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Trees


TheOldBarn
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Trees are clearly very important, who wouldn't agree with that statement?

 

Bloomberg, who in a lot of ways is very cool, actually commissioned a study to find out the true economic benefits for planting more Trees in NY City. Trees hold onto water, and in the way they move nutrients they emit through their leaves vapor, an almost invisible water vapor which acts as a natural air conditioner cooling the surrounding environment. Trees also, it has been scientifically demonstrated, reduce stress levels in people. Bloomberg's study found out that for every dollar paid to plant a tree, you get back five.

 

Trees can also help fight against warming caused by climate change in a huge way. This is a very important topic that needs to be understood more to help mitigate some of the damage from climate change that has already been done by humans.

 

 

Peace!

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Trees should be planted everywhere practical. They should be in every urban and rural environment,, as fast as people can plant them.

 

But trees are being decimated both in the deciduous forests of temperate zones, the northern tiaga, and the tropical rainforests. They are being cut down for lumber everywhere. In the tropics, they are being cut down for the most inefficient food of all; Beef. And also to make way for palm oil plantations, used for chips and junk food, the world over.

 

Whatever happened to groups like the Arbor Day Foundation? On a hopeful note, there seems to be a really big, growing awareness of the value of trees.

 

Trees for the Future
www.treesforthefuture.org/
Trees for the Future
Trees for the Future is a non-profit organization initiating and supporting agroforestry self-help projects in cooperation with groups and individuals in developing ...
Plant a Billion Trees: Home
www.plantabillion.org/
This year, help us raise $123 million for the Plant A Billion Trees campaign. ... The Nature Conservancy is a nonprofit, tax-exempt charitable organization under ...
One Tree Planted
onetreeplanted.org/
We are a non-profit 501c3 organization focused on planting trees throughout the world. One Dollar plants one tree.
American Forests: Home
www.americanforests.org/
American Forests
Nonprofit conservation organization aims to protect, restore and enhance the natural capital of trees and forests. Includes information on membership, news, ...
Do you plant, care for, or advocate for trees? Join today to get ... in Your State. A new resource to help you locate the tree organizations and people in your state.
[PDF]tree-planting scams & deceptions - Plant-It 2020
www.plantit2020.org/pdf/Scams_Short_Edited.pdf
Version one of the scam is when the tree-planting organization claims that for every ... planting organization to pay another group to purchase and plant the trees ...
Arbor Day Foundation
We inspire people to plant, nurture, and celebrate trees. ... largest nonprofit membership organization dedicated to planting trees, with over one million members, ...
Arbor Day Foundation
Buy trees and give a gift of trees through our Trees in Memory and Trees for America ... Find out more about our programs and efforts to plant trees where they're ... Foundation is a 501©(3) nonprofit conservation and education organization.
Organizations | Spirit of Trees
spiritoftrees.org/organizations
An order form on this site allows individuals to “plant a tree online” and help preserve ... Greenpeace is an independent campaigning organization which uses ...
The Fruit Tree Planting Foundation (FTPF) is a unique nonprofit charity ... Our goal is straightforward: to collectively plant 18 billion fruit trees across the world ... "It is vital and absolutely essential to support this fantastic non-profit organization!
  1. Tree Planting Organization‎
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    Agroforestry Program · Trees for the Future · Sustainable Farming · Donate a Tree Today
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Yeah Bludog, I must agree. This dissemination of knowledge like many others is often missed, even when one supplies helpful web links. Recently heard Nader, and Chomsky both discuss the current or lack therein of dissemination regarding public policies practiced over the years. It seems people spend a lot more time becoming specialized in understanding the sport of football, or fancy foot ware than they do about policy. If people would simply devote some of that time which is kind of a waste, on public policy more, and no, it ain't rocket science, the world would be headed on a much more optimal path.

 

No, overall Americans are not in any way dumb, quite the opposite. Relatively speaking, homo sapiens are by definition, naturally quite brilliant, almost amazingly so. And with the advents of thousands of years we have incredible technology that has delivered amazing results, yet, only to a weird and very strange odd point that has led to some very disastrous events.

 

Things we just can't seem to figure out have already been figured out for us. We seem bent, perplexed, even tormented, almost as though we have been led down the wrong path, yet we're not sure which way we should go. And its almost the very same path we've been led down so many times before, is all we can think, and so it makes us feel lost.

 

Peace!

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A little light entertainment for tree lovers:

 

This is absolutely stunning!

 

https://youtu.be/JmGueWa_k9c

 

http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wil...merged-ireland

 

A 'hidden' forest in the shape of a Celtic cross has emerged in Ireland

 

If you happen to be flying over County Donegal in the republic of Ireland, you may be astonished to see a beautiful arrangement of conifer trees in the shape of a Celtic cross growing on the ground below.

 

“It’s not just cutting patterns in your back garden," Gareth Austin, a gardening columnist for the Donegal Daily said. "This is horticultural engineering – we will be appreciating this for up to the next 70 years."

 

To pull off the beautiful design, measuring 330 feet long by 210 feet wide, two different species of trees were planted. Every autumn, the Celtic trees (likely composed of Eastern white pine) change their hue, while the surrounding species retains its dark green. The display went viral this fall after a particularly dry stretch of months made the colors contrast sharply. Airline passengers couldn't resist posting to social media about the mysterious cross. As shown in the video below, drone pilots quickly followed:

 

 

 

https://youtu.be/JmGueWa_k9c

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I agree with this in principle. However, one thing to bear in mind is that not all trees are not suited to all environments, and can take massive amounts of water to maintain outside of their native habitats. Where specific trees (or any trees) are not naturally occurring, their nearest equivalent should be planted instead. Water-intensive trees in Phoenix, AZ, for example, probably do more environmental harm than good in regards to water consumption. Planting a low-water tree or grasses or brush or cacti would be a better idea.

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I agree with this in principle. However, one thing to bear in mind is that not all trees are not suited to all environments, and can take massive amounts of water to maintain outside of their native habitats. Where specific trees (or any trees) are not naturally occurring, their nearest equivalent should be planted instead. Water-intensive trees in Phoenix, AZ, for example, probably do more environmental harm than good in regards to water consumption. Planting a low-water tree or grasses or brush or cacti would be a better idea.

Agreed. Many people, who moved from high pollen areas because of allergies, were surprised to find people planting grass lawns and large trees. Fortunately, this ending because of water restrictions.

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Yes water restrictions are key in dry environments. In this ultra-Conservative part of the Southwest; the Mojave desert, water restrictions are too few and too weak. Only recently, to my relief, were water courses (large, artificial ponds) banned in our area. Myself and a few others had argued vigorously for this in the past but were shouted down by far more numerous, indignant, Republican homeowners. But in many public and private areas green lawns and trees are still kept artificially alive with scarce water that should never have been piped in from local aquifers.

 

On the sane side, it is not uncommon for homeowners to opt for gravel and locally occurring cacti and desert flowers instead of lawns and deciduous trees, palms or pines, which could not survive by themselves in this relatively arid setting.

 

But in non-desert areas, where trees have been mostly logged out, reforestation is key to a healthier environment. And, in areas where they grow naturally, urban settings should be provided with as many trees as practical.

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There are many things that can be done. One big thing is that cities should be planting locally native trees whenever possible instead of imported ornamentals. (By imported, I mean from anything not locally native or formerly native.) They also need to plant diverse species. That way if one species is attacked by parasites/disease/insects, all the trees won't die. We also need to be stricter about importing wood or anything made of or packed in wood. Anything showing some sort of infestation should be refused. Funds should be set aside to combat diseases in trees as well. Forests should be replanted, and so should grasslands and wetlands wherever possible. Green corridors should be planted. Also, for goodness' sake, we have to find what's going on with the bees. All of these things will help trees, will help all plants, will help animals, and help the environment.

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Agreed. Many people, who moved from high pollen areas because of allergies, were surprised to find people planting grass lawns and large trees. Fortunately, this ending because of water restrictions.

certainly LoreD - careful planning is everything.

 

Peace!

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