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Bakelite

40 Shot in Chicago over the weekend

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The problem with measuring intelligence is that the tests are based upon White culture. Blacks are every bit as intelligent as Whites, they just don't have the same opportunities and testing advantages as Whites. For example, if you constructed a culturally modified intelligence test for Blacks, they would ace it every time and leave Whites in their dust.

 

That's old information. There are intelligence tests that are completely neutral, that deal mostly with shapes (like shaded or filled in triangles, squares, circles) and numbers.

 

I do believe that you're right that blacks and whites are equally intelligent - when equally motivated. Middle class black kids are typically sufficiently motivated. Poor black kids sometimes have a chip on their shoulder and don't want to be seen "acting white". That's a real cultural problem.

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Motivation is a huge factor. Hopelessness tends to squash motivation.

 

Another big factor is enculturation. I recently watched a documentary where several anthropologists were living with a remote Amazonian tribe and had learned the language. They accompanied several tribesmen on a hunt in the pathless rain forest and quickly became disoriented. When asked how to find the way back to the village, one of the tribesman said to just take note of the trees and then follow those same trees back. An impossible feat for the anthropologists, because after a short time .... All the trees started to look the same.

 

That would have been the tribes-peoples intelligence test, had they been inclined to administer one. And the anthropologists, who, most likely do well on standard IQ tests, would fail miserably.

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Another big factor is enculturation. I recently watched a documentary where several anthropologists were living with a remote Amazonian tribe and had learned the language. They accompanied several tribesmen on a hunt in the pathless rain forest and quickly became disoriented. When asked how to find the way back to the village, one of the tribesman said to just take note of the trees and then follow those same trees back. An impossible feat for the anthropologists, because after a short time .... All the trees started to look the same.

Yup. Identifying differences in trees is important in the rain forest, much less so on a university campus.

 

In developed Western societies, what seems to be important are good verbal communication skills, ability to read and understand, ability to write clearly, strong numeracy, and computer skills.

 

Another important skill is 3D spatial reasoning and 4D space-time reasoning. Someone with those abilities and the above abilities too can go very far in the sciences or engineering.

 

Whether the field is genetic engineering or automotive design or micro-ecology ... the world needs that and will pay big time for it.

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Yup. Identifying differences in trees is important in the rain forest, much less so on a university campus.

 

In developed Western societies, what seems to be important are good verbal communication skills, ability to read and understand, ability to write clearly, strong numeracy, and computer skills.

 

 

They type of mass tree identifications which the tribesmen had mastered is no easy thing to learn. Most of us could probably never learn it as adults but only if we were brought up with people to who it is routine. The encyclopedic knowledge of hunter-gatherers, about the environments in which they live, is the basis of our technological world today.

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The encyclopedic knowledge of hunter-gatherers, about the environments in which they live, is the basis of our technological world today.

I agree that it is difficult, and that it requires intelligence.

 

That knowledge was used to identify and domesticated crops. The basis for modern society, with the economies that result from division of labor, are a direct result of the move away from hunting and gathering to farming.

 

That doesn't minimize the knowledge that came from the hunter-gatherers. Without their understanding of plants and animals, domestication and farming could not have occurred.

 

But that only says: you've got to start somewhere.

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I agree that it is difficult, and that it requires intelligence.

 

That knowledge was used to identify and domesticated crops. The basis for modern society, with the economies that result from division of labor, are a direct result of the move away from hunting and gathering to farming.

 

That doesn't minimize the knowledge that came from the hunter-gatherers. Without their understanding of plants and animals, domestication and farming could not have occurred.

 

But that only says: you've got to start somewhere.

 

That somewhere was the hunter-gatherer stage, which lasted about a million years after modern homo-sapiens evolved. The Nomadic hunting and gathering way of life broke away from earlier species in it's dependence on a vast, pool of complex knowledge for survival ... Knowledge which was passed down by word of mouth, through the generations, over countless campfires ... And tools were not only used, but crafted and carried around for continual re-use ... The first true advanced culture in the animal world.

 

Of course, the very first beginnings of us were primeval, single-celled organisms. But the real beginnings of technology, sentience and complex culture was during the hunter-gatherer stage of human development.

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I agree. It's hard to dispute archeological evidence.

 

Unless you're a religious nut or a pandering Republican. In which case the world is about 6000 years old and it was just like Fred Flintstone using a dinosaur as a shovel in a rock quarry. Or something. :D

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Unless you're a religious nut or a pandering Republican. In which case the world is about 6000 years old and it was just like Fred Flintstone using a dinosaur as a shovel in a rock quarry. Or something. :D

 

Many really do think dinosaurs and humans co-existed. And others insist that the fossil record is all a hoax.

 

In one of his SciFi novels, Isaac Asimov had a plot that depicted a world on which most of the population lived in gleeful ignorance and publicly worshiped this or that god. The protagonist, a planet-hopping freighter pilot expressed to a friend that he believed this was the condition of most of humankind and that only a very few enlightened souls would ever carry the torch of progress.

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Really religious people say that everyone believes in god when they're dying.

 

I say that everyone eventually becomes an atheist. One second after you die, you stop believing in any god. :)

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And like most major American cities it's segregated along residential lines with blacks in concentrated poverty.

absolutely. It's a myth that it is a black morality issue. In fact, it has nothing to do with the color of anyone's skin. Growing up not too far from Detroit I knew all white areas that were worn down and subject to immense poverty and believe me those areas were just as dangerous as any poor black neighborhood. But this is taken from my own personal account or knowledge. But still it should be more than obvious. It comes down to having a low level of self respect which comes from poverty, lack of education, and lack of any hope towards prosperity.

 

When you have fewer and fewer resources where people can reach out to help teach someone how to develop any kind of good skill it becomes extremely difficult to break the cycle. And this should be first and foremost our main objective as a country. It's way past due.

 

Peace!

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