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Avoiding Meat & Dairy Is 'Single Biggest Way' To Reduce Your Impact On Earth

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More good news for our planet   ^   ^   ^

 

I have nothing against the folks who make their living from livestock or dairy.   Through no fault of their own, it turns out their products can increasingly be replaced with far less environmentally destructive alternatives, while delivering improved benefits to the public.

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Beyond Meat is developing a meatless substitute for bacon.

 

Bloomberg reported Wednesday that Beyond CEO Ethan Brown said its bacon product is improving as it moves through development but doesn’t yet have a launch date.

 

We say that we’re going to innovate any product in the meat case,” Beyond spokeswoman Allison Aronoff said.

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Aquafaba

 

I just purchased a digital Veggie Burger cookbook from Amazon.  It had really great newspaper reviews, and had been marked down during a promotion to $1.99.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Veggie-Burgers-Every-Which-Way-ebook/dp/B003Q6CU8U/ref=sr_1_3?crid=29W2VRRTHAAC5&keywords=lukas+volger&qid=1564115130&s=books&sprefix=Lukas%2Cstripbooks%2C231&sr=1-3

 

I looked at some of the recipes and they all included egg whites as a binder.  I Googled and it seems everyone is using aquafaba as an egg replacer.  Gordon Ramsey used it in a challenge recipe making aquafaba meringues.  

 

Aquafaba is the liquid that we throw out from a can of chickpeas.  Apparently, we are supposed to  be using it., instead of throwing it out. 

 

I have some chickpeas soaking overnight in the fridge.  I always threw out the cooking water, but I guess I will save it from now on.  They said I could freeze it, too.  I'll freeze it in ice cube trays, so it will be portioned.

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1 hour ago, LoreD said:

Beyond Meat is developing a meatless substitute for bacon.

 

Bloomberg reported Wednesday that Beyond CEO Ethan Brown said its bacon product is improving as it moves through development but doesn’t yet have a launch date.

 

We say that we’re going to innovate any product in the meat case,” Beyond spokeswoman Allison Aronoff said.

 

Wonderful news.  Pigs are among the most intelligent, self-aware creatures in the world.  I, for one, can't wait to sample this product since, as a vegetarian, it might allow me to eat virtual bacon again..

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/10/science/10angier.html

 

 

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On 7/25/2019 at 10:37 PM, bludog said:

 

Wonderful news.  Pigs are among the most intelligent, self-aware creatures in the world.  I, for one, can't wait to sample this product since, as a vegetarian, it might allow me to eat virtual bacon again..

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/10/science/10angier.html

 

 

Hope that the meat alternatives are good for you. Part of the problem with a lot of food is that it's overly processed and filled with stuff that's not good for you. Fat, and salt, and who knows what. We do need a better economy regarding nutrition as a whole. 

The amount of food waste is also alarming. 

The big issue with inequality and lack of jobs is due to lack of demand. Dealing with climate change could help counter that in a big way. And yes, it involves all aspects of life including the food we eat. 

Peace!

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Veggie burgers are slightly more healthy to eat than the genuine article, despite a high degree of processing.  So I'm guessing veggie bacon won't be any worse than the real thing, either. 

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/9685441/ns/health-diet_and_nutrition/t/best-kind-veggie-burger/

 

But when it comes to the environment, plant-based substitutes are the clear choice, by far:

Quote

The team discovered that the Beyond Burger generates 90% less greenhouse gas emissions, requires 46% less energy, and has 99% less impact on water scarcity and 93% less impact on land use than a quarter pound of U.S. beef. That means a 41-square-foot plot of land can produce just one beef burger for every 15 Beyond Burgers.

https://www.fastcompany.com/90241836/meatless-burgers-vs-beef-how-beyond-meats-environmental-impact-stacks-up

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49 minutes ago, bludog said:

Veggie burgers are slightly more healthy to eat than the genuine article, despite a high degree of processing.  So I'm guessing veggie bacon won't be any worse than the real thing, either. 

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/9685441/ns/health-diet_and_nutrition/t/best-kind-veggie-burger/

 

But when it comes to the environment, plant-based substitutes are the clear choice, by far:

https://www.fastcompany.com/90241836/meatless-burgers-vs-beef-how-beyond-meats-environmental-impact-stacks-up

I definitely agree. But again, we need to suss out waste and also calculate nutritional resources. At least I think we should. That's not to say we can't have ice cream on our cherry pie.

 

Peace!

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I watched an interesting documentary on 90% death rate from lethal diseases after the first meeting with Europeans.  Native Americans didn't have plagues for a reason:  No domesticated food animals.

 

It makes you question whether it is OK to have a 35,000 pig farm pooping into the environment.  I watched the trucks come to pick up manure from a dairy farm to spread on the fields.  This was an area dependent on wells for water.

 

It will be interesting to see whether the increase in plant based meats will mean a decrease in transmitted diseases.

 

Plagues come from animals.

 

Whooping cough comes from pigs, and does flu as well as from birds. Our friend the cow alone is responsible for measles, tuberculosis, and smallpox.

 

For the cow these diseases are no big deal -- like colds for us. But when cow germs get in humans thing things they do to make the cow a little sick, makes humans very sick. Deadly sick.

 

Germs jumping species like this is extraordinarily rare. That's why generations of humans can spend time around animals just fine. Being the patient zero of a new animal-to-human plague is winning a terrible lottery.

 

But a colonial-age city raises the odds: there used to be animals everywhere, horses, herds of livestock in the streets, open slaughterhouses, meat markets pre-refrigeration, and a river of literal human and animal excrement running through it all.

 

A more perfect environment for diseases to jump species could hardly be imagined.

 

So the deeper answer is that plagues come from animals, but so rarely you have to raise the odds and with many chances for infection and give the new-born plague a fertile environment to grow. The old world had the necessary pieces in abundance.

 

But, why was a city like London filled with sheep and pigs and cows and Tenochtitlan wasn't?

 

This brings us to the final level. (For this video anyway)

Some animals can be put to human use -- this is what domestication means, animals you can breed, not just hunt.

 

Forget a the moment the modern world: go back to 10,000BC when tribes of humans reached just about everywhere. If you were in one of these tribes what local animals could you capture, alive, and successfully pen to breed?

 

Maybe you're in North Dakota and thinking about catching a Buffalo: an unpredictable, violent tank on hooves, that can outrun you across the plains, leap over your head head and travels in herds thousands strong.

 

Oh, and you have no horses to help you -- because there are no horses on the continent. Horses live here -- and won't be brought over until, too late.

 

It's just you, a couple buddies, and stone-based tools. American Indians didn't fail to domesticate buffalo because they couldn't figure it out. They failed because it's a buffalo. No one could do it -- buffalo would have been amazing creature to put to human work back in BC, but it's not going to happen -- humans have only barely domesticated buffalo with all our modern tools.

 

The New World didn't have good animal candidates for domestication. Almost everything big enough to be useful is also was to too dangerous, or too agile.

 

Meanwhile the fertile crescent to central Europe had: cows and and pigs and sheep and goats, easy animals comparatively begging to be domesticated.

 

A wild boar is something to contend with if you only have stone tools but it's possible to catch and pen and bread and feed to eat -- because pigs can't leap to the sky or crush all resistance beneath their hooves.

In The New World the only native domestication contestant was: llamas. They're better than nothing, which is probably why the biggest cities existed in South America -- but they're no cow. Ever try to manage a heard of llamas in the mountains of Peru? Yeah, you can do it, but it's not fun. Nothing but drama, these llamas.

 

These might seem, cherry-picked examples, because aren't there hundreds of thousands of species of animals? Yes, but when you're stuck at the bottom of the tech tree almost none of them can be domesticated. From the dawn of man until this fateful meeting humans domesticated maybe a baker's dozen of unique species the world over, and even to get that high a number you need to stretch it to include honeybees and silkworms. Nice to have, but you can't build a civilization on a foundation of honey alone.

 

These early tribes weren't smarter, or better at domestication. The old world had more valuable and easy animals. With dogs, herding sheep and cattle is easier. Now humans have a buddy to keep an eye on the clothing factory, and the milk and cheeseburger machine, and the plow-puller. Now farming is easier, which means there's more benefit to staying put, which means more domestication, which means more food which means more people and more density and oh look where we're going. Citiesville, population lots, bring your animals, plagues welcome.

 

That is the full answer: The lack of new world animals to domesticate, limited not only exposure to germs sources but also limited food production, which limited population growth, which limited cities, which made plagues in The New World an almost impossibility. In the old, exactly the reverse. And thus a continent full of plague and a continent devoid of it.

 

So when ships landed in the new world there was no Americapox to bring back.

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On 6/3/2018 at 1:25 PM, Craig234 said:


I think liberals need to not claim the issue is the 'extinction' of the human race - I think it's far more likely that the effects will be the killing and misery of MUCH of the human race, but that the wealthy will not be going extinct. I think it's far more likely for a lot of people to be killed than for all people to be killed.

 

Claiming the issue is extinction actually has a bit of a perverse political problem in that people are more likely to think, 'well the wealthy aren't going to kill themselves off, so we don't need to worry that much about extinction' - whereas they can understand a lot better than the wealthy will kill off a lot of people who aren't.

 

Even if extinction is a possibility, it seems more effective to talk about the lesser stage before that of mass killing and misery. But as that happens and te population shrinks, I expect things would stabilize and the remaining people could consider it a great success - a bit like how the wealthy came out way ahead from the Great Recession.

https://www.post-gazette.com/news/health/2018/07/10/polio-vaccine-Jonas-Salk-Jonathan-Sigmoid-curve-New-Reality-climate-change-Pittsburgh/stories/201807100002

 

I think a myriad of great posts have been offered up in this thread. 

Laripu has raised some salient truths regarding the US and its historic issues with food choices.

A lot of it does have to do with our own history, what's for dinner - beef / turkey for thanksgiving meal, the grits and the best way to cook the grits, with pork fat, etc etc etc...

And yes, food corporations have a big time responsibility in all of this.

Everything is corn based - oil/and fossil fuel based - it's true.

If you ever drove down highway 5 from San Fran to LA, I'm sure you've noticed the smell when you go past. Why it's Harris Ranges feed lot. Harris is the biggest beef producer

on the West Coast, it produces 150,000,000 pounds of beef or more per year . You are driving down highway 5 and you go by the feed lots, and brownish black mud with literally thousands of full grown cattle feeding on the troughs - all corn fed. And even if you are driving in a really great airtight expensive car with full blown air conditioning on a hot day, you cannot escape the stench.

It's more than kind of sad to see all these cows all stuck in this stench of their own making. 

When I was a kid I was mentored in Michigan. I learned about cows from a Veterinarian who explained how treating cows with dysentery (scours) is an expensive endeavor - this was back in the 1970's. It's a big industry, has been big going way way back in the US.

And yes, it has its lobbying arm. Yes, it's gone a long long way since Upton Sinclair wrote the novel, The Jungle, about the meat packing industry in Chicago which was first published in 1906. Most of the meat folks eat is perfectly safe these days. However it does incur an extravagant cost.

I say, don't mandate vegetarianism, instead, mandate the way cattle, turkey and chickens are raised. Make it so they can roam freely upon the land, and this would entail a more costlier price, which would in turn be beneficial to the health of all concerned. And incidentally, also be much more sustainable for generations to come.

 

Peace!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The UN has done a study which concludes that to avoid the more catastrophic effects of global warming, we must reduce the amount of farmland and increase areas of forest and natural vegetation.  To this, we will have to phase out livestock production in favor of plant and plant-based foods.  Even the feeding of penned livestock requires five times more land for cultivation than food crops for people.

 

"Livestock is the world's largest user of land resources, with pasture and arable land dedicated to the production of feed representing almost 80% of the total agricultural land. One-third of global arable land is used to grow feed, while 26% of the Earth's ice-free terrestrial surface is used for grazing."

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2019/08/08/748416223/to-slow-global-warming-u-n-warns-agriculture-must-change

Quote

To Slow Global Warming, U.N. Warns Agriculture Must Change

<snip>

the panel broadly suggested that farmland would need to shrink and forests would need to grow to keep Earth from getting more than 1.5 degrees Celsius hotter than it was in the preindustrial era. Global temperatures have already risen about 1 degree Celsius in the past 150 years.

To meet that temperature target, global greenhouse gas emissions will need to fall by 40% to 50% in the next decade. Scientists say the only way to achieve that reduction is to significantly increase the amount of land that's covered in trees and other vegetation and significantly reduce the amount of methane and other greenhouse gases that come from raising livestock such as cows, sheep and goats.

<snip>

The new report adds weight and detail to a warning put out by the same panel of scientists last fall, in which they sounded the alarm about the inadequacy of the pledges countries have made so far to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

<snip>

 

 

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On 8/8/2019 at 10:48 AM, bludog said:

The UN has done a study which concludes that to avoid the more catastrophic effects of global warming, we must reduce the amount of farmland and increase areas of forest and natural vegetation.  To this, we will have to phase out livestock production in favor of plant and plant-based foods.  Even the feeding of penned livestock requires five times more land for cultivation than food crops for people.

 

"Livestock is the world's largest user of land resources, with pasture and arable land dedicated to the production of feed representing almost 80% of the total agricultural land. One-third of global arable land is used to grow feed, while 26% of the Earth's ice-free terrestrial surface is used for grazing."

 

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2019/08/08/748416223/to-slow-global-warming-u-n-warns-agriculture-must-change

 

we have indeed over saturated the lands with livestock. You need to feed the livestock, and industry has cleverly developed ways to mass produce it. But the cost is way too high to the environment, and it is in no way sustainable.  I like the idea of changing the story and Beyond Meat has made a great move. However, we do need to talk about food with a multifaceted approach. 

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/impossible-burger

 

Peace!

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On 8/10/2019 at 10:04 PM, TheOldBarn said:

However, we do need to talk about food with a multifaceted approach. 

 

Here's another facet.  Unlike most plant protein, algae contains all the essential amino acids.  The quality of its protein rivals egg or whey.   One of the best things about algae is it can be grown in water from saline aquifers.

 

=================================================================================================================

 

                       sponsored this story

Acres of saltwater pools in the desert are growing an algae food revolution

 

 

 

High in protein and low in carbon footprint, algae is a breakthrough for feeding the world in a changing climate

Screen%20Shot%202018-12-13%20at%205.51.1

Bahar Gholipour  -  Science Journalist  - 

<snip>

We will soon be running out of food. The projected population of the world in 2050 will require a 70 percent increase in food production, but we are already stretching our resources with the way we grow food today, a new United Nations report warned yesterday. Land is turning into desert, rising temperatures are cutting crop yields, and soil is becoming lifeless due to overuse. Seventy percent of the world’s available freshwater is used for agriculture and raising livestock. Livestock and the food they consume generate 14 percent of all greenhouse gas emissions from human-related activity, contributing to climate change, more droughts and land erosions. It’s a vicious cycle that experts say we are running out of time to break. “We need a farming revolution,” says Miguel Calatayud, the CEO of iWi. 

<snip>

https://massivesci.com/articles/iwi-algae-protein-nannochloropsis-food-essential-amino-acids/?utm_source=pocket-newtab

 

 

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On 8/10/2019 at 10:04 PM, TheOldBarn said:

we do need to talk about food with a multifaceted approach. 

 

Another potential source of environmentally friendly sustenance are insects.  We, in the First World nations have dispensed with a source of nutrients that could be the solution to the future of our food supply, just so long as we are able to let go of our aversion to eating bugs.  


https://www.bbvaopenmind.com/en/science/environment/insects-the-food-of-the-future/

Quote

 

<snip>

Before the middle of this century, the Earth will have more than nine billion human mouths to feed, and it is not clear that food production can grow at the same pace. According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), 26% of the world’s dry land is devoted to pasture for livestock, and 33% of arable land produces crops for livestock. This activity is responsible for 18% of greenhouse gas emissions, and converting more forestland to open spaces for agriculture would increase the problem of climate change.

<snip>

Edible Insects: Nutritional Ingredients are Moving Beyond Traditional Offerings

Just as consumption of raw fish in the form of sushi has become increasingly popular, so could eating insects.

 

We already have a taste for them as evidenced by our attraction to crunchy, insect sized snacks like Cheetos.  And breakfast cereals like:

 

Image result for breakfast cereal in the shape of insects
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

As well as the real thing:

Image result for breakfast cereal in the shape of insects

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On 8/10/2019 at 10:04 PM, TheOldBarn said:

we do need to talk about food with a multifaceted approach. 

 

There is no one solution.   But growing crops in vertically stacked layers is one of the contenders.

 

And the problem of feeding the world's growing population is inextricably connected to the problem of how to slow climate change.  "According to the United Nations, world population growth is currently running at 83 million people a year - meaning there will be more than a billion more people to feed in just 13 years."

 

Food and population statistics

=================================================================================================================

 

Growing crops on the land is not the only way to yield produce.  Food can be grown in vertically stacked layers, in buildings.  This would save enormously on agricultural land use, which could then be converted back to CO2 absorbing forests.  Phillips Electronics has developed banks of LED bulbs specifically for the purpose of producing cheap lighting to replace sunlight for crops.  Crops grown in vertically stacked layers can produce produce the year round.  And be much more productive due to receiving light, 24 hrs a day.  Hydroponics are an ideal method to grow this way. 

 

These vertically stacked, "city farms" can be much closer to where the food is consumed, saving greatly on emissions from transportation.

 

===================================================================================================================

 

Similarly, producing fake meat from plant matter is not the only way to produce imitation meat.   A 2015 startup,  Memphis Meats is growing meat in their facilities, bypassing livestock altogether.

Quote

We make food by sourcing high-quality cells from animals and cultivating them into meat — think of a farm at a tiny scale. We cut some steps from the current process (like raising and processing animals) and bring nutritious, tasty meat to your table.

In 2018, agricultural giant, Tyson Foods invested in Memphis Meats.  Unlike faux, plant based meat, vat grown muscle tissue is indistinguishable form the real thing.  It will be on the market, competing with plant based meat substitutes, soon.

https://www.memphismeats.com/

https://www.raconteur.net/sustainability/christiana-figueres-food-production

 

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On 8/10/2019 at 10:04 PM, TheOldBarn said:

we do need to talk about food with a multifaceted approach. 

 

Reducing the Amount of Wasted Food:

 

Another way to feed a growing world population while preserving the environment and reducing harmful emission, is simply to throw away less food.  It has been show that a full 25% of all food is never consumed.  The problem exists throughout the food-production chain.  From growing and shipping to end-consumers like restaurants and households.  In the United States, nearly 50% of all food is thrown in the garbage.

 

Unsold food from supermarkets is usually thrown away.  It is a worldwide problem.  Some countries like France has made a laws that this food must be donated to charities.  Households can cut down on waste by eating leftovers and not preparing more than they need.

 

Restaurants throw away many tons of uneaten food daily.  Although restaurants are protected against civil and criminal liability as a result of consuming donated food, most restaurants simply throw out wasted food. 

 

"The environmental impact of food loss and waste is high. The carbon footprint of food produced and not eaten is estimated at 3.3 gigatonnes of CO2, meaning that if food waste were a country it would rank as the third highest national emitter of greenhouse gases after the US and China."

 

To cut down on the amount of worldwide food waste, we need international cooperation and laws.  People need to be made aware of the seriousness of the of food waste problem.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2015/aug/12/cutting-food-waste-enough-for-everyone-says-un

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/what-do-restaurants-do-wi_b_5469841

https://www.livescience.com/41301-way-to-feed-11-billion-people.html

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On 8/10/2019 at 10:04 PM, TheOldBarn said:

we do need to talk about food with a multifaceted approach. 

 

Aquaponics:

Yet another approach to reducing agricultural pollution and harmful gaseous emissions while increasing food production for a growing world population.

 

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/aquaponics-fish-poop-food_l_5c48b7e3e4b025aa26bf6f82

Quote

<snip>

Aquaponics is a sustainable method of farming that combines aquaculture (raising fish) and hydroponics (cultivating plants in water). In a recirculating system, fish waste and bacteria provide nutrients to growing plants. The water from fish is thoroughly filtered and only comes in contact with the roots, minimizing the potential for contamination. Plants then take up those nutrients and return clean water to the fish.

<snip>

Aquaponics is helping farmers figure out how to feed a world population expected to reach nearly 10 billion by 2050.

<snip>

Today, surrounded by freezing temperatures, thousands of heads of lettuce grow, nestled in a cozy greenhouse fed by nutrient-rich nitrates. Or you could call it what it is: fish poop.

The process, called aquaponics, allows farmers to grow local, organic produce anywhere at any time of year.

<snip>

 

The leafy greens shown here, at&nbsp;the Ecolife Innovation Center in northern San Diego County, are grown using aquaponics.

 

 

 

 

 

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But first and foremost, the entire world population must be weaned from meat and become vegetarian.  Livestock is the biggest cause of profligate land use. 

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On 8/10/2019 at 10:04 PM, TheOldBarn said:

we do need to talk about food with a multifaceted approach. 

 

Increase crop production in places where it is low. 

According to Jason Clay, an expert in natural resources management at the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), " the best producers in the world of a crop are 100 times better than the worst."  Many farmers in third world countries have not yet benefited from plant breeding techniques which could improve food production.  Also highly beneficial are modern practices of crop rotation and matching crops to the climate and soil, for optimum output while preserving good conservation of the land.

 

Implementing beneficial agricultural programs on a country-by-country bases is not enough.  In order to make significant strides in fighting climate change, the United Nations needs to be given sufficient power, control and funds to do more research and bring about beneficial agricultural changes, worldwide. 

 

We are already late in fighting climate change and currently it is estimated that 815 million people worldwide, go hungry daily.  The problems of climate change and feeding a rapidly increasing world population need to be addressed simultaneously.

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