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Donald Trump and the climate deniers and fossil fuel company backers he’s nominated for his cabinet don’t realize it—or refuse to believe it—but the world is starting to pass them by when it comes to developing new sources of power. In the developing world, solar power is becoming the most cost-effective new source of electricity.

In nearly 60 lower-income countries, the average price of solar energy has dropped to $1.65 million per megawatt in 2016, just below wind at $1.66 million per megawatt. That means new energy development projects will focus on solar energy rather than wind power.

“Unsubsidized solar is beginning to outcompete coal and natural gas on a larger scale, and notably, new solar projects in emerging markets are costing less to build than wind projects,” says a report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance, a research and analysis organization for those investing in the energy industry.

According to a mid-December story from Bloomberg Technology about the report, called Climatescope:

This year has seen a remarkable run for solar power. Auctions, where private companies compete for massive contracts to provide electricity, established record after record for cheap solar power. It started with a contract in January to produce electricity for $64 per megawatt-hour in India; then a deal in August pegging $29.10 per megawatt-hour in Chile. That’s record-cheap electricity—roughly half the price of competing coal power.

“Renewables are robustly entering the era of undercutting” fossil fuel prices, BNEF Chairman Michael Liebreich said in a note to clients.

Undercutting fossil fuel prices. In other words, doing it more cheaply. And when you’re building a new infrastructure for electricity with limited resources—and you’re a country with abundant sunshine—you go with the least expensive option. And that ain’t coal, gas, or oil.

This chart shows the average cost of new wind and solar projects from 58 emerging-market economies. The countries studied include China, India, and Brazil.

740x-1.jpg?1482967709The Bloomberg data show how the price of solar power has dropped to a third of what it was in 2010.

The low-cost contracts discussed in the Bloomberg report are for new projects. It adds:

When all the 2016 completions are tallied in coming months, it’s likely that the total amount of solar photovoltaics [PVAs] added globally will exceed that of wind for the first time. The
call for 70 gigawatts of newly installed solar in 2016 compared with 59 gigawatts of wind.

The overall shift to clean energy can be more expensive in wealthier nations, where electricity demand is flat or falling and new solar must compete with existing billion-dollar coal and gas plants. But in countries that are adding new electricity capacity as quickly as possible, “renewable energy will beat any other technology in most of the world without subsidies,” said Liebreich.

This new development of cheaper solar power is being described as a turning point in the energy industry. “The world ... is adding more capacity for clean energy each year than for coal and natural gas combined. Peak fossil-fuel use for electricity may be reached within the next decade,” according to the story in Bloomberg.

Another story about the report in Science Alert discussed how the growth in solar marks some new milestones.

for a number of reasons, including falling equipment costs, new business models like
, growing investment, and a rise in clean energy policies.

It's also worth noting that prices fluctuate across the world, and solar isn't the cheapest deal everywhere just yet — the cost depends on sunshine availability, plus the energy contracts that are already in place, and what government subsidies are on offer.

But it's still a landmark moment for new energy costs in developing nations, and goes hand-in-hand with renewable energy now having become
in the world. …

Last year, China
in solar projects, more than the US ($44.1 billion), the UK ($22.2 billion), and Japan ($36.2 billion) put together.

Other points from the Climatescope report:

  • Steep solar equipment cost efficiencies are catalyzing build and driving economic growth.
  • Cheap solar, innovative business models, and a new breed of entrepreneurs are revolutionizing how energy access issues are addressed in least developed nations.
  • Developed economies are accelerating funding for clean energy in emerging markets.
  • Clean energy policies are becoming more widely adopted across Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • In ranking and profiling emerging markets for their ability to attract capital for low-carbon energy projects, the top-scoring markets were China, Chile, Brazil, Uruguay, South Africa, and India.

 

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Wonderful news. Market forces will allow more solar generated power. So what. Solar power will never power the entire country. Wind will never power the nation. The combination of solar and wind will never power the nation. Drill baby drill. Keep energy prices low.

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Donald Trump and the climate deniers and fossil fuel company backers he’s nominated for his cabinet don’t realize it—or refuse to believe it—but the world is starting to pass them by when it comes to developing new sources of power. In the developing world, solar power is becoming the most cost-effective new source of electricity.

In nearly 60 lower-income countries, the average price of solar energy has dropped to $1.65 million per megawatt in 2016, just below wind at $1.66 million per megawatt. That means new energy development projects will focus on solar energy rather than wind power.

“Unsubsidized solar is beginning to outcompete coal and natural gas on a larger scale, and notably, new solar projects in emerging markets are costing less to build than wind projects,” says a report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance, a research and analysis organization for those investing in the energy industry.

According to a mid-December story from Bloomberg Technology about the report, called Climatescope:

Undercutting fossil fuel prices. In other words, doing it more cheaply. And when you’re building a new infrastructure for electricity with limited resources—and you’re a country with abundant sunshine—you go with the least expensive option. And that ain’t coal, gas, or oil.

This year has seen a remarkable run for solar power. Auctions, where private companies compete for massive contracts to provide electricity, established record after record for cheap solar power. It started with a contract in January to produce electricity for $64 per megawatt-hour in India; then a deal in August pegging $29.10 per megawatt-hour in Chile. That’s record-cheap electricity—roughly half the price of competing coal power.

“Renewables are robustly entering the era of undercutting” fossil fuel prices, BNEF Chairman Michael Liebreich said in a note to clients.

This chart shows the average cost of new wind and solar projects from 58 emerging-market economies. The countries studied include China, India, and Brazil.

740x-1.jpg?1482967709The Bloomberg data show how the price of solar power has dropped to a third of what it was in 2010.

The low-cost contracts discussed in the Bloomberg report are for new projects. It adds:

This new development of cheaper solar power is being described as a turning point in the energy industry. “The world ... is adding more capacity for clean energy each year than for coal and natural gas combined. Peak fossil-fuel use for electricity may be reached within the next decade,” according to the story in Bloomberg.

When all the 2016 completions are tallied in coming months, it’s likely that the total amount of solar photovoltaics [PVAs] added globally will exceed that of wind for the first time. The latest BNEF projections call for 70 gigawatts of newly installed solar in 2016 compared with 59 gigawatts of wind.

The overall shift to clean energy can be more expensive in wealthier nations, where electricity demand is flat or falling and new solar must compete with existing billion-dollar coal and gas plants. But in countries that are adding new electricity capacity as quickly as possible, “renewable energy will beat any other technology in most of the world without subsidies,” said Liebreich.

Another story about the report in Science Alert discussed how the growth in solar marks some new milestones.

Other points from the Climatescope report:

Solar is booming for a number of reasons, including falling equipment costs, new business models like Tesla's home batteries, growing investment, and a rise in clean energy policies.

It's also worth noting that prices fluctuate across the world, and solar isn't the cheapest deal everywhere just yet — the cost depends on sunshine availability, plus the energy contracts that are already in place, and what government subsidies are on offer.

But it's still a landmark moment for new energy costs in developing nations, and goes hand-in-hand with renewable energy now having become the largest source of new power capacity in the world. …

Last year, China invested $103 billion in solar projects, more than the US ($44.1 billion), the UK ($22.2 billion), and Japan ($36.2 billion) put together.

  • Steep solar equipment cost efficiencies are catalyzing build and driving economic growth.
  • Cheap solar, innovative business models, and a new breed of entrepreneurs are revolutionizing how energy access issues are addressed in least developed nations.
  • Developed economies are accelerating funding for clean energy in emerging markets.
  • Clean energy policies are becoming more widely adopted across Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • In ranking and profiling emerging markets for their ability to attract capital for low-carbon energy projects, the top-scoring markets were China, Chile, Brazil, Uruguay, South Africa, and India.

 

 

The article cherry picks situations, factors, locations, etc. to frame their story.

 

 

The truth on the larger scale including all factors and locations is...

 

 

"Currently solar power is by far the most expensive renewable source to produce electricity, although increasing efficiency and longer lifespan of photovoltaic panels together with reduced production costs could make this source of energy more competitive."

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Wonderful news. Market forces will allow more solar generated power. So what. Solar power will never power the entire country. Wind will never power the nation. The combination of solar and wind will never power the nation. Drill baby drill. Keep energy prices low.

I burn wood, the renewable energy source.

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The article cherry picks situations, factors, locations, etc. to frame their story.

 

Also note the word "new" in the thread title.

 

 

The truth on the larger scale including all factors and locations is...

 

 

"Currently solar power is by far the most expensive renewable source to produce electricity, although increasing efficiency and longer lifespan of photovoltaic panels together with reduced production costs could make this source of energy more competitive."

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Wonderful news. Market forces will allow more solar generated power. So what. Solar power will never power the entire country. Wind will never power the nation. The combination of solar and wind will never power the nation. Drill baby drill. Keep energy prices low.

 

 

By_i4qwIcAAGbSG.jpg

"NEVER is for CHICKENSHIT-"conservative" PUSSIES!!!!"

conservative:

: believing in the value of established and traditional practices in politics and society

: not liking or accepting changes or new ideas

 

December 15, 2016

 

"A transformation is happening in global energy markets that’s worth noting as 2016 comes to an end: Solar power, for the first time, is becoming the cheapest form of new electricity.

 

This has happened in isolated projects in the past: an especially competitive auction in the Middle East, for example, resulting in record-cheap solar costs. But, now, unsubsidized solar is beginning to outcompete coal and natural gas on a larger scale, and notably, new solar projects in emerging markets are costing less to build than wind projects, according to fresh data from Bloomberg New Energy Finance."

https://www.bloomber...eaper-than-wind

 

 

 

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http://www.energymat...le-news/em3095/

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http://www.treehugge...ble-energy.html

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http://www.unep.org/...ID=6756&Lang=en

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http://www.ed.ac.uk/...id-scoops-award

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https://www.itdp.org...e-with-clinton/

 

 

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Cut an area - replant the area.


I support any clean alternate energy sources. Who wouldn't?

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"Solar power, for the first time, is becoming the cheapest form of new electricity."

 

 

Why doesn't the article drop "becoming" and "new".

 

 

Then just say "Solar power is the cheapest form of electricity"?

 

 

Because it would no longer be a true statement. That's why.

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Like other posters said, so what? If so-called 'renewable' sources are TRULY more efficient and provide greater VALUE (UNsubsidized of course) then I, and probably most conservatives would have no problem with other energy sources.

 

I think solar/wind could be great SUPPLEMENTS to our national grid. They just shouldn't get govt. help.

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Donald Trump and the climate deniers and fossil fuel company backers he’s nominated for his cabinet don’t realize it—or refuse to believe it—but the world is starting to pass them by when it comes to developing new sources of power. In the developing world, solar power is becoming the most cost-effective new source of electricity.

In nearly 60 lower-income countries, the average price of solar energy has dropped to $1.65 million per megawatt in 2016, just below wind at $1.66 million per megawatt. That means new energy development projects will focus on solar energy rather than wind power.

“Unsubsidized solar is beginning to outcompete coal and natural gas on a larger scale, and notably, new solar projects in emerging markets are costing less to build than wind projects,” says a report from Bloomberg New Energy Finance, a research and analysis organization for those investing in the energy industry.

According to a mid-December story from Bloomberg Technology about the report, called Climatescope:

This year has seen a remarkable run for solar power. Auctions, where private companies compete for massive contracts to provide electricity, established record after record for cheap solar power. It started with a contract in January to produce electricity for $64 per megawatt-hour in India; then a deal in August pegging $29.10 per megawatt-hour in Chile. That’s record-cheap electricity—roughly half the price of competing coal power.

“Renewables are robustly entering the era of undercutting” fossil fuel prices, BNEF Chairman Michael Liebreich said in a note to clients.

Undercutting fossil fuel prices. In other words, doing it more cheaply. And when you’re building a new infrastructure for electricity with limited resources—and you’re a country with abundant sunshine—you go with the least expensive option. And that ain’t coal, gas, or oil.

This chart shows the average cost of new wind and solar projects from 58 emerging-market economies. The countries studied include China, India, and Brazil.

740x-1.jpg?1482967709The Bloomberg data show how the price of solar power has dropped to a third of what it was in 2010.

The low-cost contracts discussed in the Bloomberg report are for new projects. It adds:

When all the 2016 completions are tallied in coming months, it’s likely that the total amount of solar photovoltaics [PVAs] added globally will exceed that of wind for the first time. The
call for 70 gigawatts of newly installed solar in 2016 compared with 59 gigawatts of wind.

The overall shift to clean energy can be more expensive in wealthier nations, where electricity demand is flat or falling and new solar must compete with existing billion-dollar coal and gas plants. But in countries that are adding new electricity capacity as quickly as possible, “renewable energy will beat any other technology in most of the world without subsidies,” said Liebreich.

This new development of cheaper solar power is being described as a turning point in the energy industry. “The world ... is adding more capacity for clean energy each year than for coal and natural gas combined. Peak fossil-fuel use for electricity may be reached within the next decade,” according to the story in Bloomberg.

Another story about the report in Science Alert discussed how the growth in solar marks some new milestones.

for a number of reasons, including falling equipment costs, new business models like
, growing investment, and a rise in clean energy policies.

It's also worth noting that prices fluctuate across the world, and solar isn't the cheapest deal everywhere just yet — the cost depends on sunshine availability, plus the energy contracts that are already in place, and what government subsidies are on offer.

But it's still a landmark moment for new energy costs in developing nations, and goes hand-in-hand with renewable energy now having become
in the world. …

Last year, China
in solar projects, more than the US ($44.1 billion), the UK ($22.2 billion), and Japan ($36.2 billion) put together.

Other points from the Climatescope report:

  • Steep solar equipment cost efficiencies are catalyzing build and driving economic growth.
  • Cheap solar, innovative business models, and a new breed of entrepreneurs are revolutionizing how energy access issues are addressed in least developed nations.
  • Developed economies are accelerating funding for clean energy in emerging markets.
  • Clean energy policies are becoming more widely adopted across Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • In ranking and profiling emerging markets for their ability to attract capital for low-carbon energy projects, the top-scoring markets were China, Chile, Brazil, Uruguay, South Africa, and India.

 

 

 

 

Trump said several times he IS FOR clean energy! ... good lord, you're an idiot! LISTEN for a change!

 

BUT, he won't so stupid to throw $500 billion taxpayer money at a Solandra who went belly up! That was YOUR boy's idiotic move! (Trump ain't that dumb)

 

Leave it up to the private sector to develop solar and other clean energy opportunities... they WILL find a way to do it effectively! You can't FORCE them!

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Donald Trump and the climate deniers and fossil fuel company backers he’s nominated for his cabinet don’t realize it—or refuse to believe it—but the world is starting to pass them by when it comes to developing new sources of power. In the developing world, solar power is becoming the most cost-effective new source of electricity.

In nearly 60 lower-income countries, the average price of solar energy has dropped to $1.65 million per megawatt in 2016, just below wind at $1.66 million per megawatt. That means new energy development projects will focus on solar energy rather than wind power.

That's great news! Now all they have to do is figure out how to generate power at night.

I'm all for new energy sources that don't have to be subsidized in order to survive.

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That's great news! Now all they have to do is figure out how to generate power at night.

I'm all for new energy sources that don't have to be subsidized in order to survive.

"There is far more danger in public than private monopoly,

for when government goes into business it can always shift its losses to the taxpayer.

Government never makes ends meet - and that is the first requisite of business."

- Thomas Edison

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Solar power is free to get as good as it wants. I am all for cheap energy. However not developing alternatives like Thorium is retarded. The leftists here don't understand science or physics so they don't really have any idea how much energy it takes to power the greater activities of man.

 

Even in solar loving Germany this is the energy break down:

  • Nuclear: 91.8 TWh (17.2%)
  • Brown coal: 140.7 TWh (26.4%)
  • Hard coal: 110.1 TWh (20.7%)
  • Natural gas: 33.9 TWh (6.4%)
  • Wind: 51.4 TWh (9.7%)
  • Solar: 32.8 TWh (6.2%)
  • Biomass: 53 TWh (10.0%)
  • Hydro: 18.5 TWh (3.5%)

Congratulations, solar may surpass the most primitive energy source "biomass" if it doubles.

 

However, lets not bash solar power for not catching up yet. It has great potential. Consider the Elon Musk dream of space flight. The minimum gravitational potential energy needs to be overcome: for the Kármán line this is approximately 1 MJ/kg. W=mgh, m=1 kg, g=9.82 m/s2, h=105m. W=1*9.82*105≈106J/kg=1MJ/kg

 

For one of his upcoming ideas he suggests the "the goal will be to send 100 metric tons (110 tons) of "useful payload." This obviously requires a very big spaceship and booster system," Musk said.

http://www.space.com/28215-elon-musk-spacex-mars-colony-idea.html

 

The payload of 110 tons has a mass of 99790.3kg. Using our 1MJ/kg calculation we arrive at a total energy of about 100 Gigajoules for just getting the payload into orbit. However in order to get 100 gigajoules of energy, you need fuel. In order to make that amount of energetic fuel, you need 2-3 times the energy investment into the chemical reactions to make this. So lets be kind to the liberals and say 300 gigawatts.

 

Now lets look at the entire solar output of Germany. It can peak up to record 30-some gigawatts in an hour during high sun, but over the course of an entire day we have to say it brings the hourly average down to around 1/3 of that. So 10 gigawatts/hr. With the entire solar output of the most solar nation you can collect enough energy to put Elon's Musks payload into orbit in a little over a day. (If you neglect the mass of the ship and the rest of vehicle carrying the equipment.) Not a small feat by any means.

 

However, as surprising as it may be, sending a shuttle to orbit is by no means to most energy intensive project we undertake as a nation. For example, we consume 1.58 x 10^17 joules worth of electricity alone to make aluminum in the United States. (150 trillion btu to joules.) http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=7570

 

Right now all of the solar power of Germany could make about 1.2 x 10^17 joules in a year. Keep going, you will soon match the energy demand of a single industry.

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dirty oil dirty coal haven't been subsidized....OK,,,,sure, Yup!

 

Really??

 

So show us a "subsidy" they receive.

And just for the record- 100% of the "nations" you mentioned ARE GETTING MONEY FROM THE United States to PAY FOR their "solar" bullshit.

 

Along with money from OTHER nations too.

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Really??

 

So show us a "subsidy" they receive.

And just for the record- 100% of the "nations" you mentioned ARE GETTING MONEY FROM THE United States to PAY FOR their "solar" bullshit.

 

Along with money from OTHER nations too.

I am sure she will show us some tax reduction and call it a 'subsidy'.

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Wonderful news. Market forces will allow more solar generated power. So what. Solar power will never power the entire country. Wind will never power the nation. The combination of solar and wind will never power the nation. Drill baby drill. Keep energy prices low.

Why?

 

It's kinda kike that "we need to raise taxes so we can get the economy roaring again" myth and BULLSHIT!!

 

I love that one.

Yeah, we shouldn't be taxed at all. I like that one.

 

Really??

 

So show us a "subsidy" they receive.

And just for the record- 100% of the "nations" you mentioned ARE GETTING MONEY FROM THE United States to PAY FOR their "solar" bullshit.

 

Along with money from OTHER nations too.

Allocation of subsidies in the United States
  • Renewable energy: $7.3 billion (45 percent)
  • Energy efficiency: $4.8 billion (29 percent)
  • Fossil fuels: $3.2 billion (20 percent)
  • Nuclear energy: $1.1 billion (7 percent)

https://www.google.com/search?q=oil+subsidies&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

I burn wood, the renewable energy source.

That power your hot water system?

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Why?

Yeah, we shouldn't be taxed at all. I like that one.

Allocation of subsidies in the United States
  • Renewable energy: $7.3 billion (45 percent)
  • Energy efficiency: $4.8 billion (29 percent)
  • Fossil fuels: $3.2 billion (20 percent)
  • Nuclear energy: $1.1 billion (7 percent)

https://www.google.com/search?q=oil+subsidies&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

That power your hot water system?

 

Now the PROBLEM with your little bullshit is...

TAX LAWS are NOT DIRECT SUBSIDIES.

 

Sucks for you, huh???

 

Show me a DIRECT GOVERNMENT SUBSIDY that goes DIRECTLY to OIL AND COAL PRODUCERS LIKE IT DOES TO "ALTERNATIVE ENERGY" PRODUCERS!!!

 

Doesn't exist since ALL of the same TAX LAWS APPLY TO BOTH INDUSTRIES!!!

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/drillinginfo/2016/02/22/debunking-myths-about-federal-oil-gas-subsidies/2/#2f19c1542185

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