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Hillary Blaming Goebbel Warming for Hurricane


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You can't invent stupid...

Well...certainly not if someone is as stupid as you obviously are, GrovelingBastard.....you couldn't "invent" your way out of a wet paper bag, you poor delusional imbecile.

 

And BTW, global warming IS increasing the intensity of the strongest hurricanes. The storm surges from Matthew are predicted to be 7 to 11 feet....most of the coastline where it hits will be pretty severely underwater.

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Well...certainly not if someone is as stupid as you obviously are, GrovelingBastard.....you couldn't "invent" your way out of a wet paper bag, you poor delusional imbecile.

 

And BTW, global warming IS increasing the intensity of the strongest hurricanes. The storm surges from Matthew are predicted to be 7 to 11 feet....most of the coastline where it hits will be pretty severely underwater.

 

lol, yea because we've never had storm surges like that before!

First they told us that Goebbel Warming would cause huge increases in the number of hurricanes (and tornadoes and fires)

Only none of that happened. So as they ALWAYS do, they say "Never mind that, now Goebbel Warming is making them STRONGER".

 

lol... too bad that's not true either.

From a PR standpoint, it was surely an ingenious idea: Let's name hurricanes after leading members of Congress who deny that humans are causing global warming! That's the gist of the "Climate Name Change" campaign that launched last month, and the promotional video has already garnered over 2 million YouTube views.

 

There's just one problem: Thus far this season, the hurricanes haven't shown up. In fact, the dearth of hurricane-strength Atlantic storms up until now, despiteblockbuster pre-season forecasts, counts as downright mysterious. "We've never seen this level of inactivity with the ocean conditions out there now," says meteorologist Jeff Masters, who is co-founder of Weather Underground, a popular meteorological website. There has even been speculation that 2013 might rival 2002, a year in which the first hurricane of the season didn't form until September 11.

 

Meanwhile, a new scientific paper suggests that climate change will decrease, rather than increase, the likelihood that Superstorm Sandy-like storms—atmospheric black swans that take left turns towards the US East Coast—will strike in the future. And a leaked draft of the UN's forthcoming Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report has significantly downgraded our confidence in the idea that global warming will lead to more intense hurricanes (or, is already doing so).

 

It's more than enough to make a reasonable person wonder: What the heck is up these days with hurricanes—and with global warming's supposed influence upon them? And do scientists know anything for sure about this, or are they just sticking out a finger in the (very fast) wind?

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Here is the founder of Greenpeace, telling Pogo he's an idiot. Will Pogo listen and learn? Of course not.

 

 

CO2 and temperature have NOT moved in unison. In fact, during the Jurassic, the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere plummeted while temperatures rose. The same thing disparity occurred in the Eocene. “It is (therefore) not possible to demonstrate a cause and effect relationship between CO2 and temperature over the long-term history,” Dr. Moore concludes. “Carbon is not the enemy. It is actually the reason that we are alive.”

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Democrat National Socialists are Full of Good Ideas...



Like Banning DDT



Since Ruckelshaus arbitrarily and capriciously banned DDT, an estimated 17,720,046,xxx cases of malaria have caused immense suffering and poverty in the developing world.***



Of these largely avoidable cases, 19,610,xxx people died.



giphy.gif


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Well...certainly not if someone is as stupid as you obviously are, GrovelingBastard.....you couldn't "invent" your way out of a wet paper bag, you poor delusional imbecile.

 

And BTW, global warming IS increasing the intensity of the strongest hurricanes. The storm surges from Matthew are predicted to be 7 to 11 feet....most of the coastline where it hits will be pretty severely underwater.

Most people know this except the science challenged ones clinging onto their failed propaganda agenda,

Of course there is no way to know that.

It's exactly what the science community is saying but what do they know when we have real experts on the issue like Donald Trump and Sean Hannity.
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And BTW, global warming IS increasing the intensity of the strongest hurricanes. The storm surges from Matthew are predicted to be 7 to 11 feet....most of the coastline where it hits will be pretty severely underwater.

Of course there is no way to know that.

So says ignorance...

 

In the real world, this is how it works....

 

The demented denier cult trolls are so stupid and brainwashed that they imagine that the only hurricanes that count are the ones that make landfall on the continental USA (2% of Earth's surface area). Meanwhile major hurricanes (AKA - typhoons in the Pacific; cyclones in the Indian Ocean) have formed and often avoided landfall and just curved out into the Atlantic, or hit Mexico or the Caribbean Islands, or Hawaii (Iselle - August 2014), or devastated the Philippines, Malaysia, Taiwan and China. In the real world of science, rather than the fantasy world of the anti-science deniers, here's the facts....

 

Recent research in this area suggests that hurricanes in the North Atlantic region have been intensifying over the past 40 years [11].

 

Since the mid-1970s, the number of hurricanes that reach Categories 4 and 5 in strength -- that is, the two strongest classifications -- has roughly doubled [12].

 

Measures of the potential destructiveness of hurricanes (a measure of the power of a hurricane over its entire lifetime) also show a doubling during this time period. Indices for hurricane activity based on storm surge data from tide gauges further indicate an increase in intensity [13].

 

Hurricanes in the western North Pacific and the northern Indian oceans -- known as typhoons and cyclones, respectively -- are also intensifying, though the signal is not as strong as for the North Atlantic [14].

 

Whether hurricanes are intensifying in other regions is less clear, though other recent evidence suggests that the trend toward more intense hurricanes may extend globally [15].

 

There has been little change, however, in the frequency of hurricanes globally [16]. Roughly 90 hurricanes occur each year around the world, with by far the greatest number occurring in the largest ocean basin on Earth -- the Pacific.

***

[11] Emanuel, K. 2005. Increasing destructiveness of tropical cyclones over the past 30 years. Nature 436:686-688.

 

Grinsted, A., J.C. Moore, and S. Jevrejeva. 2012. Homogeneous record of Atlantic hurricane surge threat since 1923. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 109(48):19,601-19.605.

 

Holland, G., and C.L. Bruyère. 2013. Recent intense hurricane response to global climate change. Climate Dynamics doi:10.1007/s00382-013-1713-0.

 

Kossin, J.P., K.R. Knapp, D.J. Vimont, R.J. Murnane, and B.A. Harper. 2007. A globally consistent reanalysis of hurricane variability and trends. Geophysical Research Letters 34:L04815 doi:10.1029/2006GL028836

 

Elsner, J.B., J.P. Kossin, and T.H. Jagger. 2008. The increasing intensity of the strongest tropical cyclones. Nature 455:92-95.

[12] Webster, P.J., G.J. Holland, J.A. Curry, and H.-R. Chang. 2005. Changes in tropical cyclone number, duration, and intensity in a warming environment. Science 309:1,844-1,846.

 

Kossin, J.P., K.R. Knapp, D.J. Vimont, R.J. Murnane, and B.A. Harper. 2007. A globally consistent reanalysis of hurricane variability and trends. Geophysical Research Letters 34:L04815 doi:10.1029/2006GL028836

 

[13] Emanuel, K. 2005. Increasing destructiveness of tropical cyclones over the past 30 years. Nature 436:686-688.

Emanuel, K. 2007. Environmental factors affecting tropical cyclone power dissipation. Journal of Climate 20(22):5,497-5,509.

 

Elsner, J.B., J.P. Kossin, and T.H. Jagger. 2008. The increasing intensity of the strongest tropical cyclones. Nature 455:92-95.

 

Grinsted, A., J.C. Moore, and S. Jevrejeva. 2012. Homogeneous record of Atlantic hurricane surge threat since 1923. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 109(48):19,601-19.605.

 

[14] Emanuel, K. 2007. Environmental factors affecting tropical cyclone power dissipation. Journal of Climate 20(22):5,497-5,509.

Elsner, J.B., J.P. Kossin, and T.H. Jagger. 2008. The increasing intensity of the strongest tropical cyclones. Nature 455:92-95.

 

[15] Holland, G., and C.L. Bruyère. 2013. Recent intense hurricane response to global climate change. Climate Dynamics doi:10.1007/s00382-013-1713-0.

 

[16] Webster, P.J., G.J. Holland, J.A. Curry, and H.-R. Chang. 2005. Changes in tropical cyclone number, duration, and intensity in a warming environment. Science 309:1,844-1,846.

 

Chan, J.C.L., and M. Xu. 2009, Inter-annual and inter-decadal variations of landfalling tropical cyclones in East Asia. Part I: Time series analysis. International Journal of Climatology, 29(9): 1285-1293.

 

Kubota, H., and J.C.L. Chan. 2009. Interdecadal variability of tropical cyclone landfall in the Philippines from 1902 to 2005. Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L12802.

 

Callaghan, J., and S.B. Power. 2010. Variability and decline in the number of severe tropical cyclones making land-fall over eastern Australia since the late nineteenth century. Climate Dynamics doi:10.1007/s00382-010-0883-2.

 

Seneviratne,S.I., N. Nicholls, D. Easterling, C.M. Goodess, S. Kanae, J. Kossin, Y. Luo, J. Marengo, K. McInnes, M. Rahimi,
M. Reichstein, A. Sorteberg, C. Vera, and X. Zhang. 2012. Changes in climate extremes and their impacts on the natural physical environment. In: Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation. Edited by C.B. Field, V. Barros, T.F. Stocker, D. Qin, D.J. Dokken, K.L. Ebi, M.D. Mastrandrea, K.J. Mach, G.-K. Plattner, S.K. Allen,
M. Tignor, and P.M. Midgley. A Special Report of Working Groups I and II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, and New York, NY, USA, pp. 109-230.

 

Holland, G., and C.L. Bruyère. 2013. Recent intense hurricane response to global climate change. Climate Dynamics doi:10.1007/s00382-013-1713-0.

(Source - Hurricanes and Climate Change)

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So says ignorance...

 

In the real world, this is how it works....

 

The demented denier cult trolls are so stupid and brainwashed that they imagine that the only hurricanes that count are the ones that make landfall on the continental USA (2% of Earth's surface area). Meanwhile major hurricanes (AKA - typhoons in the Pacific; cyclones in the Indian Ocean) have formed and often avoided landfall and just curved out into the Atlantic, or hit Mexico or the Caribbean Islands, or Hawaii (Iselle - August 2014), or devastated the Philippines, Malaysia, Taiwan and China. In the real world of science, rather than the fantasy world of the anti-science deniers, here's the facts....

 

Recent research in this area suggests that hurricanes in the North Atlantic region have been intensifying over the past 40 years [11].

 

Since the mid-1970s, the number of hurricanes that reach Categories 4 and 5 in strength -- that is, the two strongest classifications -- has roughly doubled [12].

 

Measures of the potential destructiveness of hurricanes (a measure of the power of a hurricane over its entire lifetime) also show a doubling during this time period. Indices for hurricane activity based on storm surge data from tide gauges further indicate an increase in intensity [13].

 

Hurricanes in the western North Pacific and the northern Indian oceans -- known as typhoons and cyclones, respectively -- are also intensifying, though the signal is not as strong as for the North Atlantic [14].

 

Whether hurricanes are intensifying in other regions is less clear, though other recent evidence suggests that the trend toward more intense hurricanes may extend globally [15].

 

There has been little change, however, in the frequency of hurricanes globally [16]. Roughly 90 hurricanes occur each year around the world, with by far the greatest number occurring in the largest ocean basin on Earth -- the Pacific.

***

[11] Emanuel, K. 2005. Increasing destructiveness of tropical cyclones over the past 30 years. Nature 436:686-688.

 

Grinsted, A., J.C. Moore, and S. Jevrejeva. 2012. Homogeneous record of Atlantic hurricane surge threat since 1923. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 109(48):19,601-19.605.

 

Holland, G., and C.L. Bruyère. 2013. Recent intense hurricane response to global climate change. Climate Dynamics doi:10.1007/s00382-013-1713-0.

 

Kossin, J.P., K.R. Knapp, D.J. Vimont, R.J. Murnane, and B.A. Harper. 2007. A globally consistent reanalysis of hurricane variability and trends. Geophysical Research Letters 34:L04815 doi:10.1029/2006GL028836

 

Elsner, J.B., J.P. Kossin, and T.H. Jagger. 2008. The increasing intensity of the strongest tropical cyclones. Nature 455:92-95.

[12] Webster, P.J., G.J. Holland, J.A. Curry, and H.-R. Chang. 2005. Changes in tropical cyclone number, duration, and intensity in a warming environment. Science 309:1,844-1,846.

 

Kossin, J.P., K.R. Knapp, D.J. Vimont, R.J. Murnane, and B.A. Harper. 2007. A globally consistent reanalysis of hurricane variability and trends. Geophysical Research Letters 34:L04815 doi:10.1029/2006GL028836

 

[13] Emanuel, K. 2005. Increasing destructiveness of tropical cyclones over the past 30 years. Nature 436:686-688.

Emanuel, K. 2007. Environmental factors affecting tropical cyclone power dissipation. Journal of Climate 20(22):5,497-5,509.

 

Elsner, J.B., J.P. Kossin, and T.H. Jagger. 2008. The increasing intensity of the strongest tropical cyclones. Nature 455:92-95.

 

Grinsted, A., J.C. Moore, and S. Jevrejeva. 2012. Homogeneous record of Atlantic hurricane surge threat since 1923. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 109(48):19,601-19.605.

 

[14] Emanuel, K. 2007. Environmental factors affecting tropical cyclone power dissipation. Journal of Climate 20(22):5,497-5,509.

Elsner, J.B., J.P. Kossin, and T.H. Jagger. 2008. The increasing intensity of the strongest tropical cyclones. Nature 455:92-95.

 

[15] Holland, G., and C.L. Bruyère. 2013. Recent intense hurricane response to global climate change. Climate Dynamics doi:10.1007/s00382-013-1713-0.

 

[16] Webster, P.J., G.J. Holland, J.A. Curry, and H.-R. Chang. 2005. Changes in tropical cyclone number, duration, and intensity in a warming environment. Science 309:1,844-1,846.

 

Chan, J.C.L., and M. Xu. 2009, Inter-annual and inter-decadal variations of landfalling tropical cyclones in East Asia. Part I: Time series analysis. International Journal of Climatology, 29(9): 1285-1293.

 

Kubota, H., and J.C.L. Chan. 2009. Interdecadal variability of tropical cyclone landfall in the Philippines from 1902 to 2005. Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L12802.

 

Callaghan, J., and S.B. Power. 2010. Variability and decline in the number of severe tropical cyclones making land-fall over eastern Australia since the late nineteenth century. Climate Dynamics doi:10.1007/s00382-010-0883-2.

 

Seneviratne,S.I., N. Nicholls, D. Easterling, C.M. Goodess, S. Kanae, J. Kossin, Y. Luo, J. Marengo, K. McInnes, M. Rahimi,
M. Reichstein, A. Sorteberg, C. Vera, and X. Zhang. 2012. Changes in climate extremes and their impacts on the natural physical environment. In: Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation. Edited by C.B. Field, V. Barros, T.F. Stocker, D. Qin, D.J. Dokken, K.L. Ebi, M.D. Mastrandrea, K.J. Mach, G.-K. Plattner, S.K. Allen,
M. Tignor, and P.M. Midgley. A Special Report of Working Groups I and II of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, and New York, NY, USA, pp. 109-230.

 

Holland, G., and C.L. Bruyère. 2013. Recent intense hurricane response to global climate change. Climate Dynamics doi:10.1007/s00382-013-1713-0.

(Source - Hurricanes and Climate Change)

 

There is no way to know for certain whether a category 3 hurricane would have been a category 2 hurricane or would have been a category 4 hurricane. You are also basing your ability to see alternate futures on the ASSUMPTION that your global warming theory is the truth. It's only a matter of time before you tell us that the cat 4 that should have been a cat 3 hurricane is proof that your global warming theory IS correct. Classic circular reasoning Chicken Little.

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There is no way to know for certain whether a category 3 hurricane would have been a category 2 hurricane or would have been a category 4 hurricane.

Anti-science retards like you assume that everyone is as ignorant and clueless as you and that even for scientists "!there is no way to know" what is happening in the real world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You are also basing your ability to see alternate futures on the ASSUMPTION that your global warming theory is the truth.

Anti-science retards like you idiotically imagine that the scientific evidence supporting the reality and extreme dangers of human caused global warming and its consequent climate changes and disruptions, and the supporting testimony of virtually the entire world scientific community are possibly only a 'YUUUGE' conspiracy and global warming is only a shaky "ASSUMPTION" and a "theory" (which in science means something very different from what ignorant retards like you think it means).

 

A scientific theory is a well-substantiated explanation of some aspect of the natural world that is acquired through the scientific method and repeatedly tested and confirmed, preferably using a written, pre-defined, protocol of observations and experiments.[1][2] Scientific theories are the most reliable, rigorous, and comprehensive form of scientific knowledge.[3]

 

It is important to note that the definition of a "scientific theory" (often ambiguously contracted to "theory" for the sake of brevity, including in this page) as used in the disciplines of science is significantly different from, and in contrast to, the common vernacular usage of the word "theory". As used in everyday non-scientific speech, "theory" implies that something is an unsubstantiated and speculative guess, conjecture, idea, or, hypothesis;[4] such a usage is the opposite of the word 'theory' in science. These different usages are comparable to the differing, and often opposing, usages of the term "prediction" in science (less ambiguously called a "scientific prediction") versus "prediction" in vernacular speech, denoting a mere hope.

 

 

 

 

 

 

It's only a matter of time before you tell us that the cat 4 that should have been a cat 3 hurricane is proof that your global warming theory IS correct. Classic circular reasoning Chicken Little.

Classic lack of reasoning, you poor delusional imbecile. Human caused rapid abrupt global warming is a fact.....a fact that is obvious to all of the sane rational people of the world who can see what is happening. You brainwashed and bamboozled denier cult dupes of the fossil fuel industry's propaganda campaign are gullible morons.
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Although the total number of hurricane type storms around the world has stayed about the same so far, there has been an increase in the numbers and intensities of the most powerful storms.....and this increase is directly linked to the warmer sea surface temperatures caused by global warming. This, along with sea level rise, is increasing the power and penetration inland of the highly destructive hurricane driven storm surges. As the coastal areas of Georgia and the Carolinas are about to experience. This will just get worse in the coming years and decades as sea levels rise much more and sea surface temperatures continue to rise, driven by the accelerating human caused, CO2-driven global warming the Earth is experiencing.

 

Hurricane Matthew is super strong  because of climate change

"Category 4 and 5 hurricanes could double or triple in the coming decades," expert warns.

Think Progress

Dr. Joe Romm

1*Zte4q-2Ajn6pS81Ty-xNeQ.jpeg

Hurricane Matthew, October 4 (via NASA)

Hurricane Matthew is slowly approaching the East Coast where it is expected to wreak havoc with storm surge, wind, and rain. Matthew has already set a number of records  -- and global warming is giving it a boost.

 

Hurricanes "extract heat energy from the ocean to convert it to the power of wind, and the warmer the ocean is, the stronger a hurricane can get if all other conditions that it needs to exist are present," meteorologist and former hurricane hunter Jeff Masters explained last month on Living on Earth. "So, scientists are confident that as we continue to heat up the oceans, were going to see more of these high-end perfect storms."

 

Case in point, as meteorologist Philip Klotzbach has noted:

  • Matthew set a new record as the longest lived Category 4 (or higher) Atlantic hurricane in October  --  84 hours.
  • By Monday, it had already "generated the most accumulated cyclone energy" of any Atlantic hurricane ever recorded in the eastern Caribbean.
  • As a result, the 2016 hurricane season has "already generated the most accumulated cyclone energy in the Atlantic in October since 2005" (the year of Katrina, Rita, and Wilma).
Lets look at some of the latest climate science. One 2013 paper found that "since 1975 there has been a substantial and observable regional and global increase in the proportion of Category 45 hurricanes of 2530 percent per °C of anthropogenic global warming." Another 2013 paper concluded that "dramatic changes in the frequency distribution of lifetime maximum intensity (LMI) have occurred in the North Atlantic," and the stronger hurricanes "have become more intense."

 

In other words, warming oceans create stronger hurricanes, like the one were seeing now.

We just lived through the hottest summer in recorded history

And possibly the hottest in "thousands of years." - thinkprogress.org

Matthew spun up from a tropical storm to a Category 5 superstorm in an alarming 36 hours. The latest research says this is also a result of global warming. "Storms are intensifying at a much more rapid pace than they used to 25 years back," explained the author of a 2012 study. "They are getting stronger more quickly and also [to a] higher category. The intensity as well as the rate of intensity is increasing."

 

A 2015 study, "A climatological study of the effect of sea-surface temperature on North Atlantic hurricane intensification," found a statistically significant relationship between higher intensification values and higher sea surface temperature [sST] values. "On average, mean intensification increases by 16 percent for every 1°C increase in mean SST."

 

This warming-driven trend toward more rapid intensification [RI] is very worrisome. "The vast majority (79 percent) of major storms are RI storms," and "the most intense storms are those that undergo RI," according to a 2016 study.

 

The latest storm tracks for superstorm Matthew have it threatening the southeast coast.

 

1*0KRtcSqoukUoB0D3JqLbcg.jpeg

 

Global warming makes all of these dangerous impacts more destructive for superstorms like Sandy and Matthew. For instance, as leading climatologist Kevin Trenberth has explained, "Owing to higher SSTs from human activities, the increased water vapor in the atmosphere leads to 5 to 10 percent more rainfall and increases the risk of flooding." He elaborates on that here.

 

More concerning is that warming-driven sea level rise makes storm surges more destructive. A 2012 study found that "the 600-mile stretch of coastline from North Carolina to Massachusetts is experiencing [sea level rise] rates that are nearly three to four times higher than the global average, a trend that may continue during the coming decades."

 

Another 2012 study found that landfalling hurricanes cause the biggest storm surges, that hurricanes with the biggest storm surges caused the most destruction, and that Katrina-sized surges "have been twice as frequent in warm years compared with cold years."

 

A 2013 paper, "Projected Atlantic Hurricane Surge Threat from Rising Temperatures," found that the most extreme storm surge events "are especially sensitive to temperature changes, and we estimate a doubling of Katrina-magnitude events associated with the warming over the 20th century." The study concludes, "We have probably crossed the threshold where Katrina magnitude hurricane surges are more likely caused by global warming than not."

 

1*fxO5UfKHB_pSCUj4CX_wPg.jpeg

Bloomberg Businessweek cover story Sandys many links to global warming

 

While we arent seeing more total hurricanes, we are seeing more of the Category 4 or 5 super-hurricanes, the ones that historically have done the most damage and destroyed entire coastal cities. Were also seeing a sharp rise in the most damaging storm surges, whereby even a Category 1 hurricane (such as Sandy) can cause unprecedented damage.

Were In A Hurricane Drought? Tell That To Victims Of Sandy, Irene And Ike.

Media pushes meme that ignores some of our worst superstorms. - thinkprogress.org

On our current path of unrestricted carbon pollution, NOAA researchers have determined that parts of the East Coast would see Sandy-level storm surges every year by mid-century. One tropical cyclone expert just warned, "Category 4 and 5 hurricanes could double or triple in the coming decades."

 

We simply cannot cut carbon pollution fast enough.

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