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Trump officially wins popular vote.... Sorry liberals.


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Oh you may need to wait a few days to see it on wikipedia or google , but the final count was released by the government.

 

CxG6UzRVQAEuNDg.jpg

 

This was the data liberals were celebrating a few days ago:

TRUMP:
47%
60,350,241
HILLARY:
48%
60,981,118

 

 

Its wrong. Its going to need to be updated.

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Yeah, except he didn't.

 

Can you guys ever be honest about anything? Anything at all?

 

http://www.snopes.com/2016/11/13/who-won-the-popular-vote/

 

HAHAHAAHAHA.... Snopes eh.... It heartens me to realize liberals will believe their own bullshit even after they have their ass handed to them by reality. How about that Hillary +15 by NBC! HAHAHAHAHAAHAHA...

 

 

ConservativeUprising is some sort of idiot immigrant that is basically here to show how ignorant a troll can be. Nothing he posts can be taken seriously.

 

Like when I said Trump would win and that the election would be close. I said Hillary might win by 1-2% but Trump had a shot to win anyway. Sounds like I knew what I was talking about. I did better than Nate Silver.

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ConservativeUprising is some sort of idiot immigrant that is basically here to show how ignorant a troll can be. Nothing he posts can be taken seriously.

Yours must be considered absolutely true while always physically inaccurate.

 

Now as I saw it there were only 694k separating the two out of 125 million votes cast betwen the two, not counting those voting for Johnson and Stein.. Urban Americans, you aren't the majority even if you make the most noise between elections, control all the market prices, dictate social policy whilke only producing dependents having to be nurtured costs upon those self reliant.

 

How many registered voters voted, was it above 65% even though, I heard, 6 million that voted Obama in 08, didn't show up for hillary in 16.

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Hrc had the machines flipping votes and the filthy bitch still got that ass whooped

Lol lol lol lol

Hey dems, next time don't run such a corrupt piece of shit

Lol lol lol

Yep, being a women is "corrupt" in a cons mind. After-all, women are just shit to fagots like you.

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HAHAHAAHAHA.... Snopes eh.... It heartens me to realize liberals will believe their own bullshit even after they have their ass handed to them by reality. How about that Hillary +15 by NBC! HAHAHAHAHAAHAHA...

 

 

 

Like when I said Trump would win and that the election would be close. I said Hillary might win by 1-2% but Trump had a shot to win anyway. Sounds like I knew what I was talking about. I did better than Nate Silver.

I'll make a bet with you. If I can prove that Hilary has the popular vote, You leave the forum for good. If I can't, I'll leave. Bet?

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I'll make a bet with you. If I can prove that Hilary has the popular vote, You leave the forum for good. If I can't, I'll leave. Bet?

The 2008 Democratic presidential primaries were the selection processes by which voters of the Democratic Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 2008 U.S. presidential election. Senator Barack Obama of Illinois was selected as the nominee, becoming the first African-American to secure the presidential nominaton of any major political party in the United States. However, due to a close race between Obama and Senator Hillary Clinton of New York, the contest remained competitive for longer than expected, and neither candidate received enough pledged delegates from state primaries and caucuses to achieve a majority, without endorsements from unpledged delegates (superdelegates).

The presidential primaries actually consisted of both primary elections and caucuses, depending upon what the individual state chose. The goal of the process was to elect the majority of the 4,233 delegates to the 2008 Democratic National Convention, which was held from Sunday, August 25, through Wednesday, August 28, 2008, in Denver, Colorado. To secure the nomination, a candidate needed to receive at least 2,117 votes at the convention—or a simple majority of the 4,233 delegate votes. This total included half-votes from American Samoa, Guam, the United States Virgin Islands, and Democrats Abroad, as well as "superdelegates", party leaders and elected officials who were not chosen through a primary or caucus. The race was further complicated by a controversy over the scheduling of the Michigan and Florida state primaries, which had been scheduled earlier than party rules permitted, affecting the number of delegates that those states sent to the national convention.

Although Obama led in the delegate count, Clinton won the popular vote.[2] However, the popular vote tally from most news organizations did not include Iowa, Maine, Nevada, and Washington which did not release popular vote results, but it did include Florida, which neither Clinton nor Obama contested, and Michigan, where Obama withdrew from the ballot yet Clinton did not, due to the Democratic National Committee's penalizing of those two states for violating party rules. [3] Nevertheless, regardless of how votes were counted, the candidates' totals were within less than one percent of each other.[4]

Obama received enough superdelegate endorsements on June 3 to claim that he had secured the simple majority of delegates necessary to win the nomination, and Clinton conceded the nomination four days later.[5][6] Obama was nominated on the first ballot, at the August convention. He went on to win the general election, and became the 44th President of the United States on January 20, 2009. Clinton went on to serve as Obama's Secretary of State for his first term.

 

 

 

 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOPS

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Of course conservativeupchucking lacks the balls to stand by his lie.

 

http://interactives.ap.org/2016/general-election/?SITE=APQA

 

The 2008 Democratic presidential primaries were the selection processes by which voters of the Democratic Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 2008 U.S. presidential election. Senator Barack Obama of Illinois was selected as the nominee, becoming the first African-American to secure the presidential nominaton of any major political party in the United States. However, due to a close race between Obama and Senator Hillary Clinton of New York, the contest remained competitive for longer than expected, and neither candidate received enough pledged delegates from state primaries and caucuses to achieve a majority, without endorsements from unpledged delegates (superdelegates).

The presidential primaries actually consisted of both primary elections and caucuses, depending upon what the individual state chose. The goal of the process was to elect the majority of the 4,233 delegates to the 2008 Democratic National Convention, which was held from Sunday, August 25, through Wednesday, August 28, 2008, in Denver, Colorado. To secure the nomination, a candidate needed to receive at least 2,117 votes at the convention—or a simple majority of the 4,233 delegate votes. This total included half-votes from American Samoa, Guam, the United States Virgin Islands, and Democrats Abroad, as well as "superdelegates", party leaders and elected officials who were not chosen through a primary or caucus. The race was further complicated by a controversy over the scheduling of the Michigan and Florida state primaries, which had been scheduled earlier than party rules permitted, affecting the number of delegates that those states sent to the national convention.

Although Obama led in the delegate count, Clinton won the popular vote.[2] However, the popular vote tally from most news organizations did not include Iowa, Maine, Nevada, and Washington which did not release popular vote results, but it did include Florida, which neither Clinton nor Obama contested, and Michigan, where Obama withdrew from the ballot yet Clinton did not, due to the Democratic National Committee's penalizing of those two states for violating party rules. [3] Nevertheless, regardless of how votes were counted, the candidates' totals were within less than one percent of each other.[4]

Obama received enough superdelegate endorsements on June 3 to claim that he had secured the simple majority of delegates necessary to win the nomination, and Clinton conceded the nomination four days later.[5][6] Obama was nominated on the first ballot, at the August convention. He went on to win the general election, and became the 44th President of the United States on January 20, 2009. Clinton went on to serve as Obama's Secretary of State for his first term.

 

 

 

 

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOPS

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I want to see if he takes the bet. BTW, Does anyone care what 123 is posting? I have his stupid ass on ignore.

I always love when liberals claim to have someone on ignore, but can't ignore them.

I'll make a bet with you. If I can prove that Hilary has the popular vote, You leave the forum for good. If I can't, I'll leave. Bet?

Are you going to allow or disallow all the fraudulent votes from the dead, absentee fraud and illegal aliens?

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63BlackSheepDM_468x290jpg.jpg63BlackSheepDM_468x290jpg.jpg

SHHHHHHH DONT TELL THE LIBERAL LEMMINGS THAT HUSSEIN THE MUSLIM STOLE THE DEMONCRAT PRIMARY ELECTION FROM KILLARY THE CROOK......SHHHHHHHHH.....WE DONT NEED MORE TEARS RIGHT NOW.

 

 

 

The 2008 Democratic presidential primaries were the selection processes by which voters of the Democratic Party chose its nominee for President of the United States in the 2008 U.S. presidential election. Senator Barack Obama of Illinois was selected as the nominee, becoming the first African-American to secure the presidential nominaton of any major political party in the United States. However, due to a close race between Obama and Senator Hillary Clinton of New York, the contest remained competitive for longer than expected, and neither candidate received enough pledged delegates from state primaries and caucuses to achieve a majority, without endorsements from unpledged delegates (superdelegates).

The presidential primaries actually consisted of both primary elections and caucuses, depending upon what the individual state chose. The goal of the process was to elect the majority of the 4,233 delegates to the 2008 Democratic National Convention, which was held from Sunday, August 25, through Wednesday, August 28, 2008, in Denver, Colorado. To secure the nomination, a candidate needed to receive at least 2,117 votes at the convention—or a simple majority of the 4,233 delegate votes. This total included half-votes from American Samoa, Guam, the United States Virgin Islands, and Democrats Abroad, as well as "superdelegates", party leaders and elected officials who were not chosen through a primary or caucus. The race was further complicated by a controversy over the scheduling of the Michigan and Florida state primaries, which had been scheduled earlier than party rules permitted, affecting the number of delegates that those states sent to the national convention.

Although Obama led in the delegate count, Clinton won the popular vote.[2] However, the popular vote tally from most news organizations did not include Iowa, Maine, Nevada, and Washington which did not release popular vote results, but it did include Florida, which neither Clinton nor Obama contested, and Michigan, where Obama withdrew from the ballot yet Clinton did not, due to the Democratic National Committee's penalizing of those two states for violating party rules. [3] Nevertheless, regardless of how votes were counted, the candidates' totals were within less than one percent of each other.[4]

Obama received enough superdelegate endorsements on June 3 to claim that he had secured the simple majority of delegates necessary to win the nomination, and Clinton conceded the nomination four days later.[5][6] Obama was nominated on the first ballot, at the August convention. He went on to win the general election, and became the 44th President of the United States on January 20, 2009. Clinton went on to serve as Obama's Secretary of State for his first term.

 

liberals-waaah.jpg

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