Jump to content

Hurricane Matthew is super strong - because of climate cha


Recommended Posts

Although the total number of hurricane type storms around the world has stayed about the same so far, there has been an increase in the numbers and intensities of the most powerful storms.....and this increase is directly linked to the warmer sea surface temperatures caused by global warming. This, along with sea level rise, is increasing the power and penetration inland of the highly destructive hurricane driven storm surges. As the coastal areas of Georgia and the Carolinas are about to experience. This will just get worse in the coming years and decades as sea levels rise much more and sea surface temperatures continue to rise, driven by the accelerating human caused, CO2-driven global warming the Earth is experiencing.

 

Hurricane Matthew is super strong  --  because of climate change

"Category 4 and 5 hurricanes could double or triple in the coming decades," expert warns.

Think Progress

Dr. Joe Romm

1*Zte4q-2Ajn6pS81Ty-xNeQ.jpeg

Hurricane Matthew, October 4 (via NASA)

Hurricane Matthew is slowly approaching the East Coast where it is expected to wreak havoc with storm surge, wind, and rain. Matthew has already set a number of records  -- and global warming is giving it a boost.

 

Hurricanes "extract heat energy from the ocean to convert it to the power of wind, and the warmer the ocean is, the stronger a hurricane can get if all other conditions that it needs to exist are present," meteorologist and former hurricane hunter Jeff Masters explained last month on Living on Earth. "So, scientists are confident that as we continue to heat up the oceans, we're going to see more of these high-end perfect storms."

 

Case in point, as meteorologist Philip Klotzbach has noted:

  • Matthew set a new record as the longest lived Category 4 (or higher) Atlantic hurricane in October  --  84 hours.
  • By Monday, it had already "generated the most accumulated cyclone energy" of any Atlantic hurricane ever recorded in the eastern Caribbean.
  • As a result, the 2016 hurricane season has "already generated the most accumulated cyclone energy in the Atlantic in October since 2005" (the year of Katrina, Rita, and Wilma).
Let's look at some of the latest climate science. One 2013 paper found that "since 1975 there has been a substantial and observable regional and global increase in the proportion of Category 45 hurricanes of 2530 percent per °C of anthropogenic global warming." Another 2013 paper concluded that "dramatic changes in the frequency distribution of lifetime maximum intensity (LMI) have occurred in the North Atlantic," and the stronger hurricanes "have become more intense."

 

In other words, warming oceans create stronger hurricanes, like the one we're seeing now.

We just lived through the hottest summer in recorded history

And possibly the hottest in "thousands of years." - thinkprogress.org

Matthew spun up from a tropical storm to a Category 5 superstorm in an alarming 36 hours. The latest research says this is also a result of global warming. "Storms are intensifying at a much more rapid pace than they used to 25 years back," explained the author of a 2012 study. "They are getting stronger more quickly and also [to a] higher category. The intensity as well as the rate of intensity is increasing."

 

A 2015 study, "A climatological study of the effect of sea-surface temperature on North Atlantic hurricane intensification," found a statistically significant relationship between higher intensification values and higher sea surface temperature [sST] values. "On average, mean intensification increases by 16 percent for every 1°C increase in mean SST."

 

This warming-driven trend toward more rapid intensification [RI] is very worrisome. "The vast majority (79 percent) of major storms are RI storms," and "the most intense storms are those that undergo RI," according to a 2016 study.

 

The latest storm tracks for superstorm Matthew have it threatening the southeast coast.

 

1*0KRtcSqoukUoB0D3JqLbcg.jpeg

 

Global warming makes all of these dangerous impacts more destructive for superstorms like Sandy and Matthew. For instance, as leading climatologist Kevin Trenberth has explained, "Owing to higher SSTs from human activities, the increased water vapor in the atmosphere leads to 5 to 10 percent more rainfall and increases the risk of flooding." He elaborates on that here.

 

More concerning is that warming-driven sea level rise makes storm surges more destructive. A 2012 study found that "the 600-mile stretch of coastline from North Carolina to Massachusetts is experiencing [sea level rise] rates that are nearly three to four times higher than the global average, a trend that may continue during the coming decades."

 

Another 2012 study found that landfalling hurricanes cause the biggest storm surges, that hurricanes with the biggest storm surges caused the most destruction, and that Katrina-sized surges "have been twice as frequent in warm years compared with cold years."

 

A 2013 paper, "Projected Atlantic Hurricane Surge Threat from Rising Temperatures," found that the most extreme storm surge events "are especially sensitive to temperature changes, and we estimate a doubling of Katrina-magnitude events associated with the warming over the 20th century." The study concludes, "We have probably crossed the threshold where Katrina magnitude hurricane surges are more likely caused by global warming than not."

 

1*fxO5UfKHB_pSCUj4CX_wPg.jpeg

Bloomberg Businessweek cover story Sandys many links to global warming

 

While we aren't seeing more total hurricanes, we are seeing more of the Category 4 or 5 super-hurricanes, the ones that historically have done the most damage and destroyed entire coastal cities. We're also seeing a sharp rise in the most damaging storm surges, whereby even a Category 1 hurricane (such as Sandy) can cause unprecedented damage.

We're In A 'Hurricane Drought'? Tell That To Victims Of Sandy, Irene And Ike.

Media pushes meme that ignores some of our worst superstorms. - thinkprogress.org

On our current path of unrestricted carbon pollution, NOAA researchers have determined that parts of the East Coast would see Sandy-level storm surges every year by mid-century. One tropical cyclone expert just warned, "Category 4 and 5 hurricanes could double or triple in the coming decades."

 

We simply cannot cut carbon pollution fast enough.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

pg ... you really are an IDIOT.


Although the total number of hurricane type storms around the world has stayed about the same so far, there has been an increase in the numbers and intensities of the most powerful storms.


And a LIAR too.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

pg ... you really are an IDIOT.

And a LIAR too.

Be a climate denier still clinging to the last vestiges of the GW denier movement.

Some day he'll be on top of his roof with the flooding waters all around him shaking his fist at the sky still insisting," There's no global warming I tell ya. It's all a hoax. Rush was right. "

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've have hurricanes for hundreds of years.....

 

I wonder what caused them

⬆️⬆️⬆️⬆️⬆️⬆️

Stupidity speaks!

 

Has anyone ever claimed that there were no hurricanes before AGW came along, bozo?

 

Scientists are talking about an intensification and increase in numbers of the strongest storms due to the increased ocean temperatures, in particular, the increase in sea surface temperatures.

 

Grow a brain and read the OP, numbnuts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

⬆️⬆️⬆️⬆️⬆️⬆️

Stupidity speaks!

 

Has anyone ever claimed that there were no hurricanes before AGW came along, bozo?

 

Scientists are talking about an intensification and increase in numbers of the strongest storms due to the increased ocean temperatures, in particular, the increase in sea surface temperatures.

 

Grow a brain and read the OP, numbnuts.

We've had strong hurricanes for hundreds of years...

 

And somehow this one is special because it happened during the GW scare?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've had strong hurricanes for hundreds of years...

 

And somehow this one is special because it happened during the GW scare?

And there is some hard-core scientific illiteracy....which, I suppose, explains why this dumbass troll still hasn't managed to read or comprehend the OP.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And there is some hard-core scientific illiteracy....which, I suppose, explains why this dumbass troll still hasn't managed to read or comprehend the OP.

Actually it appears some of the worst hurricanes on record happened well before green house gases...

 

Mmmmm...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually it appears some of the worst hurricanes on record happened well before green house gases.. Mmmmm...

It appears that you are severely retarded, Onlyrightwingnuttery, plus very misinformed and kind of delusional.

 

Just a few examples from the real world....

 

Stunning, historic, mind-boggling, and catastrophic: that sums up Hurricane Patricia, which intensified to an incredible-strength Category 5 storm with 200 mph winds overnight. At 2:46 am EDT October 23, 2015 an Air Force hurricane hunter aircraft measured a central pressure of 880 mb in Patricia, making it the most intense hurricane ever observed in the Western Hemisphere. The aircraft measured surface winds of 200 mph, which are the highest reliably-measured surface winds on record for a tropical cyclone, anywhere on the Earth. The previous strongest Eastern Pacific hurricane was Hurricane Linda of 1997, with a pressure of 902 mb (estimated from satellite imagery.) The strongest Atlantic hurricane on record was Hurricane Wilma of 2005, with an 882 mb central pressure. Patricias central pressure dropped an astonishing 100 mb in 24 hours, making it the fastest-intensifying hurricane ever observed in the Western Hemisphere. Patricias intensification rate was very close to the WMO-recognized world record for fasting-intensifying tropical cyclone: 100 millibars in just under 24 hours by Super Typhoon Forrest in the Northwest Pacific in 1983. Patricia is estimated to have intensified 85 knots (100 mph) in 24 hours, from a tropical storm to a Category 5 hurricane.

***

Super typhoon Haiyan, known as Typhoon Yolanda in the Philippines, is believed to be the strongest recorded tropical cyclone ever to make landfall, with wind speeds (at landfall) of 195 mph (314 km/h). Formed on Nov. 3, 2013 and dissipated on the 11th, Haiyan moved northwestward after devastating the Phillipines; Vietnam and south China were also affected. It killed 11,801 and damages worth of US$686 million.

***

In Aug. of 2005, Hurricane Katrina was spotted in Louisiana and Mississippi of the United States. It was formed on the 23rd and lasted for eight days, with peak winds of 175 mph (280 km/h). Being the costliest natural disaster in the history of the U.S., Katrina caused 1,833 fatalities and damages worth US$108 billion (2005 USD).

***

Formed on Aug. 16, 1992, and dissipated on the 28th, Hurricane Andrew hit the southern part of Florida, southwestern part of Louisiana and the northwestern part of the Bahamas, with peak winds of 175 mph (280 km/h). It was one of the costliest hurricanes on the planet, with 26 direct fatalities, 39 indirect ones and damages worth US$26.5 billion (1992 USD).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

More on this topic....

 

Hurricane Matthew looks a lot like the future of climate change

CNN

By John D. Sutter - CNN

Fri October 7, 2016

(CNN)As Hurricane Matthew continues to churn through the Atlantic, leaving more than 260 dead in the Caribbean and threatening the Florida coast, the focus must be on public safety.

 

People in the storm's path must seek refuge, as Florida's governor has implored. And those in the Caribbean likely will need assistance as they mourn their dead and clean up the wreckage.

 

But as the impact of the storm becomes clear, there's an uncomfortable truth the rest of us should wrestle with: Hurricane Matthew looks a lot like future climate change. And if we want to stop storms like this from getting even more intense, we need to do everything we can to rid the economy of fossil fuels.

 

161006214648-13-hurricane-matthew-1006-m

Hurricane Matthew closes in on Florida

We expect to see more high-intensity events, Category 4 and 5 events, that are around 13% of total hurricanes but do a disproportionate amount of damage," Kerry Emanuel, a professor of atmospheric science at MIT, told The Guardian. "The theory is robust and there are hints that we are already beginning to see it in nature."

 

"Last year was the warmest our oceans have ever been on record. And that's critical context," Michael Mann, a professor of atmospheric science at Penn State University, told Democracy Now. "It's that warmth that provides the energy that intensifies these storms. And it isn't a coincidence that we've seen the strongest hurricane in both hemispheres within the last year."

 

Emanuel, the MIT professor, told me it's not possible to say Hurricane Matthew was caused by climate change. We just don't know that. But we do know that by burning coal, natural gas and oil we are heating up the atmosphere and oceans, and that's expected to strengthen hurricanes like this over time.

 

161007030013-hurricane-matthew-devestati

Hurricane Matthew leaves devastation, destruction

 

By 2100, tropical hurricanes are expected to be 2% to 11% more intense because of global warming, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric administration, citing UN data.

 

Global warming also is expected to make hurricanes produce about 20% more rain near the eye of the storm, according to a US government report. That's critical because freshwater flooding is the second deadliest feature of hurricanes, Emanuel told me.

 

The top killer is storm surge, he said, and that also will be shaped by our fossil fuel addiction.

 

As the planet heats up, the ocean is expanding and ice sheets are melting from the land into the sea. That's causing already noticeable increases in tide lines, leading to sunny-day flooding in Miami and Norfolk, Virginia, for example, as tides spill into streets and yards. Rising tides make hurricane storm surges even higher, causing greater risks for people living on the coast.

 

"Within the next 15 years, higher sea levels combined with storm surge will likely increase the average annual cost of coastal storms along the Eastern Seaboard and the Gulf of Mexico by $2 billion to $3.5 billion," a 2014 report from the Risky Business Project, chaired by Michael Bloomberg, Henry Paulson, and Tom Steyer, found. "Adding in potential changes in hurricane activity, the likely increase in average annual losses grows to up to $7.3 billion, bringing the total annual price tag for hurricanes and other coastal storms to $35 billion."

 

The decisions we make about our energy use today will define how deadly and costly hurricanes like Matthew will be for many generations to come. We ignore these warnings at our peril.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tonight at the pigstye where i live, we are hosting a gathering of deplorable, irredeemable, offensive, hateful, mean-spirited, un-American, racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic bigoted retards.

 

Come one, come all.

 

Clothing optional.

 

I know that I'm a braindead pig but I'm too stupid to care.

If I knew where you lived, you racist shitwipe, I'd be wishing I had a Predator Drone and a few Hellfire missiles to use to do everybody a favor and raise the average intelligence of all Americans by a few points.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

He ain't presudent dumbass he is a private citizen

 

 

The gators game was postponed

Ya know Obama doesn't give a shit about your dumb traitor ass. Should have gotten yourself a generator.

 

Them gators eat anything

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...