Very moving.

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Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven

W. B. Yeats, 1865 - 1939

Had I the heavens’ embroidered cloths,   
Enwrought with golden and silver light,   
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths   
Of night and light and the half light,   
I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;   
I have spread my dreams under your feet;   
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.

 

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5 hours ago, LoreD said:

Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven

 

Wow.  Original and enchantingly put.

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The  Bereaved  Maid

Medieval.  Author Unknown

 

Lully, lullay, lully, lullay!

The falcon hath borne my mate away

 

He bare him up, he bare him down.

He bare him into an orchard brown.

 

And in that orchard there was a hall.

That was hanged with purple and pall;

 

And in that hall there was a bed.

It was decked in gold and red.

 

And in that bed there lieth a knight,

His woundes bleeding day and night;

 

By that bedside kneeleth a may,

And she weepeth both night and day;

 

And by that bedside there standeth a stone,

Corpus Christi  written thereon.

 

==============================================================================================================

 

Evidently there was anti-war sentiment, even in the middle-ages.

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5 hours ago, TDS said:

"Howl"

 

It's been a   l -- o -- n -- g   time since I read that  ....  

 

An ode to the beat generation.   In praise of libertine sex, drug induced states and rejection of conformist ideas of comfort and convention.  And one example of many avant-garde literary forms the beats embraced.  Along with figures like William Burroughs, Jack Kerouac and others the Beats later gave rise to the Hippies and one of their seminal inspirations, Timothy Leary with his entreaty to "Turn on, tune in and drop out".   

 

Just my 2 cents.

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6 minutes ago, bludog said:

 

It's been a   l -- o -- n -- g   time since I read that  ....  

 

An ode to the beat generation.   In praise of libertine sex, drug induced states and rejection of conformist ideas of comfort and convention.  And one example of many avant-garde literary forms the beats embraced.  Along with figures like William Burroughs, Jack Kerouac and others the Beats later gave rise to the Hippies and one of their seminal inspirations, Timothy Leary with his entreaty to "Turn on, tune in and drop out".   

 

Just my 2 cents.

 

Correcto mungo.

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The pennycandystore beyond the El

From "A Coney Island Of The Mind ", a collection of poems by Lawrence Ferlinghetti

 

 

The pennycandystore beyond the El
is where i first
fell in love
with unreality
Jellybeans glowed in the semi-gloom
of that september afternoon
A cat upon the counter moved among
the licorice sticks
and tootsie rolls
and Oh Boy Gum

Outside the leaves were falling as they died

A wind had blown away the sun

A girl ran in
Her hair was rainy
Her breasts were breathless in the little room

Outside the leaves were falling
and they cried
Too soon! too soon!

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