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Skans

Truth Revealed - Ted Turner Was Behind The Georgia Guidestones

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Ultra Liberal, Robert Edward "Ted" Turner III, played the part of R.C. Christian who caused the Georgia Guidestones to be constructed in Elbert County, Georgia.  In 1980, a man using the fictitious name of R.C. Christian, through a local banker who swore to keep Christian's true identity a secret,  constructed a Stonehenge like set of granite monuments with guidelines or principles engraved in eight different languages.  In 1980, the land was purchased for $5,000 and the granite monuments were erected at a cost of $125,000.

 

The guidelines set forth in the Georgia Guidestones, however, is not of Christian or Biblical origin at all.  It contains a set of agnostic, leftist, man-inspired messages:

 

  1. Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.
  2. Guide reproduction wisely — improving fitness and diversity.
  3. Unite humanity with a living new language.
  4. Rule passion — faith — tradition — and all things with tempered reason.
  5. Protect people and nations with fair laws and just courts.
  6. Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court.
  7. Avoid petty laws and useless officials.
  8. Balance personal rights with social duties.
  9. Prize truth — beauty — love — seeking harmony with the infinite.
  10. Be not a cancer on the earth — Leave room for nature — Leave room for nature.

 

So, who is Ted Turner?  Former husband of Jane Fonda; nemesis of Rupert Murdoch, and creator of Cable News Network - CNN.  Ted Turner merged CNN with Time-Warner in 1996, and essentially "sold" CNN to AOL-Time Warner in 2000.  However, Ted Turner left an odd leftist philosophical legacy which has stayed with CNN since its inception.  The above 10 principles are in all actuality, the CNN Guidestones.

 

Now you know.

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Which of these statements do you agree with? With which do you disagree?

I would say that Ted has the right to spend  his money on these if he wishes.

I doubt that Jane Fonda had anything to do with them.

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Which of these statements do you agree with? With which do you disagree?

I would say that Ted has the right to spend  his money on these if he wishes.

I doubt that Jane Fonda had anything to do with them.

I agree with #4.  I do not necessarily oppose all of the other 9 "guidelines", but I also think there are more important guidelines that I would choose.  I also think some of them are nonsense.  However, I think you need to keep in mind that in 1980, when this was erected, the prevailing thought was that we would be decimated by nuclear war and that society would have to start anew.  I think this monument was intended to speak to people remaking society after a huge disaster rather than to any of us today.

 

As far as Ted Turner spending his money how he pleases, I have no problem with that at all.  I just find it odd that someone had to use a pseudonym "R.C. Christian" to do something like this and be cryptic about who backed the endeavor.  I have no idea what, if anything, Jane Fonda had to do with the Guidestones.

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R. C. could stand for "Roman Catholic", I suppose.

I would not call Ted Turner any sort of "ultra liberal".

He is perhaps the owner of more real estates than any individual in this country, so I doubt he believes that 'Property is theft'.

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R. C. could stand for "Roman Catholic", I suppose.

No.  It's actually a bit more cryptic than that.  R.C. more likely stands for "Rose Cross".  The Rose Cross is associated with Christian Rosenkreuz, and when taken in context with he writing on the Guidestones likely is a reference to Rosicrucian Enlightenment and/or Freemasonry.   If you take it any further than that, you need to choose which rabbit hole you want to go down - Freemasonry and modern Rosicrucianism ; Deism, Thomas Pain and the Age of Reason; or something more "sinister" such as early Aleister Crowley and the Ordo Templi Orientis.

 

I actually find the Guidestones quirky, but interesting.   It's on my bucket-list to go check out the Guidestones some day for myself, if vandals haven't destroyed it by then.

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