Jump to content

shintao...you have listening to too much pussy riot


Recommended Posts

That music is getting to your head !

 

FRIENDLY REMINDER MACK - STAY OFF THE LIBERAL ONLY THREAD IN NHB.

I could have swore the ADM said that thread was open to everyone.

 

So now your saying ultraliberals need a safety room and a thread of thier own ?

 

http://www.liberalforum.org/index.php?/topic/200268-new-video-by-pussy-riot-make-america-great-again/?hl=%2Bpussy+%2Briot

 

edit%20drunk%20on%20pc_zpskedmkdw5.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That music is getting to your head !

 

 

I could have swore the ADM said that thread was open to everyone.

 

So now your saying ultraliberals need a safety room and a thread of thier own ?

 

 

There has been no change in that rule from Administration. You have your con room groping sexual perverts - enjoy it!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

shintao is a man convicted of smashing his conservatives friends PC. He escapes from the nut house in order to prove his innocence even tho he is really guilty. shintao finds that his features are too well known, and is forced to seek some illicit backroom clown make up. The dull rehorrtic part of the story is told from a ultraliberals-eye-view, with us seeing the clown for the first time as he starts to recuperate from the operation in the apartment of a sympathetic young artist (played by Zaro) for whom he soon finds affection. But what shintao really is after is the passwords to Donald Trumps emails and nothing will stop him from getting them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Between 1880 and 1918, W C Fields lived with his parents, James and Kate Felton Dukenfield, in at least 9 different houses in Philly. All of those houses are gone now except for one, 3923 N Marshall St.

 

W. C. Fields' father, James L Dukenfield was born in Sheffield, England in 1841 to John and Anne Dukenfield. In 1854, John and three of his sons emigrated to Philadelphia. James and the rest of the family joined them on January 2, 1857. John worked as a combmaker. At first they lived at 1248 Howard Street (Howard and Thompson). In 1859 they moved to 915 N 2nd Street (2nd and Poplar) and in 1860 they moved to Norris between Front and Amber. By age 18, James was selling produce from a huckster wagon. At the start of the Civil War, James joined Company M of the 72nd Pa Infantry Regiment. On June 27, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, he was shot in the left hand, losing 2 fingers and a part of a third. He was given a medical discharge from the Army which probably saved his life. Three months later, half of his Regiment was killed at Antietam (the bloodiest day of the war).

 

After his release from the Army, James again worked as a huckster. He boarded with a family that lived near 3rd and Diamond. In 1874, he took a job as a bartender and moved to 2132 Market St. On May 18, 1879, James married Kate Felton at the Memorial ME Church at 8th and Cumberland. James and Kate moved to 6320 Woodland Ave. James managed a hotel in nearby Darby where their first child, Claude William (later reversed to William Claude) Dukenfield was born on January 29, 1880. After Claude, they had 5 more children: Walter, Elsie, Adele, Leroy and a stillborn daughter (Oct 29, 1891).

 

By 1882, the Dukenfields lived at 2552 Germantown Ave (Germantown and Huntingdon). Once again, James worked as a bartender. In 1884 they moved to 929 W Somerset Street (Somerset and Germantown). In 1888, James quit bartending and went back to being a huckster. They moved just around the corner to 2803 Germantown Ave. After the death of their stillborn daughter in 1891, they moved to 92 Goodman Street (11th and Ontario). Young Claude dropped out of school in 1890 and was expected to help James on the produce wagon. Claude hated selling produce though, and often quarreled with his father. James was a stern man and he would sometimes give Claude a beating. In 1893, through the intercession of his Grandmom Felton, Claude was allowed to seek other employment. He first worked as a clerk in a cigar shop and then as a runner at Strawbridge and Clothier. He didn't enjoy those jobs either and by 1894, Claude found himself back selling produce.

 

To kill his boredom, Claude learned how to juggle fruit. This drove James nuts. One day he caught Claude juggling some oranges. He yelled at Claude to knock it off and as he started towards the boy, he stepped on a rake which smacked him in the face. Claude couldn't keep from laughing which infuriated his father. James chased him down the street shouting that he was never to return home. Claude spent the next few months living on the streets but it was never as bad as he later embellished after he had achieved fame. His friends would bring him food and when the weather was bad, he stayed with Grandmom Felton at 921 Sterner Street (9th and Lehigh). By the time winter set in, Claude made up with his dad and moved back home.

 

Claude then took a job in an oyster saloon. When that didn't work out he started selling newspapers, which left him plenty of time to hang out in a pool hall. Claude became quite proficient with a cue stick, a talent that he would later use both on the stage and in films. Grandmom Felton disapproved of the pool hall and found Claude a job delivering ice. In the Spring of 1896, Claude appeared in a skit at a church picnic. He loved the experience and decided that he wanted to become a performer. He began to appear at local venues and in the summer of 1897, he got a job in a circus near Norristown juggling for $5 a week, billing himself as W. C. Dukenfield. This led to a juggling gig at Atlantic City in 1898. Claude proved to be a popular act and in 1899 he joined the Keith Vaudeville Circuit (as W. C. Fields). He performed as a tramp juggler earning $18 a week. He went over huge in New York and was asked to join the Orpheum Circuit which spanned both coasts.

 

Although he was frequently on tour, W C Fields considered Philly his home. He advertised himself in nearly all of the Philadelphia City Directories from 1902 until 1918. Whenever he wasn't touring, he always came home to his parents. In 1897, the family lived at 25 Rising Sun Lane (Rising Sun Ave between Goodman and Old York Road). In 1898 they moved to 3911 N Marshall Street (Marshall and Pike).

 

While on tour, W C fell in love with a chorus girl, Harriet Hughes. They married in San Francisco on April 8, 1900. Harriet joined W C's act as his lovely assistant. They received rave revues in every city they visited and the tour was extended to Europe. When W C arrived in England during the Summer of 1904, he sent money home so that his father could join him for a 2 month visit (James left England at age 15 and had never returned). While W C was touring in Europe, his wife Harriet was back in Manhattan where she gave birth to their son, W C Fields Jr on July 28, 1904. When W C returned to America, Harriet told him that she wanted them to settle down and raise a family in one town. W C just couldn't agree to that. He loved his work. They separated in 1907 but never divorced. W C sent her a check every week for the next 39 years.

 

W C's parents moved to 615 Pike St (Pike and Marshall) in 1903. In 1906 they moved around the corner to their longtime home at 3923 N Marshall St. In 1908, James retired from the produce business. Every week, W C sent his mother $10. I know that doesn't sound like a lot but it probably covered their rent and part of their grocery bill. W C also employed his brother Walter, who became his assistant after Harriet left the act.

 

By 1910, W C was being billed as the greatest comedy juggler in the world. At $450 a week he was one of the highest paid performers in Vaudeville. W C loved to read and always toured with a trunk of books. He was also a top notch cartoonist and had sketchbooks filled with the people and places in his life.

 

W C's father became ill in January of 1913. James Dukenfield died of bladder cancer on April 15, 1913.

W C was touring in Ohio and Massachusetts during his father's illness but managed to be back in Philly by the end of March. In May, he took some bookings in Philly so he could spend time with his mother and siblings. Later that year he once again toured England. He was invited to perform at Buckingham Palace for King George V. After the performance, the King asked to meet W C and shook his hand.

 

The year 1915 was huge for W C. He got rave revues performing new material, billing himself as "The Silent Humorist". He made his first one reel movie, The Pool Shark, and he was hired to perform in the Ziegfeld Follies on Broadway. For the next ten years, W C spent most of his time in New York but he did come home regularly to visit his mother. The last time that he listed himself in the Philadelphia City Directory was 1918. After the 1921 Broadway season, W C was let go by Ziegfeld. He was angry with him for instigating an actor's strike (after an actress was unjustly fired by Ziegfeld). For the 1922 season, W C went with George White's Scandals, the rival show of The Follies. In 1923, he was given a lead roll in the Broadway play Poppy, which was a smashing success. He was back with Ziegfeld in the Spring of 1925 when he was asked to come to Hollywood to reprise his role in the film version of Poppy (retitled Sally of the Sawdust). In the June 1925 issue of Vanity Fair, W C was asked what he wanted as his epitaph. His reply was "I would rather be living in Philadelphia".

 

W C Field's mother, Kate Dukenfield did not live to see her son's first feature film. Three weeks before it was released, she passed away from liver cancer on July 13, 1925. She had continued to live at 3923 N Marshall until 1924 when ill health forced her to move in with her daughter, Adele Dukenfield Smith who lived near Oaklyn, New Jersey. Kate was buried in the family plot at Greenwood Cemetery at Adams and Arrott. Buried there are: Thomas and Anne Felton (WC's maternal grandparents) on the left. U S Grant Felton (Kate's brother) and Kate are in the center and on the right are James Dukenfield (WC's father) and WC's stillborn sister. W C bought his parents a headstone. Under his father's name it says "Great Scout". Under his mother's name it says "A Sweet Old Soul".

 

After his mother's funeral, W C never returned to Philadelphia, though he did keep in contact with his siblings. Between 1925 and 1941, he made about 3 dozen movies, at least a third of them are considered today to be classics. He also found popularity on the radio in the late 30's, sparring with Charlie McCarthy (Edgar Bergen's dummy). W C had become a heavy drinker and his health declined rapidly after 1941 He died on Christmas Day 1946.

 

His estate was worth $772,000, the bulk of it going to his brother Walter, his sister Adele and his longtime girlfriend Carlotta Monti. His wife Harriet (they never divorced) contested the will in court. She had moved to California in 1938 and under State law was entitled to half. After an 8 year battle in the courts, Harriet was awarded $335,000. Carlotta received $25,000 plus $25 a week for life. Walter received $5,000 and $75 a week for life. Adele received $5,000 and $60 a week for life. His younger siblings Leroy and Elsie each got just $500. W C Fields died an avowed atheist. I have no doubt that right now, he really would rather be living in Philadelphia.

researched and written by Bob McNulty October 26, 2014. for more stories go to:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There has been no change in that rule from Administration. You have your con room groping sexual perverts - enjoy it!!!

LAFFIN!!

Old Mack is going thru a traumatic withdrawal, not being able to troll or spam the LO room.

What a loser.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...