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48 minutes ago, bludog said:

In the news today:---

 

Dairy Giant Launches Vegan Cheese Described As 'Trailblazing'

The new dairy-free option from Applewood is aimed at vegans, vegetarians, and flexitarians
Plant Based News
23 hours ago
< snip >
The cheese, which took cooks and nutritionists two years of research and development to perfect, has the same smoked flavor as its dairy-based counterpart is a collaboration between Applewood and VBites, the UK’s pioneering and award-winning plant-based food company owned by vegan businesswoman Heather Mills. It will be made in of one Mills’ three allergen-free factories in the North East.
 
apple-wood-vegan-cheese-bagel.jpg

 

 

Good News!

 

I've been a little disappointed in the vegan cheese lines.  I hope this brand is a little better.

 

Earth Balance brought out a stick butter substitute, and  I was pleased with it.  I had been a little angry about all the vegans butters in the plastic tubs.

 

Kroger just put a plant based section in the meat section.  Everything, except for Beyond Beef sausages, was in plastic trays.  Sigh!

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2 hours ago, LoreD said:

 

 

Good News!

 

I've been a little disappointed in the vegan cheese lines.  I hope this brand is a little better.

 

Earth Balance brought out a stick butter substitute, and  I was pleased with it.  I had been a little angry about all the vegans butters in the plastic tubs.

 

Kroger just put a plant based section in the meat section.  Everything, except for Beyond Beef sausages, was in plastic trays.  Sigh!

 

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13 minutes ago, bludog said:

 

We need to regulate single use plastics.

 

Biodegradable Sandwich Bags (XL 100 Count Quart Bags)

 

 
Amazon'sChoicefor "sandwich bags compostable"
 
  • 100 PERCENT FOOD GRADE CELLOPHANE These clear cellophane bags are made from oriented polypropylene, an odorless, non-toxic and eco-friendly material
  • CRISP, CLEAN PACKAGING With its totally transparent material, these cellophane bags have a resealable adhesive strip that provides a professional and attractive look while keeping out moisture, dust and mildew
  • ULTRA DURABLE Measuring 6 inches by 9 inches, these non-gusseted bags are strong and protective and will keep your treats fresh and tasty for longer
  • BUY IN BULK Available in a set of 200 pieces, you can get these cellophane bags in abundance to help save money on your business supplies
  • PROFESSIONAL USE: Multi-functional high quality 1.2mil thick cello bags are perfect to wrap party favors, candies, cookies & treats. They're also great for storing materials for arts & crafts and much more!
 
 
 

Price: $19.99  FREE One-Day
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3 hours ago, LoreD said:

100 PERCENT FOOD GRADE CELLOPHANE These clear cellophane bags are made from oriented polypropylene, an odorless, non-toxic and eco-friendly material

 

The above claim contradicts itself since Cellophane and oriented polypropylene are two different materials;  polypropylene being far less biodegradable.  Some of the Amazon reviewers say that on the package, the material listed is low density polyethylene, which is also non-biodegradable. And the bags are expensive.  It might be that the manufacturer thought to market the bags deceptively so he could charge more.

 

Caveat Emptor.

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2 hours ago, bludog said:

 

The above claim contradicts itself since Cellophane and oriented polypropylene are two different materials;  polypropylene being far less biodegradable.  Some of the Amazon reviewers say that on the package, the material listed is low density polyethylene, which is also non-biodegradable. And the bags are expensive.  It might be that the manufacturer thought to market the bags deceptively so he could charge more.

 

Caveat Emptor.

 

 

Well, there is always the old method of wax paper bags.  

 

Natural Kraft Brown Paper Snack Sandwich Bags + White Stickers for Sealing. 100% Chlorine-Free, Unbleached, Eco Alternative to Plastic Fold Top/Zippered Bags. Made in USA. 125 Sleeves/Pack

 

 
 
 
 

Price: $14.95 ($0.12 / Count) 
 
 
 
  • eco sandwich bags
  • 125 QUALITY, 100% CHLORINE-FREE, UNBLEACHED, DRY WAX KRAFT PAPER DELI SANDWICH BAGS & 1-INCH ROUND STICKERS - the environmentally friendly disposable bag for lunch, snacks, cookies, party favors and more!
  • MEASURES 8” LONG, 6” WIDE WITH A 1” DEEP GUSSET/PLEAT, this large bag has a nice wide opening to easily slip in sandwiches, soft pretzels, large/jumbo cookies and other treats.
  • ECO-FRIENDLY ALTERNATIVE TO PLASTIC fold top or ziploc sandwich bags. Slide your food into the bag, fold over the top and secure with the sticker!
  • WRITE-ON STICKER SEALS THE BAG CLOSED and gives you the option to label the contents, draw an emoticon or just write a quick 'Hi' or 'Love You' message! NOTE: The sticker has a low-gloss finish, so a sharpie pen or other marker works best.
  • GREASE- RESISTANT, DRY WAX PAPER BAGS are made in the USA from an FDA-approved soy blend eco-wax, and are great for greasy foods, buttery cookies, pastries and other messy foods.

 

 

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Nestle's now joins Tyson, Kellog's and Kroger in jumping into the plant-based meat market with its "Awesome Burger".  Nestle's, the world's largest food corporation, believes imitation meat, in all its forms, is here to stay.  There is talk of a deal between Nestle's and McDonald's, which doesn't offer a plant-based alternative yet.

 

While "Impossible Foods" and "Beyond Meat" have a head start on the the Big Boys, they will now have to deal with competition which has better access to food supply chains and can take advantage of economies of scale.

 

https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/24/business/nestle-awesome-burger-plant-based-meat/index.html

Quote

 

<snip>

Monterey County, where Moss Landing is situated, is the perfect place for a vegetarian business. Home of the Salinas Valley, the so-called "salad bowl of the world," it's one of the most productive agricultural areas on the planet, growing more than 150 crops including lettuce — lots of lettuce. It's been Sweet Earth's home for years, well before Nestlé acquired the then 350-person company in 2017. But these days, it's turning into something else — Nestlé's Plant-Based Protein Center of Excellence, the beating heart of the massive food company's recent foray into fake meat.
At the Moss Landing facility, where factory workers crank out the wheat-gluten-based Benevolent Bacon responsible for the scent, changes are afoot. Nestlé is spending more than $5 million to renovate the facility, adding new equipment, more freezer capacity, "meat" smokers and more. Construction is underway, and soon employees will start making a slew of new products, including the Awesome Burger, Nestlé's answer to the Impossible and Beyond Meat burgers.
<snip>

 

 
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Just now, bludog said:

Nestle's now joins Tyson, Kellog's and Kroger in jumping into the plant-based meat market with its "Awesome Burger".  Nestle's, the world's largest food corporation, believes imitation meat, in all its forms, is here to stay.  There is talk of a deal between Nestle's and McDonald's, which doesn't offer a plant-based alternative yet.

 

While "Impossible Foods" and "Beyond Meat" have a head start on the the Big Boys, they will now have to deal with competition which has better access to food supply chains and can take advantage of economies of scale.

 

https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/24/business/nestle-awesome-burger-plant-based-meat/index.html

 

 

I think competition might bring down some of the prices.  I gave the Burger King Impossible burger another try.  Really good this time, but a burger that is twice the price of a regular Whopper may deter some people.  The "small" Impossible Burger meal was almost $9.

 

I didn't mind as an occasional treat, but I couldn't afford it too often.

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3 hours ago, LoreD said:

I think competition might bring down some of the prices. 

 

Hopefully it will, but no guarantee.  When monopolies are able to put the smaller guys out of business or buy them out, they often collude to keep prices artificially high.  And some of the Big Agra companies like Nestle's and Tyson also have ownership in the livestock industry, causing internal conflicts.

 

And then there's cultured meat which is poised for market entry:

https://cellbasedtech.com/lab-grown-meat-companies

 

But the good news is that imitation meat seems to be getting more popular.

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1 hour ago, bludog said:

 

Hopefully it will, but no guarantee.  When monopolies are able to put the smaller guys out of business or buy them out, they often collude to keep prices artificially high.  And some of the Big Agra companies like Nestle's and Tyson also have ownership in the livestock industry, causing internal conflicts.

 

And then there's cultured meat which is poised for market entry:

https://cellbasedtech.com/lab-grown-meat-companies

 

But the good news is that imitation meat seems to be getting more popular.

 

Vegan Seafood Is About To Become Big Business--And Not A Moment Too Soon

 

 

 

 

Overfishing has become catastrophic. A report by Nature Communications in 2016 found that far more fish have been caught globally between 1950 and 2010 than was admitted, leading to a sharp decline in the number of fish in the sea. Industrial fisheries using large commercial machinery to trawl the ocean bed result in millions of other sea animals, including whales, dolphins and turtles, getting trapped and killed in nets – known as ‘bycatch’. Aquaculture – essentially the factory farming of fish – poses a host of health and environmental hazards.

 

Meanwhile, slave labor, which is particularly rife in the shrimp industry, poses ethical problems, as does the issue of animal cruelty, something often overlooked when it comes to sea creatures. Scientific evidence has found that fish are sentient and feel both physical and emotional pain, as do crabs, lobsters and other crustaceans.

 

Fortunately there are a group of entrepreneurs stepping up to provide a practical, sustainable and cruelty-free solution to these problems: Plant-based alternatives to popular seafood products.

 

California-based Sophie’s Kitchen led the field when it launched in 2011 with a range of plant-based canned tuna, frozen crab cakes, fish fillets and shrimp, along with frozen and refrigerated smoked salmon. The products are free from soy and gluten, are non-GMO and kosher. Key ingredients are konjac (also known as elephant yam), which is popular in Japanese cuisine, and yellow pea.

 

Sophie's Kitchen's vegan canned tuna is stocked predominantly in the fish aisles, next to regular canned fish.

Sophie's Kitchen's vegan canned tuna is stocked predominantly in the fish aisles, next to regular canned fish.

 SOPHIE'S KITCHEN

Over the past three years, buoyed by the surge in demand for plant-based products, several new players have entered the vegan seafood scene – and investors are queuing up to fund them.

 

Ocean Hugger Foods in New York has made a splash in the restaurant and food service sector with its raw tuna, Ahimi, which CEO David Benzaquen says is the world’s first plant-based alternative to raw tuna, for use in dishes such as sushi, ceviche, poke, tartare and crudo.

 

Created by certified master chef James Corwell and launched onto the market in November 2017, Ahimi is currently sold in approximately 50 Whole Foods stores across the US, in college and corporate cafeterias run by institutional food service providers Aramark and Bon Appetit Management Company, including the offices of  Twitter, and in independent restaurants in the US and Canada.

 

According to Benzaquen, the first poke restaurant to carry the product – Westcoast Poke in Vancouver, Canada – sold over 300 pounds of Ahimi in just one location in the eatery’s first month of carrying it. And just a couple of months ago, Nishimoto Trading Company, a publicly-traded Japanese company, and one of Ocean Hugger’s primary investors and distributors, announced that it plans to roll out Ahimi globally.

Ahimi is sold as a food service ingredient, not as a packaged food product for consumers to take home and cook with. Even in retail establishments like Whole Foods, it’s sold at the sushi bar in the rolls, not on the shelf. “We decided to sell it this way because most consumers don’t make raw fish dishes at home,” explains Benzaquen. “Instead, most people buy these dishes ready-made in restaurants. By selling it to chefs to make at their restaurants we’re bypassing having to teach consumers to make raw fish dishes and then to also make them plant-based.”

 

Designed to be an alternative to ahi tuna, with a savory, meaty taste, Ahimi is made with five simple ingredients, the key one being tomato. The texture and flavor of the tomato are transformed through a special technique and the product has been hailed in several quarters for its realistic taste to actual tuna.

 
 
In addition to vegans, vegetarians and flexitarians, Ahimi is aimed at those with seafood allergies or people who choose not to eat raw fish for safety reasons, such as pregnant women, the elderly and infirm, and those who are immuno-compromised. “It’s also great for anyone looking for clean, plant-based products or avoiding tuna and other endangered species for sustainability reasons,” says Benzaquen, who himself switched to plant-based eating after witnessing the suffering of fish first-hand. “I’m thrilled at the success we’re seeing with the adoption of plant-based beef, poultry and dairy, but there’s been too little focus on the need to stop the crisis in our oceans.
 
Over 90% of species live in the oceans and over 90% of carbon is stored in the oceans. Destroying our aquatic ecosystems is catastrophic. With an estimated 50 billion aquatic animals killed for food in the US every year, which is five times as much as all land animals combined, I want to be a part of saving those species, as well as saving our own species.
 

Michelle Wolf to launch New Wave Foods, which has been developing plant-based shrimp alternatives, in both a raw and crispy breaded format, since 2015.

 

The female-led company, which is based in San Francisco, is taking a similar approach to Ocean Hugger in focusing initially on placing its algae-based products with food service providers and restaurants. Chefs at Google’s cafeteria have already placed an order and the products are the first plant- and algae-based items to be served at the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s café as part of its Seafood Watchsustainability initiative. “Two thirds of seafood is consumed outside the home, so it made sense to go where the fish are,” says Barnes. “Our goal is impact, and food service is positioned to be the place where we can have the biggest impact. Whenever the general word ‘shrimp’ comes up in anycontext, thats the conversation we’re trying to be a part of.”

 
 
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42 minutes ago, LoreD said:

Vegan Seafood Is About To Become Big Business

 

Keeping my fingers crossed.

 

42 minutes ago, LoreD said:

And Not A Moment Too Soon

 

The world's oceans need it desperately

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Burger giant, McDonald's, long a holdout in the plant-based, imitation burger market, is finally dipping it's toe in the water.

https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/26/investing/beyond-meat-stock-mcdonalds-canada/index.htm

Quote

Beyond Meat stock soars on McDonald's deal

 

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On 9/23/2019 at 12:33 PM, LoreD said:

 

There are a lot of recipes out there for making fantastic vegan cheeses out of nuts and other vegan ingredients. A friend made some vegan cheese which she baked with vegan enchilada 

and it was unbelievably awesome as well as nutritious. 

https://minimalistbaker.com/5-minute-macadamia-cheese-vegan-crudite/

 

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5 hours ago, TheOldBarn said:

There are a lot of recipes out there for making fantastic vegan cheeses out of nuts and other vegan ingredients. A friend made some vegan cheese which she baked with vegan enchilada 

and it was unbelievably awesome as well as nutritious. 

https://minimalistbaker.com/5-minute-macadamia-cheese-vegan-crudite/

 

 

Looks tasty.

 

Thanks!

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Large numbers of them environmentally concerned Germans are switching to plant-based imitation meat.  The demand is so great that supply can't keep up.

 

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/beyond-meat-is-learning-a-big-lesson-in-germany-150720368.html

Quote

BERLIN - “Vegan hype from the USA,” shouted a May press release from a prominent German discount supermarket. “The Beyond Meat burger is now exclusively at Lidl.”

The fake meat burger sold out mere hours after its debut in Lidl’s 3,200 German stores in late May, sending customers into a frenzy — and sending Beyond Meat’s stock (BYND) up almost 7%.

<snip>

After Lidl’s brief supply was sold out in minutes in May, the community section of the company’s Facebook page was filled with hangry vegans posting in a mix of anger and desperation. Wholesaler Metro had a sizable stock in Costco-like quantities and subtweeted Lidl. A few weeks later, Netto, another discount grocery chain, began proudly offering the Beyond Meat “hype-burger” as a special. Of course, it sold out there, too.

<snip>
 
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  • 1 month later...

The popularity of plant-based, imitation meat seems to be taking off.  Great news for the biosphere.

 

https://www.thrillist.com/news/nation/burger-king-new-impossible-burgers-november-2019

Quote

 

Burger King Is Making 3 New Meat-Less Burgers to Follow the Impossible Whopper

Published On 11/11/2019
burger king impossible foods whopper new cheeseburger jr
Courtesy of Burger King

 

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tiny farmers, moved to Montana riding a tiny horse.

their aim, was to exploit, in the extreme, whatever it was,

that people might, utilize, in a sustainable way

 

oh man, I was there. He was so cool. 

When I was just a young guy. That's when I turned into a vegetarian. 

The farm is a tangle. A factory, a vehicle, a place to market.

A place to leave a space. I guess it would start with an economic

understanding of this world. And maybe with some expertise in

botany, I do suppose we might delve into this microbiome / Bio-IT.

http://www.bio-itworld.com/

 

maybe now, just might maybe be, did he/she leave a space 

to organically plant, I think it was selection number two, 

I don't remember now, it was so long ago...

 

 

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  • 2 months later...

I'll be heading over for my $3 Impossible Burger tomorrow.

 

According to Bloomberg:

 

The Impossible Burger sandwich was recently added to the Burger King's  two-for-$6 discount menu on a temporary basis. That compares to the previous suggested price of $5.59 per sandwich.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The public is gaining access to many new vegan, meat substitutes.  One that has seen a big increase in popularity is Jackfruit.  In its unripened state, Jackfruit is ready to be converted to a meat substitute.  When it turns ripe, Jackfruit develops a fruity smell and becomes sweet.  It also packs a nutritional punch.

 

Quote

“It was about five years ago that the fruit started to really take off,” he says. “Vegetarians and vegans found out how this fruit could be used as a ‘

meat substitute

’ for pulled pork sandwiches and as a taco meat.”

Its flesh-like texture makes jackfruit pulp ideal as a meat alternative.

 

 
This is the fruit.  It can be as big as a cantaloupe or larger than a big watermelon.  Grown in the tropics, Jackfruit is the world's largest tree fruit.
Image result for jackfruit, images
 
 
 
 
And here is an example of how the fruit can be prepared a a meat substitute.

 

Image result for jackfruit, images

BBQ pulled (pork) Jackfruit sandwich.

 

 

jackfruit-FTR

Jackfruit, meat substitute, pulled pork soup dish

 

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Image result for jackfruit, images

How I pick and eat 40 pounds of Jackfruit.
 
 
Image result for jackfruit, images
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                             JackfruitTacos                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
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2 hours ago, bludog said:

The public is gaining access to many new vegan, meat substitutes.  One that has seen a big increase in popularity is Jackfruit.  In its unripened state, Jackfruit is ready to be converted to a meat substitute.

 

Sounds like with some garlic, salt, and cayenne it would be really tasty.

 

1 hour ago, bludog said:

Image result for jackfruit, images

How I pick and eat 40 pounds of Jackfruit.

 

I'm led to believe that the draw isn't the fruit. But I'm 63, and my testosterone has become a memory, so ... the fruit is looking awfully good.

 

Here's her video:

 

 

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