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Sunken Slave Ship Discovered Off Alabama Coast Was Likely Last to Bring Africans to U.S. Against Their Will


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The last slave ship that brought slaves to the U.S. may have been discovered by a local reporter, buried in the muddy shoreline north of Mobile, Alabama. The Clotilda, as the ship is known, was the last U.S. slave ship that brought humans from West Africa in 1859. It was thought to be long lost—until now. 

Ben Raines, reporter for AL.com, searched the shorelines where Russell Ladd told him the location that his father once said was where the Clotilda was located. Ladd told Raines that when he was a kid, he and his father "used to go up the Mobile River to fish various places." "On low tide, we’d see this burned-out ship and my father and his friends would say, 'There’s the Clotilda,'" Ladd said. 

RTR2C2T7The Schooner, "Amistad", (Friendship) flies the U.S. flag and the Cuban flag as it approaches Havana Harbor March 25, 2010. The Schooner is a replica of the 19th century slave revolt Cuban slave ship that carried Africans and became an icon of the abolitionist movement. Reuters/Desmond Boylan

 

That thread of oral history led to a visual review by maritime archaeologists from the University of West Florida, who say the preliminary evidence is promising. The ship would have been around 100 feet long on the deck, according to John Bratten, the chair of the anthropology department at the university. When Bratten, Cook, a group of their students and Raines looked at the ship's remains peeking from the mud, it was a cold, but beautiful day in Alabama. There were eagles and ospreys flying—a pretty area to work in, according to Bratten. But, Bratten told Newsweek that he "felt different on this ship than I have on other ones over the years."

"You start thinking, 'How many people were placed aboard this?'" he told Newsweek.  

In its time, the Clotilda transported 110 slaves from what is modern-day Benin in West Africa. The ship's captain, William Foster, and a plantation owner, Timothy Meaher, then burned the ship to cover the evidence of human trafficking, evidence which would have included “the partitions, the platforms, the empty casks of food and water, the big pots, the tubs, the blood, the vomit, the spit, the mucus, the urine, and the feces that soiled the planks, the awful smell that always floated around slave ships,” as reported by AL.com, citing the historian Sylviane A. Diouf, who wrote the 2007 book Dreams of Africa in Alabama.

 

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And just as the ship's captain, Foster, detailed in his journal, the remains found on the muddy banks of Alabama also had evidence of being burned. Raines' report noted the location also lines up with Foster's account too. Other examples of evidence that this ship is the Clotilda were the ship's rigging and iron fasteners, which revealed that it likely once transported lumber to the Caribbean before being involved in the Atlantic slave trade, similar to the known history of the Clotilda. The wreck appears to date back to the mid-1800s, which would align with when the Clotilda was built, according to the team from the University of West Florida. A full excavation to confirm whether this specific ship is the Clotilda would require permits and extensive funding to dig the ship out of the mud.

But, "a lot of things are lining up," Greg Cook, maritime archaeologist from the University of West Florida who conducted a visual review of the ship, told Newsweek. "We didn't see anything that screams that this could not be the Clotilda, but we're not ready to claim that it is, either, without more research." 

 

Shipwrecks along the coastlines and in the bays of the U.S. are not as uncommon as you'd expect. There are sunken ships from the mid-1500s in Pensacola Bay and abandoned ships from hundreds of years past found relatively frequently.

"That's why we're being cautious," Cook told Newsweek. "These things are not uncommon, and so we have to kind of do a little detective work." 

This article was first written by Newsweek

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1 minute ago, 123urout said:

you owes me stuff

Obama-Veto-in-the-Choom-Gang.jpg

which  red state y'all  hale from cletus? I want to run some numbers to see if y'all are a bunch of mooches like I suspect. if you are too ashamed of your mooching I will understand.

but if you are ashamed please refrain from calling others takers as jesus doesn't like liars and god hates a hypocrite.

 

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7 minutes ago, benson13 said:

article-2080110-0F4BFAA700000578-978_634x369.jpg

 

Yeah, EVERYONE knows that this is due to DEMOCRATS being IN CHARGE.

 

Then REPUBLICANS became IN CHARGE and ALL OF THAT SLAVERY that YOU DEMOCRATS SUPPORTED got ended.

 

And that, my dear, is the FACTUAL TRUTH that you seem to avoid like the plague.

 

ROFLMAO!!!!

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“Sir, the great question which is now uprooting this Government to its foundation---the great question which underlies all our deliberations here, is the question of African slavery." -- Thomas F. Goode, Virginia Secession Convention

 

“The question of Slavery is the rock upon which the Old Government split: it is the cause of secession.” — G. T. Yelverton, Alabama Secession Convention

 

...increasing hostility on the part of the non-slaveholding States to the Institution of Slavery ... — Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina (December, 1860)

 

“The area of slavery must be extended correlative with its antagonism, or it will be put speedily in the 'course of ultimate extinction.'... The extension of slavery is the vital point of the whole controversy between the North and the South...” — Henry M. Rector, Governor of Arkansas, Arkansas Secession Convention

 

“We hold as undeniable truths that the governments of the various States, and of the confederacy itself, were established exclusively by the white race, for themselves and their posterity; that the African race had no agency in their establishment; that they were rightfully held and regarded as an inferior and dependent race, and in that condition only could their existence in this country be rendered beneficial or tolerable.” —  A Declaration of the Causes which Impel the State of Texas to Secede from the Federal Union (February 1861)

 

“With the social balance wheel of slavery to regulate its machinery, we may fondly indulge the hope that our Southern government will be perpetual... Louisiana looks to the formation of a Southern confederacy to preserve the blessings of African slavery...” — George Williamson, Louisiana State Commissioner, to the Texan secession convention

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10 minutes ago, benson13 said:

“Sir, the great question which is now uprooting this Government to its foundation---the great question which underlies all our deliberations here, is the question of African slavery." -- Thomas F. Goode, Virginia Secession Convention

 

“The question of Slavery is the rock upon which the Old Government split: it is the cause of secession.” — G. T. Yelverton, Alabama Secession Convention

 

...increasing hostility on the part of the non-slaveholding States to the Institution of Slavery ... — Declaration of the Immediate Causes Which Induce and Justify the Secession of South Carolina (December, 1860)

 

“The area of slavery must be extended correlative with its antagonism, or it will be put speedily in the 'course of ultimate extinction.'... The extension of slavery is the vital point of the whole controversy between the North and the South...” — Henry M. Rector, Governor of Arkansas, Arkansas Secession Convention

 

“We hold as undeniable truths that the governments of the various States, and of the confederacy itself, were established exclusively by the white race, for themselves and their posterity; that the African race had no agency in their establishment; that they were rightfully held and regarded as an inferior and dependent race, and in that condition only could their existence in this country be rendered beneficial or tolerable.” —  A Declaration of the Causes which Impel the State of Texas to Secede from the Federal Union (February 1861)

 

“With the social balance wheel of slavery to regulate its machinery, we may fondly indulge the hope that our Southern government will be perpetual... Louisiana looks to the formation of a Southern confederacy to preserve the blessings of African slavery...” — George Williamson, Louisiana State Commissioner, to the Texan secession convention

You seem to be VERY proud of your DEMOCRAT HERITAGE there shi'tstain!!!!

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