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How Canada's Gun Laws Compare With Ours


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By the Numbers: How Canada's Gun Laws Compare With Ours

Gun violence has become all too common in the U.S., but it made for a rare headline Wednesday when two shootings in Canada left a soldier and a gunman dead, The Globe and Mail reported.

The Ottawa shootings at the National War Memorial and inside Parliament shone a light on our northern neighbor’s laws, which have often been credited with helping Canada avoid the multitudes of mass shootings the U.S. has seen.

Annual homicides by gun:

  • Canada had 173 homicides by gun, according to a 2012 report.
  • The U.S. had 9,146 that year.

Total number of civilian guns:

  • Canada has 9,950,000.
  • The U.S. has more than 27 times as many: 270,000,000.

Guns per person:

  • Canada reports 30.8 firearms per 100 people. The country ranks 13 worldwide for firearms per capita, according to a report published by The Washington Post in September.
  • The U.S. has 88.8. It ranks No. 1.

Waiting period to purchase a gun:

  • Canada requires a 60-day waiting period.
  • There is no federally mandated waiting period in the U.S. Residents can receive a gun after a background check.

Largest mass shootings:

  • Canada’s largest mass shooting was in 1989, when 25-year-old Marc Lepine killed 14 people at Montreal's École Polytechnique.
  • The U.S. has had 160 mass shooting incidents between 2000 and 2013, CNN reports from a study released by the FBI. The largest U.S. shooting was at Virginia Tech in 2007, when 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people. In 2012, twenty children and seven adults were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

 

License and registration requirements:

  • To own a gun in Canada, residents must take a safety course and pass both a written and a practical exam. The license expires in five years. Residents have to register restricted firearms, such as handguns and automatic weapons, with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's Canadian Firearms Program.
  • In the U.S., license and registration laws vary from states to state, often with no such requirements. There is no mandatory course or exam.

Background checks:

  • Canada requires a background check that focuses on mental health and addiction. Agents are required to inform an applicant’s spouse or family before granting a license.
  • The U.S. requires a federal background check for all those buying guns from licensed dealers but does not require one in private transactions such as at gun shows.

Information is gathered from data collected by the Small Arms Study, The United Nations Office on Drug and Crime, and the Canadian Firearms Program.

 

This one would stifle many a sold gun :P

All licensing and registration is managed by the RCMP's Canadian Firearms Program (CFP), under the Deputy Commissioner Policing Support Services (PSS). In the Canadian system, there are three classes of firearms and firearm licences: non-restricted, restricted and prohibited. Prohibited firearms are not forbidden outright, as the name might imply, but their legal possession and acquisition are dependent upon their registration history and an individual's firearm licence.[22] As of December 1, 1998, the prohibited clause must be grandfathered to acquire or possess prohibited firearms. New prohibited licences are available only at the discretion of the Chief Firearms Officer of the province or the RCMP[citation needed]. See Classification of firearms below for complete details on prohibited, restricted and non-restricted firearms.

Individuals who wish to possess or acquire firearms in Canada must have a valid possession-acquisition, or possession-only, licence (PAL/POL); either of these licences allows the licensee to purchase ammunition. The PAL is distributed exclusively by the RCMP and is generally obtained in the following three steps:

  1. Safety training: To be eligible to receive a PAL, all applicants must successfully complete the Canadian Firearms Safety Course[23] (CFSC) for a non-restricted licence, and the Canadian Restricted Firearms Safety Course[24] (CRFSC) for a restricted licence; the non-restricted class is a prerequisite to the restricted licence. Each province/territory's chief firearms officer publishes information on the locations and availability of these courses.[25]
  2. Applying for a licence: Currently only one type of licence is available to new applicants, the possession-acquisition licence (PAL). People can request a PAL by filling out Form CAFC 921.[26]
  3. Security screening: Background checks and reference interviews are performed. All applicants are screened, and a mandatory 28-day waiting period is imposed on first-time applicants, but final approval time may be longer.[27]

Licences are typically valid for five years and must be renewed prior to expiry to maintain all classes. Once licensed, an individual can apply for a firearm transfer;[28] and an authorization to transport (ATT) for restricted firearms.[29] People may hunt with firearms in Canada only with non-restricted firearms, and this requires an additional "Hunting with Firearms" course.

 

Businesses, museums and organizations must have a valid firearms business licence to possess, manufacture or sell firearms, restricted or prohibited firearms, prohibited devices, or prohibited ammunition. A licence is not required to possess regular ammunition, but is required to manufacture or sell ammunition. A separate licence is required for each location where the business operates, and each business licence is valid only for the activities specified on the licence.

Registering firearms. In order to be legally owned, a restricted or prohibited firearm must be registered in the Canadian Firearms Registry, which stores all data regarding firearms in Canada. To register a firearm into the system, a firearm must first be verified; its identification and classification being confirmed by an authorized verifier working with the RCMP. One must submit a registration application, which can be done online. If the firearm is being transferred from one owner to another the process can be done by telephone. Firearm registration certificates do not expire and do not need to be renewed. The Canadian Firearms Registry Online (CFRO) is accessible to police through CPIC.

Public Agents Firearms Regulations, which took effect on October 31, 2008, require public service agencies to report all firearms in their possession. Agency firearms are those used by employees (i.e. service firearms) while protected firearms are those that have been found or seized or are otherwise being held. The timely reporting and sharing of information about protected firearms is particularly important for police as it will have a significant impact on investigators' efforts to monitor the locations, movement and distribution of illicit firearms in Canada.

 

 

 

 
 
 
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1 minute ago, Middl3 said:

By the Numbers: How Canada's Gun Laws Compare With Ours

Gun violence has become all too common in the U.S., but it made for a rare headline Wednesday when two shootings in Canada left a soldier and a gunman dead, The Globe and Mail reported.

The Ottawa shootings at the National War Memorial and inside Parliament shone a light on our northern neighbor’s laws, which have often been credited with helping Canada avoid the multitudes of mass shootings the U.S. has seen.

Annual homicides by gun:

  • Canada had 173 homicides by gun, according to a 2012 report.
  • The U.S. had 9,146 that year.

Total number of civilian guns:

  • Canada has 9,950,000.
  • The U.S. has more than 27 times as many: 270,000,000.

Guns per person:

  • Canada reports 30.8 firearms per 100 people. The country ranks 13 worldwide for firearms per capita, according to a report published by The Washington Post in September.
  • The U.S. has 88.8. It ranks No. 1.

Waiting period to purchase a gun:

  • Canada requires a 60-day waiting period.
  • There is no federally mandated waiting period in the U.S. Residents can receive a gun after a background check.

Largest mass shootings:

  • Canada’s largest mass shooting was in 1989, when 25-year-old Marc Lepine killed 14 people at Montreal's École Polytechnique.
  • The U.S. has had 160 mass shooting incidents between 2000 and 2013, CNN reports from a study released by the FBI. The largest U.S. shooting was at Virginia Tech in 2007, when 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people. In 2012, twenty children and seven adults were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

 

License and registration requirements:

  • To own a gun in Canada, residents must take a safety course and pass both a written and a practical exam. The license expires in five years. Residents have to register restricted firearms, such as handguns and automatic weapons, with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's Canadian Firearms Program.
  • In the U.S., license and registration laws vary from states to state, often with no such requirements. There is no mandatory course or exam.

Background checks:

  • Canada requires a background check that focuses on mental health and addiction. Agents are required to inform an applicant’s spouse or family before granting a license.
  • The U.S. requires a federal background check for all those buying guns from licensed dealers but does not require one in private transactions such as at gun shows.

Information is gathered from data collected by the Small Arms Study, The United Nations Office on Drug and Crime, and the Canadian Firearms Program.

 

This one would stifle many a sold gun :P

All licensing and registration is managed by the RCMP's Canadian Firearms Program (CFP), under the Deputy Commissioner Policing Support Services (PSS). In the Canadian system, there are three classes of firearms and firearm licences: non-restricted, restricted and prohibited. Prohibited firearms are not forbidden outright, as the name might imply, but their legal possession and acquisition are dependent upon their registration history and an individual's firearm licence.[22] As of December 1, 1998, the prohibited clause must be grandfathered to acquire or possess prohibited firearms. New prohibited licences are available only at the discretion of the Chief Firearms Officer of the province or the RCMP[citation needed]. See Classification of firearms below for complete details on prohibited, restricted and non-restricted firearms.

Individuals who wish to possess or acquire firearms in Canada must have a valid possession-acquisition, or possession-only, licence (PAL/POL); either of these licences allows the licensee to purchase ammunition. The PAL is distributed exclusively by the RCMP and is generally obtained in the following three steps:

  1. Safety training: To be eligible to receive a PAL, all applicants must successfully complete the Canadian Firearms Safety Course[23] (CFSC) for a non-restricted licence, and the Canadian Restricted Firearms Safety Course[24] (CRFSC) for a restricted licence; the non-restricted class is a prerequisite to the restricted licence. Each province/territory's chief firearms officer publishes information on the locations and availability of these courses.[25]
  2. Applying for a licence: Currently only one type of licence is available to new applicants, the possession-acquisition licence (PAL). People can request a PAL by filling out Form CAFC 921.[26]
  3. Security screening: Background checks and reference interviews are performed. All applicants are screened, and a mandatory 28-day waiting period is imposed on first-time applicants, but final approval time may be longer.[27]

Licences are typically valid for five years and must be renewed prior to expiry to maintain all classes. Once licensed, an individual can apply for a firearm transfer;[28] and an authorization to transport (ATT) for restricted firearms.[29] People may hunt with firearms in Canada only with non-restricted firearms, and this requires an additional "Hunting with Firearms" course.

 

Businesses, museums and organizations must have a valid firearms business licence to possess, manufacture or sell firearms, restricted or prohibited firearms, prohibited devices, or prohibited ammunition. A licence is not required to possess regular ammunition, but is required to manufacture or sell ammunition. A separate licence is required for each location where the business operates, and each business licence is valid only for the activities specified on the licence.

Registering firearms. In order to be legally owned, a restricted or prohibited firearm must be registered in the Canadian Firearms Registry, which stores all data regarding firearms in Canada. To register a firearm into the system, a firearm must first be verified; its identification and classification being confirmed by an authorized verifier working with the RCMP. One must submit a registration application, which can be done online. If the firearm is being transferred from one owner to another the process can be done by telephone. Firearm registration certificates do not expire and do not need to be renewed. The Canadian Firearms Registry Online (CFRO) is accessible to police through CPIC.

Public Agents Firearms Regulations, which took effect on October 31, 2008, require public service agencies to report all firearms in their possession. Agency firearms are those used by employees (i.e. service firearms) while protected firearms are those that have been found or seized or are otherwise being held. The timely reporting and sharing of information about protected firearms is particularly important for police as it will have a significant impact on investigators' efforts to monitor the locations, movement and distribution of illicit firearms in Canada.

 

 

 

 
 
 

This number is questionable ...The U.S. has more than 27 times as many: 270,000,000

 

Estimates have the number of guns in the U.S at around 300/340/350 million give or take 10 million + or minus, so 270, yes, does fall in the estimate range but its more like 340 to 350 million.

 

http://www.gunfaq.org/2013/03/how-many-guns-in-the-united-states/

 

We need more guns but righties won't admit this. Phony righties

 

 

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1 minute ago, Golfboy said:

No one gives a shit how Canada's laws compare to ours.   They don't have our Constitution, so they can disarm their citizens if they want. 

If you don't like our country, get the fuck out. 

 

I am glad you agree golfboy that we need more guns

 

Kudos

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7 minutes ago, Middl3 said:

By the Numbers: How Canada's Gun Laws Compare With Ours

Gun violence has become all too common in the U.S., but it made for a rare headline Wednesday when two shootings in Canada left a soldier and a gunman dead, The Globe and Mail reported.

The Ottawa shootings at the National War Memorial and inside Parliament shone a light on our northern neighbor’s laws, which have often been credited with helping Canada avoid the multitudes of mass shootings the U.S. has seen.

Annual homicides by gun:

  • Canada had 173 homicides by gun, according to a 2012 report.
  • The U.S. had 9,146 that year.

Total number of civilian guns:

  • Canada has 9,950,000.
  • The U.S. has more than 27 times as many: 270,000,000.

Guns per person:

  • Canada reports 30.8 firearms per 100 people. The country ranks 13 worldwide for firearms per capita, according to a report published by The Washington Post in September.
  • The U.S. has 88.8. It ranks No. 1.

Waiting period to purchase a gun:

  • Canada requires a 60-day waiting period.
  • There is no federally mandated waiting period in the U.S. Residents can receive a gun after a background check.

Largest mass shootings:

  • Canada’s largest mass shooting was in 1989, when 25-year-old Marc Lepine killed 14 people at Montreal's École Polytechnique.
  • The U.S. has had 160 mass shooting incidents between 2000 and 2013, CNN reports from a study released by the FBI. The largest U.S. shooting was at Virginia Tech in 2007, when 23-year-old student Seung-Hui Cho killed 32 people. In 2012, twenty children and seven adults were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

 

License and registration requirements:

  • To own a gun in Canada, residents must take a safety course and pass both a written and a practical exam. The license expires in five years. Residents have to register restricted firearms, such as handguns and automatic weapons, with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's Canadian Firearms Program.
  • In the U.S., license and registration laws vary from states to state, often with no such requirements. There is no mandatory course or exam.

Background checks:

  • Canada requires a background check that focuses on mental health and addiction. Agents are required to inform an applicant’s spouse or family before granting a license.
  • The U.S. requires a federal background check for all those buying guns from licensed dealers but does not require one in private transactions such as at gun shows.

Information is gathered from data collected by the Small Arms Study, The United Nations Office on Drug and Crime, and the Canadian Firearms Program.

 

This one would stifle many a sold gun :P

All licensing and registration is managed by the RCMP's Canadian Firearms Program (CFP), under the Deputy Commissioner Policing Support Services (PSS). In the Canadian system, there are three classes of firearms and firearm licences: non-restricted, restricted and prohibited. Prohibited firearms are not forbidden outright, as the name might imply, but their legal possession and acquisition are dependent upon their registration history and an individual's firearm licence.[22] As of December 1, 1998, the prohibited clause must be grandfathered to acquire or possess prohibited firearms. New prohibited licences are available only at the discretion of the Chief Firearms Officer of the province or the RCMP[citation needed]. See Classification of firearms below for complete details on prohibited, restricted and non-restricted firearms.

Individuals who wish to possess or acquire firearms in Canada must have a valid possession-acquisition, or possession-only, licence (PAL/POL); either of these licences allows the licensee to purchase ammunition. The PAL is distributed exclusively by the RCMP and is generally obtained in the following three steps:

  1. Safety training: To be eligible to receive a PAL, all applicants must successfully complete the Canadian Firearms Safety Course[23] (CFSC) for a non-restricted licence, and the Canadian Restricted Firearms Safety Course[24] (CRFSC) for a restricted licence; the non-restricted class is a prerequisite to the restricted licence. Each province/territory's chief firearms officer publishes information on the locations and availability of these courses.[25]
  2. Applying for a licence: Currently only one type of licence is available to new applicants, the possession-acquisition licence (PAL). People can request a PAL by filling out Form CAFC 921.[26]
  3. Security screening: Background checks and reference interviews are performed. All applicants are screened, and a mandatory 28-day waiting period is imposed on first-time applicants, but final approval time may be longer.[27]

Licences are typically valid for five years and must be renewed prior to expiry to maintain all classes. Once licensed, an individual can apply for a firearm transfer;[28] and an authorization to transport (ATT) for restricted firearms.[29] People may hunt with firearms in Canada only with non-restricted firearms, and this requires an additional "Hunting with Firearms" course.

 

Businesses, museums and organizations must have a valid firearms business licence to possess, manufacture or sell firearms, restricted or prohibited firearms, prohibited devices, or prohibited ammunition. A licence is not required to possess regular ammunition, but is required to manufacture or sell ammunition. A separate licence is required for each location where the business operates, and each business licence is valid only for the activities specified on the licence.

Registering firearms. In order to be legally owned, a restricted or prohibited firearm must be registered in the Canadian Firearms Registry, which stores all data regarding firearms in Canada. To register a firearm into the system, a firearm must first be verified; its identification and classification being confirmed by an authorized verifier working with the RCMP. One must submit a registration application, which can be done online. If the firearm is being transferred from one owner to another the process can be done by telephone. Firearm registration certificates do not expire and do not need to be renewed. The Canadian Firearms Registry Online (CFRO) is accessible to police through CPIC.

Public Agents Firearms Regulations, which took effect on October 31, 2008, require public service agencies to report all firearms in their possession. Agency firearms are those used by employees (i.e. service firearms) while protected firearms are those that have been found or seized or are otherwise being held. The timely reporting and sharing of information about protected firearms is particularly important for police as it will have a significant impact on investigators' efforts to monitor the locations, movement and distribution of illicit firearms in Canada.

 

 

 

 
 
 

move there permanently.

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Just now, BatteryPowered said:

Two things you forgot to mention;

 

In Canada blacks make up a much smaller percentage of the population...most homicides in the US are committed by blacks.

 

The Canadian Constitution does not ensure their citizens the right to bear arms...the US Constitution does.

 

 

 

<most homicides in the US are committed by blacks.>

 

They are?

 

Link?

 

Proof?

 

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2 minutes ago, justrying said:

<most homicides in the US are committed by blacks.>

 

They are?

 

Link?

 

Proof?

 

Yes. They are.

Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter

Blacks:  4935
Whites:  4192

 

Just to be clear,  4192 is less than 4935.   I only explain this because we both know you can't do math.

 

 

 

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You guys totally missed the point or did not bother to read the laws on Canada to get a gun..You must get family wives, ex wives, friends if you have any to green light you :P

 

That alone would shut down many a gun buy here.

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8 minutes ago, BatteryPowered said:

In Canada blacks make up a much smaller percentage of the population...most homicides in the US are committed by blacks.

 

BP...you are a racist for pointing out the obvious.

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7 minutes ago, justrying said:

<most homicides in the US are committed by blacks.>

 

They are?

 

Link?

 

Proof?

 

 

FBI a good enough source for you?

 

Total murders = 13,326

Race of Offenders:

White = 4,636

Black (or African-American) = 5,620

 

https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2015/crime-in-the-u.s.-2015/tables/expanded_homicide_data_table_3_murder_offenders_by_age_sex_and_race_2015.xls

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2 minutes ago, Middl3 said:

You guys totally missed the point or did not bother to read the laws on Canada to get a gun..You must get family wives, ex wives, friends if you have any to green light you :P

 

That alone would shut down many a gun buy here.

Move to Canada.  Get the Bad word out.   No one wants you here anyway, why don't you move somewhere that you'd be happy?

 

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Just now, Golfboy said:

^^ ignorant tool got owned again.  

You're welcome.

no I didn't. I asked for link and proof. There it is

 

But kudos to you for admitting 340/350 million guns in the U.S., is not enough and we need more guns. I agree

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2 minutes ago, justrying said:

no I didn't. I asked for link and proof. There it is

 

But kudos to you for admitting 340/350 million guns in the U.S., is not enough and we need more guns. I agree

What we need is more hands to hold all of those guns.

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4 minutes ago, BatteryPowered said:

 

FBI a good enough source for you?

 

Total murders = 13,326

Race of Offenders:

White = 4,636

Black (or African-American) = 5,620

 

https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2015/crime-in-the-u.s.-2015/tables/expanded_homicide_data_table_3_murder_offenders_by_age_sex_and_race_2015.xls

Absolutely!

 

All the more reason we need more guns in this country to fight this

 

You agree, don't you?

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Poor things.

 

Canada has a population of 36.5 Million vs. 356 MILLION in the United States.

 

Canada has roughly 6-7 "cities" that are populations centers over 1 million vs the Unites States with over 250 of those.

 

And you want to make some comparison of OUR gun laws vs. theirs???

 

YOU seem to forget that in the UNITED STATES, we are CITIZENS. In Canada, they are SUBJECTS- without rights of ANY KIND UNLESS GIVEN TO THEM BY GOVERNMENT!!!

 

Sucks being a godd'amn sh'itstain MORON, huh. midolpoop???

 

 

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Just now, MidnightMax said:

Poor things.

 

Canada has a population of 36.5 Million vs. 356 MILLION in the United States.

 

Canada has roughly 6-7 "cities" that are populations centers over 1 million vs the Unites States with over 250 of those.

 

And you want to make some comparison of OUR gun laws vs. theirs???

 

YOU seem to forget that in the UNITED STATES, we are CITIZENS. In Canada, they are SUBJECTS- without rights of ANY KIND UNLESS GIVEN TO THEM BY GOVERNMENT!!!

 

Sucks being a godd'amn sh'itstain MORON, huh. midolpoop???

 

 

We need more guns. I'm glad you ($hitstains) agrees

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28 minutes ago, BatteryPowered said:

Two things you forgot to mention;

 

In Canada blacks make up a much smaller percentage of the population...most homicides in the US are committed by blacks.

 

The Canadian Constitution does not ensure their citizens the right to bear arms...the US Constitution does.

 

 

 

Mass shootings are carried out by whites

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