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Crime and Punishment


TheOldBarn
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This Dostoyevsky novel had a huge impact on me. I read it when I first got the courage to go to college. The main character is actually quite intelligent however he has an issue with how he equates good from bad. There is something in him however that troubles his conscious more than just being found out after the terrible things he did. It is kind of like hell, or the idea of hell that was never really defined for me enough by the catholic church. Yet, forgiveness is part of the catholic way, that is if you accept your sins first, you have hope for forgiveness, without that, you reel in a self induced agony overtime, at least for the most part.

 

First, why is the crime perpetrated in the first place, and what is the logic behind such a terrible act. What was the final outcome the criminal wished for to that end, or did they even try to think through their actions or rationalize exactly how they would justify it and remain sane in their own mind.

 

Implicit in our criminal punishment system is a whole big bowl of unfairness to begin with, and then we throw rehabilitation out the window completely and in many ways make people worse than they were to begin with.

 

And all of this erodes everyone's sense of right from wrong. It creates a system of unfairness and a get what you can for yourself identity, instead of a culture of folk who foster a more civil prosperous society that works to everyone's benefit.

 

We are all human after all. Even the smartest among us has issues they need to work through. We all need people who can help us and small acts can and matter. If you are in a long line and see someone who has a physical ailment or is very old, step up and be a citizen. Kindly help them to the front of the line.

 

If you're in say the emergency ward and someone has an ailment that is much worse than yours, point it out, put them first. If you came from the battle field, like some of our soldiers, and you are shot in the arm, be like they are, they put their buddies who are worse off in front even though they are in a high degree of pain.

 

If you see a neighbor struggling to fix their car and you know how to fix it, why the heck not step up and help educate them? How did you learn to do that, if you struggled once at something, and you finally figure it out you are likely a good teacher, so teach. It will make you feel good if you do.

 

It's common sense, right?

 

Well to me it's the same when we look at our criminal justice system. Especially when you understand the socioeconomic aspects that are likely involved. It is shameful that we don't.

 

 

Peace!

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You draw excellent conclusions from Dostoevsky about helping the less fortunate and our fellow man in general. It's a lesson of tolerance and forgiveness that reminds me of my Catholic upbringing as well. I wish I'd read your post before my horrible holiday with my family, but alas, I forgot a few of the lessons from the book at the time.

 

Add to this the idea that everyone around me seems to be a large part of the "get what you can for yourself" society and they've now commercialized Christmas. Family members complaining their gifts aren't expensive and lavish enough while giving $10 gift cards to Walmart in return (way to know me and what I like there sis!)... what a joke.

 

I always hold the door, help stranded motorists, etc. My family... not so much. Even around the holidays. It's really hard not to get pissed off about it actually, but people are just people, flaws and all.

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Welcome to the forum morganj:

 

Years ago, I read about 2/3 through Crime and Punishment. It just got too painful, for a work of fiction, reading about the protagonist's self-destruction. The murder, the abuse. So I guess I unwittingly deprived myself of the moral of the story.

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Welcome to the forum morganj:

 

Years ago, I read about 2/3 through Crime and Punishment. It just got too painful, for a work of fiction, reading about the protagonist's self-destruction. The murder, the abuse. So I guess I unwittingly deprived myself of the moral of the story.

The moral comes from more than the end. But the end is highly significant as ... well, I'm not sure I should give it away. Let's just say that the main character in a large way punished himself immensely and voluntarily admitted his crimes. He much later found something out that is quite profound / grace or the truth about love if you will. Following a system that is horrid is not a good thing. Sometimes there are good folks who see this system from the inside and try to make a difference for the betterment of all.

 

Peace!

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Well Bludog, what is at the heart of the novel is how people are treated or thought to be of a certain value depending on their class or social strata in society. In this way the main character justifies his original crime, and because of circumstances he did not foresee, he kills another person he did not intend to kill. He justified that by looking at the classes of society and the value that people represent to society. And later he understands this was wrong; even before he finally does admit to his crimes, he becomes sickened by his outlook regarding class somehow. The people who are on the lower rung of society that he continually encounters, as he begins to see himself as one of them after his crime, help to illustrate these visions he has.

 

Only after losing his belief about the lower class in society does he begin to see how wrong he was, that he did in fact commit a horrible crime and as such deserves to be punished. This frees him. It gives him relief, a freedom if you will. Ironically, it restores his faith in humankind, and he accepts punishment and love comes along and releases him from pain. In a nutshell it becomes a total 180 degree turnabout between what is good, and what is evil.

 

Dostoyevsky uses Rodion as an arrogant intellectual to point out what social structures do to those stuck in poverty with no hope. He uses him in the hope that folks who have more privilege can begin to understand the plight of the poor.

 

 

You know, I'm writing this from memory. I read that long book so long ago. It's one of the first great books of literature I picked up all on my own. The critique is my own, and I cried a lot when I read it. I was never a criminal, by that I mean, I never stole or tried to harm anyone, likely because of my large family. However I came from a marginally lower middle class, some might even say kind of poor family. Always always, I wondered about the privilege some have because it affects your own self worth. At least it did for me.

 

Peace!

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Welcome to the forum morganj:

 

Years ago, I read about 2/3 through Crime and Punishment. It just got too painful, for a work of fiction, reading about the protagonist's self-destruction. The murder, the abuse. So I guess I unwittingly deprived myself of the moral of the story.

Thank you. *Bows*

 

I spent far to long debating cons and everyone else under the sun in college to let them fuck with me now.

 

Well Bludog, what is at the heart of the novel is how people are treated or thought to be of a certain value depending on their class or social strata in society. In this way the main character justifies his original crime, and because of circumstances he did not foresee, he kills another person he did not intend to kill. He justified that by looking at the classes of society and the value that people represent to society. And later he understands this was wrong; even before he finally does admit to his crimes, he becomes sickened by his outlook regarding class somehow. The people who are on the lower rung of society that he continually encounters, as he begins to see himself as one of them after his crime, help to illustrate these visions he has.

 

Only after losing his belief about the lower class in society does he begin to see how wrong he was, that he did in fact commit a horrible crime and as such deserves to be punished. This frees him. It gives him relief, a freedom if you will. Ironically, it restores his faith in humankind, and he accepts punishment and love comes along and releases him from pain. In a nutshell it becomes a total 180 degree turnabout between what is good, and what is evil.

 

Dostoyevsky uses Rodion as an arrogant intellectual to point out what social structures do to those stuck in poverty with no hope. He uses him in the hope that folks who have more privilege can begin to understand the plight of the poor.

 

 

You know, I'm writing this from memory. I read that long book so long ago. It's one of the first great books of literature I picked up all on my own. The critique is my own, and I cried a lot when I read it. I was never a criminal, by that I mean, I never stole or tried to harm anyone, likely because of my large family. However I came from a marginally lower middle class, some might even say kind of poor family. Always always, I wondered about the privilege some have because it affects your own self worth. At least it did for me.

 

Peace!

I appreciate your honesty. I was a "criminal". You were not. That's okay. I won't go into detail, but it's common for transgender people to have to steal to eat. I never harmed anyone though, so we have that in common.

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Steal to eat????

 

There is plenty of food in this world for everyone to eat. The only reason there is starvation is because people intentionally set up the society to create starvation. People are being starved on purpose. So it is possible to steal something that might rightfully be considered yours to begin with?

 

Yes, I have had people break into my house and take food. They took a bag of potatoes and some boxed and canned goods. I did not call the police nor report it. I suggest if they really needed those things they could have them. There were other things in my home they did not take. Nor did they make a mess.

 

I suggest that creating a system whereby people starve when not necessary is a very significant crime. If we can change the system we should.

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