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War over free speech on campus


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A war of words on college campuses
 
A war of words is raging on many a college campus ... a debate in which the right of free speech itself is under fire.
Our Cover Story is reported by Rita Braver:
 
In the 1960s college students demanded the right to talk about anything on campus, from civil rights to opposing the Vietnam War. All ideas seemed up for debate. But is that still true today? At Yale University in Connecticut, a faculty member is yelled at by students. The reason? His wife (also a Yale instructor) had suggested students should be free to wear any Halloween costume they choose, even if slightly offensive. A month later, the teacher resigns.
 
At the University of Missouri, students and faculty try to stop a student reporter from covering their protest. "This is a First Amendment that protects your right to stand here, and protects mine!" the photographer said.
 
And at the University of California at Berkeley, when conservative commentator Ben Shapiro showed up to speak, there were multiple arrests. The school was on virtual lockdown, and more than half a million dollars was spent on security.

Even comedian Bill Maher faced student calls to cancel his Berkeley commencement address in part because he'd made jokes about Islam.
"Whoever told you, you only had to hear what didn't upset you?" Maher quipped.
 
But at campuses around the country, some speakers were dis-invited, or simply backed out in the face of student opposition, such as former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, head of the International Monetary Fund Christine Lagarde, and the rapper and actor Common.
It's got a lot of people asking, what is going on?
 
In September 2015, speaking to young people in Des Moines, Iowa, President Barack Obama said, "I've heard some college campuses where they don't want to have a guest speaker who, you know, is too conservative. Or they don't want to read a book if it has language that is offensive to African Americans. Or somehow sends a demeaning signal towards women … I don't agree with that, that you as students at colleges have to be coddled and protected from different points of view."
 
And if you visit a campus these days, you may feel like you need a dictionary for a whole new set of phrases … terms like "safe space" (a place where students can go where they won't be exposed to topics that make them uncomfortable), or "trigger warnings" (when a professor cautions students that upcoming material could be distressing).
But now, some signs of a backlash.
 
Robert Zimmer, president of the University of Chicago, told Braver, "Discomfort is an intrinsic part of an education."
Last school year, the university sent a letter to incoming freshman that said, in part:
"[W]e do not support so-called 'trigger warnings,' we do not cancel invited speakers because their topics might prove controversial, and we do not condone the creation of intellectual 'safe spaces' where individuals can retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds with their own…"
 
Braver asked, "Why did the university have to put out a letter like that in the first place?"
 
"Part of the way we operate is that we're a place where there's constant open discourse, constant expression and constant argument," Zimmer replied.
But the war of words is continuing on college campuses across the country, including Middlebury, where students like Liz Dunn and Rae Aaron say the impact of the Charles Murray incident is still being felt.
 
"In the end, I think the conversation turned into whether or not we support controversial ideas," Aaron said. "And, for me, it's hands down, of course we do. It doesn't matter how much we disagree with them."
 
 
And this is what the left wants for America, communism for the SNOWFLAKES!

 

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3 minutes ago, TBHWT said:
A war of words on college campuses
 
A war of words is raging on many a college campus ... a debate in which the right of free speech itself is under fire.
Our Cover Story is reported by Rita Braver:
 
In the 1960s college students demanded the right to talk about anything on campus, from civil rights to opposing the Vietnam War. All ideas seemed up for debate. But is that still true today? At Yale University in Connecticut, a faculty member is yelled at by students. The reason? His wife (also a Yale instructor) had suggested students should be free to wear any Halloween costume they choose, even if slightly offensive. A month later, the teacher resigns.
 
At the University of Missouri, students and faculty try to stop a student reporter from covering their protest. "This is a First Amendment that protects your right to stand here, and protects mine!" the photographer said.
 
And at the University of California at Berkeley, when conservative commentator Ben Shapiro showed up to speak, there were multiple arrests. The school was on virtual lockdown, and more than half a million dollars was spent on security.

Even comedian Bill Maher faced student calls to cancel his Berkeley commencement address in part because he'd made jokes about Islam.
"Whoever told you, you only had to hear what didn't upset you?" Maher quipped.
 
But at campuses around the country, some speakers were dis-invited, or simply backed out in the face of student opposition, such as former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, head of the International Monetary Fund Christine Lagarde, and the rapper and actor Common.
It's got a lot of people asking, what is going on?
 
In September 2015, speaking to young people in Des Moines, Iowa, President Barack Obama said, "I've heard some college campuses where they don't want to have a guest speaker who, you know, is too conservative. Or they don't want to read a book if it has language that is offensive to African Americans. Or somehow sends a demeaning signal towards women … I don't agree with that, that you as students at colleges have to be coddled and protected from different points of view."
 
And if you visit a campus these days, you may feel like you need a dictionary for a whole new set of phrases … terms like "safe space" (a place where students can go where they won't be exposed to topics that make them uncomfortable), or "trigger warnings" (when a professor cautions students that upcoming material could be distressing).
But now, some signs of a backlash.
 
Robert Zimmer, president of the University of Chicago, told Braver, "Discomfort is an intrinsic part of an education."
Last school year, the university sent a letter to incoming freshman that said, in part:
"[W]e do not support so-called 'trigger warnings,' we do not cancel invited speakers because their topics might prove controversial, and we do not condone the creation of intellectual 'safe spaces' where individuals can retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds with their own…"
 
Braver asked, "Why did the university have to put out a letter like that in the first place?"
 
"Part of the way we operate is that we're a place where there's constant open discourse, constant expression and constant argument," Zimmer replied.
But the war of words is continuing on college campuses across the country, including Middlebury, where students like Liz Dunn and Rae Aaron say the impact of the Charles Murray incident is still being felt.
 
"In the end, I think the conversation turned into whether or not we support controversial ideas," Aaron said. "And, for me, it's hands down, of course we do. It doesn't matter how much we disagree with them."
 
 
And this is what the left wants for America, communism for the SNOWFLAKES!
 
 
 
 

 

Talk it up. boys.  But do remember there is such a thing as private property here and if you can't stand on your soapbox there, because of their rules, take it to the public square.  That's the actual Free Speech zone.

 

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1 hour ago, Harryhands said:

Talk it up. boys.  But do remember there is such a thing as private property here and if you can't stand on your soapbox there, because of their rules, take it to the public square.  That's the actual Free Speech zone.

 

You seem to have a good point.  Are the college campuses that do not allow conservative talk, private?  Can you give me one private college that is really private and does not allow conservative discourse?

 

I will bet this:  If this behavior was happening on a conservative private college and they banned liberal speakers to their campus, you would be yelling high treason, get our lawyers and bring them up on charges and close down this college of traitors.  

 

But the lefty college has all the rights to do as they feel is good for their college.  I that how it goes?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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11 minutes ago, stephenmerkley said:

If this behavior was happening on a conservative private college and they banned liberal speakers to their campus, you would be yelling high treason,

Right- lots of leftists talking at Liberty University lol

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16 minutes ago, slideman said:

Right- lots of leftists talking at Liberty University lol

True, but they could if they wanted to.  But I believe a true lefty wacko would not put their foot on Liberty U, or they would be drawn and quartered as soon as they got off campus by other lefties so outraged that they would actually go into that depraved den of conservatives.

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1 minute ago, stephenmerkley said:

True, but they could if they wanted to.  But I believe a true lefty wacko would not put their foot on Liberty U, or they would be drawn and quartered as soon as they got off campus by other lefties so outraged that they would actually go into that depraved den of conservatives.

You have a distorted view of the left.

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Just now, slideman said:

You have a distorted view of the left.

No, I watched the video of the left in action as they threw the conservative off the stage and then proceeded to burn part of the campus down.  Some even wore ninja outfits to conceal their identities.  I saw them attack trump attendees at his rallies.  They may only represent a % of the left, but it is damaging your whole image as reasonable, rational people.  This same unreasonable attitude is manifesting itself in the senate right now, as schumer has engineered a shutdown of the government because the left want 1 million daca voters given legal status in return for nothing, free and clear of any compromise on their part.  Good going lefties, I believe it will stop them in the 2018 elections again.

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1 hour ago, stephenmerkley said:

You seem to have a good point.  Are the college campuses that do not allow conservative talk, private?  Can you give me one private college that is really private and does not allow conservative discourse?

 

I will bet this:  If this behavior was happening on a conservative private college and they banned liberal speakers to their campus, you would be yelling high treason, get our lawyers and bring them up on charges and close down this college of traitors.  

 

But the lefty college has all the rights to do as they feel is good for their college.  I that how it goes?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Did I stutter, dumass?  Private is private, public is public.  Clear now?

 

 

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