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Is Social Security Going Broke after 87 years of success?


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Is Social Security going bankrupt?


Social Security can never go bankrupt. Nearly all (97 percent) of its income comes from the contributions of workers and employers, or interest on these contributions. Hence as long as there are workers in America, Social Security will have income. Even if Congress were to take no action, Social Security could pay 100% of promised benefits for the next two decades, and more than three-quarters of benefits after that. Around 2033 there will be a modest funding gap requiring modest increases in revenues to guarantee everyone 100% of promised benefits.






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Home Is Social Security going bankrupt?
Is Social Security going bankrupt?

Social Security can never go bankrupt. Nearly all (97 percent) of its income comes from the contributions of workers and employers, or interest on these contributions. Hence as long as there are workers in America, Social Security will have income. Even if Congress were to take no action, Social Security could pay 100% of promised benefits for the next two decades, and more than three-quarters of benefits after that. Around 2033 there will be a modest funding gap requiring modest increases in revenues to guarantee everyone 100% of promised benefits.

 

What in the last 50 years was added to the original concept that Social Security would be used as? The system was created to be as corrupting as the income tax put into law 20 years earlier.

 

See, in the 60's it became a funding gimmick to balance the budget, then in the 90's it was setup to pay benefits for those never paying into it with the American Disabilities Act that made bad behavioral choices a social disease those that didn't make them had to payt for those that do.

 

Usually rural areas paying for urban sprawl. Goes back to that ancestoral double jeapordy society places upon self reliant persons taking care of their own needs, wants, and problems without taking issue with how others live their own lives under the natural order of left alone, leave alone.

 

But since rule of law works against being honest with oneself, corruption is a social way of life for minds dreaming now isn't Eternity into a global society where academically and artistically living as if it is true defended and prtected through economic trade ancestral position for rank in societal evolution..

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Frequently Asked Questions about Medicare

As Congress and the incoming Administration debate changes to our nation’s health care system, Americans should be especially watchful for proposals that would cut or weaken Medicare, including proposals that would privatize benefits. Medicare is a large and complex program, … Continue reading

Posted in Fact Sheets, Reports & Resources Tagged Medicare Frequently Asked Questions about Social Security’s COLA

In October 2016, Social Security’s annual cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) for 2017 will be calculated, and Social Security beneficiaries will learn by what percentage their monthly benefits will be adjusted in the coming year to offset the effects of inflation. Social … Continue reading

Posted in Fact Sheets, Reports & Resources Tagged COLA, Expand Social Security, Medicare, Veterans

 

 

Home Is Social Security going bankrupt?
Is Social Security going bankrupt?

Social Security can never go bankrupt. Nearly all (97 percent) of its income comes from the contributions of workers and employers, or interest on these contributions. Hence as long as there are workers in America, Social Security will have income. Even if Congress were to take no action, Social Security could pay 100% of promised benefits for the next two decades, and more than three-quarters of benefits after that. Around 2033 there will be a modest funding gap requiring modest increases in revenues to guarantee everyone 100% of promised benefits.

 

 

 

why would anyone say no to $800-$1050 a month as a supplement ? guaranteed? Why is Social Security so important?

Social Security works for all Americans, and it has never been more important to our economic security:

  • Fifty-five million depend on Social Security – 1 out of every 6 Americans.
  • Nearly 2 out of 3 seniors depend on Social Security for most of their income.
  • More than 1 out of 3 seniors rely on it for at virtually all (90% or more) of their income.
  • Social Security’s benefits are modest, but vital, averaging around $15,000 per year.
  • Social Security lifts 22.2 million Americans out of poverty. Without it, the poverty rate of our seniors would be 44%; instead it is 9%.
  • It is an extremely efficient program, with administrative costs of less than a penny on the dollar
  • AND USERS pay for this program so in essence they are getting their money back.
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Home How is Social Security funded?






How is Social Security funded?


Social Security’s revenue was about $840 billion in 2012. The program has three sources of income. The largest source comes from workers and employers who contribute 6.2% each on wages up to $117,000 a year; this raises 84% of the total. The second source is investment income from Social Security’s reserves, which are held in Trust and invested in interest-bearing U.S. treasury bonds; this raises 13% of total revenue. Finally, Social Security gets 3% of its revenue from the taxes that beneficiaries pay on their Social Security benefits.






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@sole result

 

societal evolution??..That came to a halt when they voted for Trump. Hate now rules. Reason has been tossed further out that window.

Genetic continuation self contained as spaced apart now ancestrally in plain sight. Actual self evident kinetic results that do not happen at any other time than here now.

 

Funny how honesty is personal choice and corruption rules reality holding everyone accountable for not honoring denying the self evident as those in power of making hypothetical values matter.

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Koch Brothers Exposed documentary began as a series of 13 two- to twelve-minute viral videos intended to portray David and Charles Koch’s negative impact on a variety of aspects of American life.

The billionaire Koch Brothers have been described as “the poster boys of the 1 percent.” Their conglomerate, Koch Industries, is one of the largest private firms in the nation, with estimated annual revenues in the range of $100 billion. Liberal organizations argue that their extraordinary wealth and overwhelming political influence harm many progressive causes, such as the environment, education, campaign finance, and labor rights.

Some of the alleged wrongdoing highlighted in the film includes:

  • Efforts to gut Social Security. Spending more than $28 million, the Kochs have funded hundreds of reports, commentaries and books which popularized the fiction that Social Security is on the brink of collapse.
  • Attempts at re-segregation. The film reports on Koch-funded efforts to remake a North Carolina school district’s diversity policy, in effect re-segregating the schools.
  • Voter Suppression. Koch money has supported voter ID laws in 38 states. These laws are billed as a way to avoid voter fraud, but the film argues that they are actually intended to make it more difficult for Democrats to vote.
  • Keystone XL. The Kochs use their influence to sway legislation regarding the Keystone XL pipeline. Koch Industries has a significant financial interest in this oil and gas project.
  • Cancer in Crosset. A Koch paper plant pollutes the air and water of a community in Arkansas. The film explores a link with a cancer cluster in the small African-American community.
  • Higher Education. The Kochs give millions of dollars to universities, with the stipulation that the schools must hire Koch-sympathetic professors.

Robert Greenwald attempts to evoke a visceral reaction from his viewers by telling the stories of individuals whose lives have been harmed by Koch activities. Regarding this film, he is quoted as saying, “You reach the heart first. What I always try to do is make the political personal."

 

 

https://freedocumentaries.org/documentary/koch-brothers-exposed

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Home Is Social Security going bankrupt?
Is Social Security going bankrupt?

Social Security can never go bankrupt. Nearly all (97 percent) of its income comes from the contributions of workers and employers, or interest on these contributions. Hence as long as there are workers in America, Social Security will have income. Even if Congress were to take no action, Social Security could pay 100% of promised benefits for the next two decades, and more than three-quarters of benefits after that. Around 2033 there will be a modest funding gap requiring modest increases in revenues to guarantee everyone 100% of promised benefits.

 

 

 

Koch Brothers Exposed documentary began as a series of 13 two- to twelve-minute viral videos intended to portray David and Charles Koch’s negative impact on a variety of aspects of American life.

The billionaire Koch Brothers have been described as “the poster boys of the 1 percent.” Their conglomerate, Koch Industries, is one of the largest private firms in the nation, with estimated annual revenues in the range of $100 billion. Liberal organizations argue that their extraordinary wealth and overwhelming political influence harm many progressive causes, such as the environment, education, campaign finance, and labor rights.

Some of the alleged wrongdoing highlighted in the film includes:

  • Efforts to gut Social Security. Spending more than $28 million, the Kochs have funded hundreds of reports, commentaries and books which popularized the fiction that Social Security is on the brink of collapse.
  • Attempts at re-segregation. The film reports on Koch-funded efforts to remake a North Carolina school district’s diversity policy, in effect re-segregating the schools.
  • Voter Suppression. Koch money has supported voter ID laws in 38 states. These laws are billed as a way to avoid voter fraud, but the film argues that they are actually intended to make it more difficult for Democrats to vote.
  • Keystone XL. The Kochs use their influence to sway legislation regarding the Keystone XL pipeline. Koch Industries has a significant financial interest in this oil and gas project.
  • Cancer in Crosset. A Koch paper plant pollutes the air and water of a community in Arkansas. The film explores a link with a cancer cluster in the small African-American community.
  • Higher Education. The Kochs give millions of dollars to universities, with the stipulation that the schools must hire Koch-sympathetic professors.

Robert Greenwald attempts to evoke a visceral reaction from his viewers by telling the stories of individuals whose lives have been harmed by Koch activities. Regarding this film, he is quoted as saying, “You reach the heart first. What I always try to do is make the political personal."

 

 

https://freedocumentaries.org/documentary/koch-brothers-exposed

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This is why Ponzi Schemes are illegal.

They "work" for awhile, then you can no longer pay people back because there isn't enough money coming in.

 

What these buttflecks don't seem to get is that if ANY Business were to set up a retirement scheme like Social Security, they would be put in prison for a very long time.

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What these buttflecks don't seem to get is that if ANY Business were to set up a retirement scheme like Social Security, they would be put in prison for a very long time.

Have you ever mathematically figured out a way to make something like social security work individually? I have, but like all hypothetical situations there are more ways it won't work than how it could work honestly.

 

I came up with it working on a way to bankrupt government from within the top 20% income earners of society not working for the government paid from taxation. Takes 40 years to make it work.

 

Now many people here understand what it takes to maintain living self contianed to the moment here all 40 years where the past ends now and thr future forever starts here?

 

Rule or measure by hypothetical standards is dishonest and when everyone does it to save symbolism over substance mentality, the power of suggestion remains eternally corrupted throughout a species governing ancestry cradle to grave using psychological class warfare as standardize practice of controlling human behavior individually, ancestrally.

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Home How is Social Security funded?
How is Social Security funded?

Social Security’s revenue was about $840 billion in 2012. The program has three sources of income. The largest source comes from workers and employers who contribute 6.2% each on wages up to $117,000 a year; this raises 84% of the total. The second source is investment income from Social Security’s reserves, which are held in Trust and invested in interest-bearing U.S. treasury bonds; this raises 13% of total revenue. Finally, Social Security gets 3% of its revenue from the taxes that beneficiaries pay on their Social Security benefits.

 

 

 

 

Home Isn’t Social Security the cause of our large federal deficit?
Isn’t Social Security the cause of our large federal deficit?

Not at all. Social Security has its own dedicated revenue stream described above, so it cannot contribute a penny to the federal deficit. In fact, it currently enjoys a $2.7 trillion surplus that will grow to $2.9 trillion by 2020. And Social Security is forbidden by law from borrowing, so it cannot deficit spend.

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Home Is Social Security going bankrupt?
Is Social Security going bankrupt?

Social Security can never go bankrupt. Nearly all (97 percent) of its income comes from the contributions of workers and employers, or interest on these contributions. Hence as long as there are workers in America, Social Security will have income. Even if Congress were to take no action, Social Security could pay 100% of promised benefits for the next two decades, and more than three-quarters of benefits after that. Around 2033 there will be a modest funding gap requiring modest increases in revenues to guarantee everyone 100% of promised benefits.

 

 

 

 

Home Why are Social Security’s protections irreplaceable?
Why are Social Security’s protections irreplaceable?

The best part about Social Security benefits is that, in contrast to savings in a 401(k) or IRA, they never run out (until surviving children become adults). Furthermore, in contrast to a pension, they are fully portable between jobs. And in contrast to both 401(k)s/IRAs and the vast majority of pensions, benefits are protected from erosion by inflation, through the COLA.

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Isn’t Social Security the cause of our large federal deficit?

Not at all. Social Security has its own dedicated revenue stream described above, so it cannot contribute a penny to the federal deficit.

Hey Merrill, if this is true, not a single penny came out of the general fund to pay social security benefits. Right?

Watch. The coward won't answer because he's not capable of thinking for himself.

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Home Why are Social Security’s protections irreplaceable?
Why are Social Security’s protections irreplaceable?

The best part about Social Security benefits is that, in contrast to savings in a 401(k) or IRA, they never run out (until surviving children become adults). Furthermore, in contrast to a pension, they are fully portable between jobs. And in contrast to both 401(k)s/IRAs and the vast majority of pensions, benefits are protected from erosion by inflation, through the COLA.

 

SocialSecurityWorks-Logo.gif

Home Is Social Security going bankrupt?
Is Social Security going bankrupt?

Social Security can never go bankrupt. Nearly all (97 percent) of its income comes from the contributions of workers and employers, or interest on these contributions. Hence as long as there are workers in America, Social Security will have income. Even if Congress were to take no action, Social Security could pay 100% of promised benefits for the next two decades, and more than three-quarters of benefits after that. Around 2033 there will be a modest funding gap requiring modest increases in revenues to guarantee everyone 100% of promised benefits.

 

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SocialSecurityWorks-Logo.gif

Home Is Social Security going bankrupt?
Is Social Security going bankrupt?

Social Security can never go bankrupt. Nearly all (97 percent) of its income comes from the contributions of workers and employers, or interest on these contributions. Hence as long as there are workers in America, Social Security will have income. Even if Congress were to take no action, Social Security could pay 100% of promised benefits for the next two decades, and more than three-quarters of benefits after that. Around 2033 there will be a modest funding gap requiring modest increases in revenues to guarantee everyone 100% of promised benefits.

 

 

According to the most recent Annual Report of the Board of the Social SecurityTrustees, the trust fund's assets are now $2.79 trillion. ... So, bottom line: Social Security is not going broke .... as of august 2016.

 

 

With corporations routinely defaulting on their pension promises, more and more workers must rely on their individual wealth to make up the difference. The stock market collapse at the turn of the millennium wiped out much of the financial wealth of middle class Americans, and the collapse of the housing bubble has wiped out much of their remaining wealth.

 

 

Until 1984, the trust fund was “pay-as-you-go,” meaning current benefits were paid using current tax revenues. In 1984, Congress raised payroll taxes to prepare for the retirement of the baby boom generation. As a result, the Social Security trust fund, which holds government bonds as assets, has been growing. When the baby boomers retire, these bonds will be sold to help pay their retirement benefits.

If the trust fund went to zero, Social Security would simply revert to pay-as-you-go.

The Koch Boys and ALEC started rumors during the days of Reagan/Bush that Social Security was going broke nearly 40 years ago. The estimated date of going broke has been all over the page. One way to further boost Social Security Insurance would be to remove the wage cap which I believe is set at $160,000. Which is to say have contributions based on total gross income which is what the lions share pay as we speak...... only the few are enjoying another loop hole.

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National Review and such are right wing misinformation machines working for the profiteers who will take their cuts right off the top which will leave fewer social security dollars to be spent on the people who invested into SSI. Wall Street was not in the plan originally and should never be part of the plan.

 

Wall Street is only for those who can afford to lose money so my grandfather advised me..... a man who was a wise dude indeed and a player on Wall Street. The money needs to be there when people want to retire ---- no way can reckless and risky Wall Street guarantee any such thing.

 

Social Security Insurance CAN NEVER AFFORD TO LOSE MONEY NEVER!!! Neither can I .... !

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Is it true that the trust fund is just a bunch of government IOUs and therefore worthless?

The trust fund does just contain IOUs, but they're not worthless. If they are, someone should tell that to the very smart and very rich people who bought $475 billion in government bonds last year to finance the deficits President Bush and Congress created, and to the central banks of Japan, China, and many other countries that hold a large share of their assets in U.S. government bonds.

When the trust fund was created in 1935, the law stipulated that any excess revenues coming into the Social Security system must be used to purchase federal government bonds. (At the time, the stock market had just lost over 75% of its value and was understood to be unsafe.) Federal bonds are absolutely safe; the government of the United States has never defaulted on any bond obligation.

--- FAQ's = Most current information = FYI


 

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Just keep posting your lies, merrill.

 

Keep repeating your meme.

 

But the truth about SS is here:

 

http://www.liberalforum.org/index.php?/topic/204015-social-security-is-backed-with-billions-in-govt-bonds/?p=1059708082

 

No wonder you've carefully ignored that post.

 

And as a result, I don't have to post anything else.

 

:D

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