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rippy38

Anybody make their own beef jerky?

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If so, what cuts of beef to you find work best?

 

I have a London Broil sliced and marinating in my favorite hot teriyaki mix as I type.

 

Drying tomorrow! 

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Jerky cows?

 

Seriously, when you make jerky, you need to read up on meat preservation. Learn about curing salts, so you don't poison yourself.

 

And for fun:

 

1608144.jpg

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17 hours ago, laripu said:

Jerky cows?

 

Seriously, when you make jerky, you need to read up on meat preservation. Learn about curing salts, so you don't poison yourself.

 

And for fun:

 

1608144.jpg

 

I'll second that on the nitrates. I've been making my own jerky for years.

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3 hours ago, rippy38 said:

 

I'll second that on the nitrates. I've been making my own jerky for years.

 

I don't make jerky, but I do make fresh sausage, and freeze it. Mostly pork and chicken, but sometimes beef+ chicken. Because I freeze, I usually don't use nitrates or nitrites.

 

But I plan on eventually making pastrami; maybe even using pastrami technique on pork shoulder. I already have the necessary salts.

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1 hour ago, laripu said:

 

I don't make jerky, but I do make fresh sausage, and freeze it. Mostly pork and chicken, but sometimes beef+ chicken. Because I freeze, I usually don't use nitrates or nitrites.

 

But I plan on eventually making pastrami; maybe even using pastrami technique on pork shoulder. I already have the necessary salts.

The curing salt I use only has a trace amount of nitrate, and a little goes a long way in a wet marinade. I usually only use about a 1/4 teaspoon per lb of fresh meat, added to the other spices and liquid. Any more than that and it gets too salty. I dry @ 165 degrees for 3-4 hours and then give it a run in the oven @ 250 degrees for about 10 minutes immediately out of the dryer. I've been using this method for years and have had no issues. 

 

I love some good fresh homemade sausage too, but haven't attempted making any myself. 

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26 minutes ago, rippy38 said:

I love some good fresh homemade sausage too, but haven't attempted making any myself. 

 

Here are the secrets:

1. Meat with sufficient fat, at least 25%.

2. Salt, about 1.8% by weight. Light on all other spices. (Get a good little scale. Cheap, from China.)

3. The meat must be always just above freezing, then squish squish squish till it gets shiny and sticky. (Your fingers will hurt from the cold. Do it in stages, returning the meat to the freezer.) Shiny and sticky means it's sausage-ified.

4. Wash casings very thoroughly.

 

Explore this, it has everything you need to know, and then some:

https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausage-making

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11 minutes ago, laripu said:

 

Here are the secrets:

1. Meat with sufficient fat, at least 25%.

2. Salt, about 1.8% by weight. Light on all other spices. (Get a good little scale. Cheap, from China.)

3. The meat must be always just above freezing, then squish squish squish till it gets shiny and sticky. (Your fingers will hurt from the cold. Do it in stages, returning the meat to the freezer.) Shiny and sticky means it's sausage-ified.

4. Wash casings very thoroughly.

 

Explore this, it has everything you need to know, and then some:

https://www.meatsandsausages.com/sausage-making

Thanks for the info. It doesn't sound too intimidating.

 

I'll probably have a harder time convincing my wife that I need room in the kitchen for a meat grinder and a casing stuffer, than I will trying my hand at sausage making.

 

lol

 

 

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54 minutes ago, rippy38 said:

I'll probably have a harder time convincing my wife that I need room in the kitchen for a meat grinder and a casing stuffer, than I will trying my hand at sausage making.

 

For your meat grinder, I use the attachment to my wife's kitchenaid mixer.

 

I did buy a stuffer. (Don't stuff sausage from the mixer attachment ... big mistake. I tried it once.) This is the stuffer I bought. It works well.

 

I store it with my homebrew stuff. No complaints from the spousal unit, and she likes my sausage. ;):D

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My ex makes jerky all the time my kids love it so do there friends. He uses hamburger 80/20 and spices he gets from Bass Pro shop. Sometimes he makes his own especially when he wants the jerky HOT.

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On 3/10/2018 at 8:48 PM, rippy38 said:

If so, what cuts of beef to you find work best?

 

I have a London Broil sliced and marinating in my favorite hot teriyaki mix as I type.

 

Drying tomorrow! 

I've made my own but haven't for a while now.   As I recall, I also used london broil with the teriyaki.    I love it.    No sausage or anything like that, though.

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On 3/12/2018 at 8:34 PM, rippy38 said:

The curing salt I use only has a trace amount of nitrate, and a little goes a long way in a wet marinade. I usually only use about a 1/4 teaspoon per lb of fresh meat, added to the other spices and liquid. Any more than that and it gets too salty. I dry @ 165 degrees for 3-4 hours and then give it a run in the oven @ 250 degrees for about 10 minutes immediately out of the dryer. I've been using this method for years and have had no issues. 

 

I love some good fresh homemade sausage too, but haven't attempted making any myself. 

Have you ever done a cost analysis of what it costs you versus buying the same amount retail?

 

Also. People who worry about nitrates are usually harmed by them. Nitrates are not harmful if you don't worry.

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On 9/19/2018 at 9:45 PM, HerkenMcJerkin said:

Have you ever done a cost analysis of what it costs you versus buying the same amount retail?

 

Also. People who worry about nitrates are usually harmed by them. Nitrates are not harmful if you don't worry.

I did it just to see how good I could make it and enjoyed doing it about 4 months.

 

"Nitrates are not harmful if you don't worry."     Funny.

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3 hours ago, Mindy09 said:

I did it just to see how good I could make it and enjoyed doing it about 4 months.

 

"Nitrates are not harmful if you don't worry."     Funny.

Food poisoning was a major cause of death 150 yrs ago. Nitrates are our friends. Sure some people are more sensitive than others, but the human liver, kidneys, and sweat glands are amazing at ridding us of those things.

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1 hour ago, HerkenMcJerkin said:

Food poisoning was a major cause of death 150 yrs ago. Nitrates are our friends. Sure some people are more sensitive than others, but the human liver, kidneys, and sweat glands are amazing at ridding us of those things.

Good to know!    Thank you.

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There are commercial cured meats that claim they don't add any nitrates or nitrites. Look at the ingredients and you'll see celery juice: a source of the same curing agents.

 

This, from McGill University, should answer all questions:

https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/food/celery-juice-viable-alternative-nitrites-cured-meats

 

The summary: when nitrites are directly added, regulations about how much should be added 1) make the meat safe and 2) diminish the quantity of carcinogenic nitrosamines to safe levels. The are no such regulations for celery juice.

 

The bigger problems with cured meat are high levels of fat and salt. If you eat mostly fresh food, a bit of cured meat won't hurt you. I'm partial to pastrami and corned beef and the Montreal variant called "smoked meat". And salami. Just not every day. 

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14 hours ago, laripu said:

There are commercial cured meats that claim they don't add any nitrates or nitrites. Look at the ingredients and you'll see celery juice: a source of the same curing agents.

 

This, from McGill University, should answer all questions:

https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/food/celery-juice-viable-alternative-nitrites-cured-meats

 

The summary: when nitrites are directly added, regulations about how much should be added 1) make the meat safe and 2) diminish the quantity of carcinogenic nitrosamines to safe levels. The are no such regulations for celery juice.

 

The bigger problems with cured meat are high levels of fat and salt. If you eat mostly fresh food, a bit of cured meat won't hurt you. I'm partial to pastrami and corned beef and the Montreal variant called "smoked meat". And salami. Just not every day. 

But I love the taste of nitrates and refuse nitrate free.

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10 hours ago, HerkenMcJerkin said:

But I love the taste of nitrates and refuse nitrate free.

 

I love the taste of garlic. Garlic, onions chile peppers, yum.

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9 hours ago, laripu said:

 

I love the taste of garlic. Garlic, onions chile peppers, yum.

Those are better than nitrates. Lol

 

My dad grew up on a farm. He said his old man made the best pork, chicken, and beef jerkey

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17 minutes ago, HerkenMcJerkin said:

He said his old man made the best pork, chicken, and beef jerkey

 

Food preservation techniques were very important in the past because people were poor and food wasn't always plentiful. 

 

Now, these techniques are still important for taste,  and culture.  Many foods and drinks are examples of that:

 

Beer, wine,  whiskey and other distilled beverages, cheese, yogurt, pickles, kimchi, fermented sausages, cured meats of all kinds ... these are all examples of ways our ancestors tried to stave off starvation. They left us ... culture.

 

Thank you, ancestors.

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2 minutes ago, laripu said:

 

Food preservation techniques were very important in the past because people were poor and food wasn't always plentiful. 

 

Now, these techniques are still important for taste,  and culture.  Many foods and drinks are examples of that:

 

Beer, wine,  whiskey and other distilled beverages, cheese, yogurt, pickles, kimchi, fermented sausages, cured meats of all kinds ... these are all examples of ways our ancestors tried to stave off starvation. They left us ... culture.

 

Thank you, ancestors.

His old man made everything. My dad said his beer was kick A. Lol

 

One thing about growing up on a productive farm during the Depression, You ate well.

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2 hours ago, HerkenMcJerkin said:

His old man made everything. My dad said his beer was kick A. Lol

 

One thing about growing up on a productive farm during the Depression, You ate well.

 

I've been making beer for 28 years. And mead. Occasionally cider.

 

Growing up on a farm, your dad was really lucky for that time. Mine was a refugee during WWII, and ate well because he walked hundreds of miles east to escape the front, and when the farmers found out what his trade was, they fed and sheltered him. He was a shoemaker. He repaired all their shoes and boots, ate well, and moved on. He ended up in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.

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