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Shining a Light on Trump’s Cockroach Army


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Here's a very good rundown on the T'Rump's followers....

 

Shining a Light on Trumps Cockroach Army

San Diego Free Press

BY DOUG PORTER

AUGUST 25, 2016

Todays the day when Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton confronts the ugly underside of the Trump candidacy: the alt-right. Or, as I like to call them, racists.

 

Challenged by advisors with polling data showing him losing badly among better-educated suburban whites, Donald Trump has reportedly been "softening" the inflammatory rhetoric. He's even gone so far as to accuse Clinton of being a "bigot."

 

Clinton isn't labeling Trump personally as a racist or a white nationalist; she's labeling his words and policies as such. Donald Trumps recent history in politics from his birther comments through to this campaign are all anybody needs.

 

Here's Greg Sargent at the Washington Post:

Today, Hillary Clinton will give a speech about Donald Trump and the "alt right." In an interview on CNN last night, Clinton previewed the speech by saying this:

Donald Trump has shown us who he is, and we ought to believe him. He is taking a hate movement mainstream. He's brought it into his campaign. Hes bringing it to our communities and our country.

 

And someone who's questioned the citizenship of the first African American President, who has courted white supremacists, who's been sued for housing discrimination against communities of color, who's attacked a judge for his Mexican heritage and promised a mass deportation force, is someone who is very much peddling bigotry and prejudice and paranoia. I will have more to say about this tomorrow when I give a speech in Reno.

This is sure to force a more open discussion over whether this is really what Trump is up to, and that will be a good thing. As I and many others have argued, the evidence is mounting that Trump is consciously trying to nurture a following created by his candidacy that is at least partly motivated by his appeal to their white nationalist or "alt-right" impulses. That following (one that is by no means only motivated by those impulses, to be clear) helped Trump win the nomination, and now that he appears to be aware that he might lose the general election, he may be eying ways to keep that constituency engaged beyond November, allowing him to perhaps build a media empire that caters to that audience or otherwise remain active in the political arena in some form or other.

 

(Here's a link to the text of Clintons speech.)

trump-nazi-image-249x300.jpg

A "mistake" made by the campaign puts a Star of David on an anti-Hillary ad.

FlipFlop.?

Meanwhile, the GOP candidates seeming waffling on immigration issues in the past day or so will send his alt-right fans to the barricades, and may actually play into Clintons strategy, which until now has been to simply let Trump be himself.

 

Now I know that not all Trump supporters are racists. There are lots of well-meaning Republicans whove swallowed a steady diet of radical rhetoric since the Black Guy won the presidency who've simply lost touch with reality. And since politics is about emotion much more than it is about actuality, no amount of fact-checking will sway their vote.

 

So it's time to shine a light on the cockroaches hiding in the dark places of reactionary politics. As if the media were waiting or this day to come (they were), a flood of stories is emerging.

A Historical Perspective

Heres Jeet Heer at the New Republic:

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Perhaps the clearest historical precedent for Clintons dilemma is the way John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson confronted the rise of the John Birch Society in the early 1960s, which was allied with the conservative movement that was then in the process of taking over the Republican Party. Kennedy didnt shy away from condemning the rise of right-wing extremism. In a 1961 speech in Los Angeles, Kennedy attacked "those fringes of our society who have sought to escape their own responsibility by finding a simple solution, an appealing slogan, or a convenient scapegoat. The discordant voices of extremism are heard once again in the land."

 

When Barry Goldwater became the Republican presidential nominee in 1964, he was notably unwilling to disavow the support of the Birch Society, saying he did not "consider the John Birch Society, as a group, to be extremist." This gave the Johnson administration more than ample cause to raise the issue and label Goldwater himself as an extremist

In linking Trump and the alt-right, Clinton will be following in the footsteps of Kennedy and Johnson. Like them, she'll try to define an American consensus politics that accepts conservative Republicans but rejects outright extremism. It could be that her words will spark a backlash and create more members of the alt-right, but thats by no means certain. What can be confidently stated is that the alt-right is, in fact, noxious, and that its one of the jobs of political leaders to marginalize racist movements.

Where They Come From

John Wagner at the Washington Post gives a thumbnail political history of this repackaged racist movement:

 

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The alt-right began with a speech that conservative writer Paul Gottfried delivered in 2008, after the Republican Party's electoral wipeout. Gottfried called for an "alternative right" that could defeat "the neoconservative-controlled conservative establishment." That idea was soon adopted by the "identitarian" nationalist Richard Spencer, who founded an Alternative Right website, but it was also claimed by supporters of Ron Paul and conservatives who opposed multiculturalism.

But it was Trump's presidential campaign that brought the movement into the mainstream. From the moment he told a national audience that Mexico was sending rapists and drug-dealers across the border, Trump surged in the polls.

A White Nationalist Resurgence

Dylan Matthews at Vox.com explains why it's a good and necessary thing for Clinton - beyond shoring up her support with voters suspicious of Trumps intentions - to bring this matter forward at this time.

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Insofar as the alt-right's role in the Trump movement matters, it matters because it suggests a route for Trumpism to survive past Trump. If the polls are right, Trump is set to go down in fiery defeat in November, crushed by Hillary Clinton.

But win or lose, Trump has shown that overt contempt for racial equality, naked tribalistic appeals to white racial solidarity, and vaguely authoritarian rhetoric can add up to a very successful campaign, at least within the Republican Party. That gives the alt-right new relevance, and helps convince its members that America might be ready for their ideas.

It also opens the door for a more sophisticated future candidate, one reared on alt-right arguments rather than stumbling into them the way Trump has. Such a candidate could effectively whip up an alt-right base of support, but potentially use it more intelligently and effectively than Trump. If this sounds fantastical, its worth remembering that open white supremacists like Strom Thurmond and James Eastland were serving in the US Senate 40, 30, even 20 years ago. Our current period without avowed white nationalists in power, backed by an organized constituency of the same, is the exception, not the norm.

Openly Anti-Democracy

Just as troubling as this reactionary movement's affinity for racism is its anti-democratic core. Traditionally rightist politicians used states rights and the US Constitution as a bludgeon against progressive ideas; now these alt-righty types are dispensing with the need for representative government.

 

Heres Michelle Goldberg at Slate:

 

Now the Clinton campaign has to try and explain to America what the alt right is. That might not be easy. Though [white nationalist Richard] Spencer came up with the term, it has come to define a broader congeries of reaction. The alt right encompasses longstanding racist organizations; taboo-scorning Twitter trolls; unapologetic misogynists; professional Islamophobes; and so-called neo-reactionaries, a movement of futuristic monarchists. What unites these figures is a fundamental rejection of egalitarianism, contempt for democracy, and irreverent glee in their ability to shock the bourgeoisie. Daryle Lamont Jenkins, who founded the One Peoples Project to track the far right, describes the alt right as "hipster Nazis."

The alt right generally sees itself as being at war with establishment conservatism. "The Alt Right is one name for the political tendency (actually tendencies) that exist outside of the racket of Conservatism Inc. - the GOP publicists, cheerleaders and assorted parasites who make up the Establishment Right," Peter Brimelow, the editor of VDARE, told me via email. "It addresses new issues that have surfaced since the end of the Cold War, like immigration, Affirmative Action, the emerging science of race differences, even rethinking foreign policy etc., all of which are currently kept out of public debate by the curse of Political Correctness."

Ironically, for a movement obsessed with nationalism, the alt right has more affinity with the European right than traditional American conservatives do. United by ethnicity rather than religion, it is less moralistic than the Christian right; like the right in Europe, it is more likely to condemn Muslim homophobia than to condemn homosexuals. The big alt-right event at the Republican National Convention was the Gays for Trump party hosted by Milo Yiannopoulos, Breitbart's technology editor, which drew Spencer, Brimelow and Dutch right-wing politician Geert Wilders. The alt right sees allies in France's National Front and Britains U.K. Independence Party, whose leader, Nigel Farage, rallied with Trump on Wednesday night in Mississippi.

Why Bannon Matters

Media Matters has published a handy guide for who these people are, what they stand for, and the media outlets used to convey their messages. The Trump campaign takeover by Breitbart News Stephen Bannon signals a victory for their movement.

 

Bannon told Mother Jones that Breitbart News is "the platform for the alt-right."

 

Bannon took over as chairman of Breitbart News after the death of founder Andrew Breitbart. The site has taken a rabidly anti-immigrant tone, often hyping "reports about crime involving immigrants, with headlines that sound like they came from tabloids" and attacking Republicans who favor immigration reform. Vox notes that "Breitbart essentially functioned as an anti-immigration pressure group, signaling to Republican leaders that any deviation on immigration would earn them the wrath of the base."

 

The site has also pushed a white nationalist viewpoint in articles on race and religion. It described the shooting of a white reporter and her white cameraman as a "race murder" and published an article titled "Political Correctness Protects Muslim Rape Culture."

 

Finally this, from the Southern Poverty Law Centers Hatewatch Blog:

Former staff has accused Bannon of running meetings at Breitbart like white supremacist rallies. Ben Shapiro, formerly of Breitbart News, has gone so far as to claim that under Bannon's leadership:

Breitbart has become the alt-right go-to website, with [Milo] Yiannopoulos pushing white ethno-nationalism as a legitimate response to political correctness, and the comment section turning into a cesspool for white supremacist mememakers.

Last night, Richard Spencer, arguably the father of the Alt-Right issued a press release claiming that connecting the Alt-Right to Trump and Bannon is "guilt-by-association" and that they are simply peaceful advocates for European-Americans.

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Trumps twisted rationale, thinking he could win the presidency, by attempting every repulsive tactic, racial insult, misogynist remark, poking fun at disabled, dissing those who have served militarily, proves beyond a reasonable doubt... the man is bat-shit crazy, out of touch, nuts, stoopid, remarkably naive, deeply mentally disturbed.

 

The GOP will take years to live down the clownish moron Donald Trump...

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Here's more on this topic.....which the T'Rump-suckers on this forum are avoiding like the plague...

 

Trump Has Made America More Racist. Republicans Are OK With That.

New Republic

BY BRIAN BEUTLER

July 18, 2016

Indiana Governor Mike Pence's looming nomination for the vice presidency, and the whimpering failure of the #NeverTrump movements convention coup, consecrate the Republican Party's decision to accept Donald Trump as their party's standard bearer and make peace with the kind of politics he practices. Republicans won't officially nominate Trump until Thursday, but they drafted the deal over the past two months, and finalized the language this past week.

 

In a news environment that's saturated with fleeting outrages, false equivalences, and fluctuating poll numbers, it's easy to lose sight of the fact that Republicans aren't just ratifying a new set of policy ideas and crudities. Trump has already awakened and sanctioned a kind of latent social disorder among his supporters, many of whom harbored racist sentiments silently or privately, but who now feel emboldened to act upon their views in public: in classrooms; at cash registers, and kiosks around the country.

 

It is difficult, but not totally impossible, to quantify this Trump effect, but if you simply listen to the experiences of people in the communities Trump has vilified, his influence over minority experience in American life is easy to characterize. It is ugly and nefarious. And Republicans have decided to normalize it.

 

News reports have chronicled a variety of incidents across the country over the months of Trump's political juggernaut, some of which captured the public's imagination briefly, only to be filed away as a datapoint in a survey that never seems to come to completion.

 

Perhaps the most famous incident occurred four months ago, at a high school basketball game in Indiana, when "a group of Andrean students produced signs and images of presidential candidate Donald Trump and began to chant 'Build that wall,' at the Bishop Noll team and fans, who are heavily Hispanic," according to a statement from the dioceses that oversees both schools.

 

But other, similar stories have garnered much less attention.

  • A Trump supporter (apparently a white supremacist) screamed "Go fucking make my tortilla motherfucker and build that fucking wall for me" at Trump protesters in Arizona.
  • Two northern Virginia third-graders singled out a classmate as one of the "immigrants" who would be sent "home" when Trump is president.
  • A Los Angeles journalist described what has become common if not typical in the Trump era. "A couple of weeks ago, while I was running errands in my neighborhood, a stranger asked me if I was 'illegal.' Around 10 minutes earlier another stranger asked me if I spoke English. Both were white and one of them even called me 'señorita.'"
  • Last week, a CNN law enforcement analyst said black people are prone to criminality - "Well, they are!" - before partially walking it back.
There was never a time when racist incidents like these didn't occur. But if we believe the words of the people who are absorbing Trumps ire, and of the people Trump has inspired, we must reckon with the fact that more people now feel they have permission to participate in them. That is Trumps doing. Minorities living and working in different communities describe the phenomenon in almost identical words.

 

"Trump has energized these groups by igniting their hate and making the use of bigoted speech more normalized, if not more acceptable," wrote Brittany Stalsburg, the founder of a feminist organization. A gay, Jewish colleague of hers had appeared on television news as a Hillary Clinton supporter and received a torrent of emails calling him a "faggot," "peter puffing pervert," and "Heblew," who will soon "crawl back under the rocks that you came from."

 

Sarah Ibrahim, the mother of a fourth-grade boy whose classmates told him his mother would be deported, explained to Reuters, "What Trump did was make these hidden thoughts public. He gave people permission to speak out loud, he removed the shame associated with being prejudiced. People know that they wont be punished."

 

Stalsburg lives in New York, Ibrahim in Maryland. And the white nativists who support Trump inadvertently confirm their suspicions. David Duke, for instance, feels Trump has validated white supremacy enough to consider a run for Congress. In his sweeping exploration of Trumpism, New York Times reporter Nick Confessore quoted a supporter at a Trump rally in Richmond, Virginia, who has grievances with Mexican immigrants and credits Trump for making him feel comfortable airing them. "They'll tell you straight to your face, 'This is our country now - no more gringos!'" he said. "They're not in it for our culture. They're not here to assimilate. [Trump] says what everyone thinks. He says what we're all thinking. Hes bringing people together. We say, 'Hey, thats right; we can say this.'"

 

99dc683f31e6c6b508ba771eba5fac9fc6fd9841

Muslim shopkeeper Sarkar Haq, who was beaten in an alleged hate crime, at his shop in New York on December 7, 2015. - JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

There can be a fine line between asking for numerical proof of the Trump effect, and calling into doubt the testimony of minorities who claim they experience more racism now than before Trump declared his candidacy. But the data we do have, it's no surprise, supports the views of those who say they feel more antagonized, and those who say they feel more comfortable being antagonistic.

 

The Council on American-Islamic Relations, in partnership with University of California, Berkeley, released a report last month which found that the targeting of mosques nearly quadrupled last year over the two preceding years. In May, Georgetown University reported similar finding.

 

When analysts at the Southern Poverty Law Center solicited feedback from K-12 teachers about the effect the election is having in their classrooms, they were inundated with reports from teachers volunteering that Trump (whose name did not appear in the survey) is exacerbating ethnic tensions in schools across the country.

 

The year-plus since Trump declared his candidacy isn't the first stretch in recent memory when minorities have sensed a heightened level of resentment from whites. What makes the current period unique is the similarity between what minorities experience in their communities and the things Trump says from the lectern at his rallies. Trump may to some extent be echoing grievances that would've arisen anyhow in response to things like terrorist attacks. But we don't need studies to know that Trump has fomented these grievances, and continues to exploit them for political gain.

 

These are the wages of the Republican Partys decision to indulge Trump. And the doubly horrifying thing about it is that the GOPs most influential officials have been candid the whole time about the threat he poses to American social cohesion.

 

When Trump incited a bigoted backlash to the Latino judge presiding over fraud litigation against Trump University, House Speaker Paul Ryan called it "the textbook definition of a racist comment."

 

Before suspending his own presidential campaign, Senator Marco Rubio made a final plea for the public to reject Trump. "This is what happens when a leading presidential candidate goes around feeding into a narrative of anger and bitterness and frustration," he said. "If this continues, I think this country will continue to be ripped apart at the seams... you can't say whatever you want. It has real-life consequences for people in this country and for people all over the world."

 

"Donald is cynically exploiting that anger," said Senator Ted Cruz, hours before his own presidential campaign ended, "and Donald is lying to his supporters."

 

All three are speaking in some capacity on Trump's behalf this week. The convention in Cleveland is their way of saying they've seen the impact he's having on the country, and despite their misgivings, it's something they can live with.

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The T'Rump-suckers on this forum are obviously afraid to confront the truth about T'Rump's blatant racism, so they are avoiding this thread that makes it so plain that T'Rump is empowering racists all over the country to feel free to openly express their deranged racism.

 

Here's another good example.

 

This DISGUSTING Truck Shows How Trump Is Bringing Racists Out Of The Closet

By Colin Taylor

September 6, 2016

In case you needed any more proof that Donald Trump is bringing neo-Nazis and white supremacists out of the woodwork and back into the public eye, look no further than this unfathomably offensive vehicle spotted in Oregon:

 

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This truck is painted with half of what is clearly a swastika -- and in case the intention was at all in question, the words "JEW LIES MATTER" are emblazoned on the back.

 

This is Donald Trumps America, where racists are so emboldened that they are openly driving around in vehicles with genocidal symbols and anti-Semitic slogans. Former Ku Klux Klan grand wizard David Duke literally said that Trump is going to "make Hitler great again"; online white supremacist forums have declared Trump to be their "Savior," and Trump himself has openly encouraged them with his ethnonationalist rhetoric and minority scapegoating.

 

Our nation was founded on the values of tolerance and cultural pluralism; while, admittedly, we've never been entirely successful in making those values a reality, we at least have always aspired to express them. Donald Trump is presenting a rejection of everything the Founding Fathers believed in and of the unity that made our nation a superpower in the first place. This open display of racism -- with all of its genocidal connotations -- is a truly disgusting sight to see in 2016. We can thank the Republican Party for cultivating that racism for decades before Trump brought it out into the open.

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Trump has spent 14 months deeply insulting women, little girls that sang for him, blacks, latinos, jews, muslims, disabled, p.o.w.'s, the entire top military brass, encouraged the 2nd amendment gun nuts to 'take care of his opponent if she wins', and too many other evil demented insults...

 

Trump has been an enabler to neo-nazis and disgusting white trash bigots, for 14 months, and for 5 years with the Obama/birther crap. About 6 months ago someone in earshot of me said "Trump,Trump, Kill ALL The [African-American slur]s... They regretted what they said, beilieve me...

 

4 decades ago he and his father settled out of court for racially discriminating.

 

Trump makes Barry Goldwater look like MLK.

 

Our always great nation will not elect such a peice of scum by the name of Donald Trump.

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The T'Rump is definitely bringing the racists out of the shadows and making it crystal clear that racism is unfortunately still very alive and quite strong in America.

 

Even his slogan - "Make America Great Again" - is an appeal to the racists who idiotically believe that electing our (very successful) first black President somehow made our country 'not-great'. The slogan, as T'Rump uses it, is really racist code for "Make America White Again".

 

Here's a good discussion of this issue...

 

Racism Is Real. Trump Helps Show It.

The New York Times

By JENÉE DESMOND-HARRIS

APRIL 29, 2016

I have a confession: When Donald J. Trump swept five primaries on Tuesday, I was a little bit excited. And I don't think Im the only person who despises the role racism plays in American life who feels this way.

 

Let me explain.

 

For a certain group of voters, part of Mr. Trump's appeal is obvious. They hear their own views echoed in his divisive and bigoted rhetoric. They're the ones who nod in agreement that Mexican immigrants are rapists who are "bringing drugs"and that all Muslims should be barred from entering the United States. They're people who think the linguistic anachronism "the blacks" sounds appropriate. They yearn for the return to a long-lost "great" version of America that it's safe to guess existed before the implementation of the Civil Rights Act.

 

I'm not in this group. The prospect of a Trump presidency horrifies me. Like many others, I find the bigotry behind the Republican front-runner's most controversial views infuriating and frightening.

 

But I also find it familiar. I'm a journalist who writes about race, so I spend a lot of time thinking about the way racism shapes American life, both in individual interactions and in the way institutions operate. What's most frustrating is that, despite all the evidence, convincing people who would rather not believe that this is real can be hard.

 

Last March, I reported on the Department of Justice's findings that the police and municipal courts in Ferguson, Mo., had consistently violated the constitutional rights of the city's black residents. The article included a summary of the abuse of power investigators uncovered, as well as the content of public officials emails. (One example: a photo of a bare-chested group of dancing women, apparently in Africa, captioned "Michelle Obama's High School Reunion.")

 

Simply for presenting the investigation's findings and the cops' and court officials' revealing words, I received a barrage of angry messages asking why I had to "make everything about race."

 

I've heard the same sort of thing in response to news stories about police killings of unarmed African-Americans, black girls facing disproportionate school discipline, record numbers of anti-Muslim attacks. Stop being divisive. People who focus on these things are the real racists. Racism is in the past.

 

One thing has been made very clear to me: Many people resent being confronted with information about how racism still shapes -- and sometimes, ruins -- life in this country.

 

Plenty of politicians are happy to take advantage of an American inclination to explain away even the most blatant racism. In September, Gov. Paul R. LePage, Republican of Maine, attributed drug abuse in his state to "Guys with the name D-Money, Smoothie, Shifty," who, he added, often "impregnate a young white girl before they leave." Taken to task for the racial implications of his comments, he insisted that his description of "white" girls was race-neutral. His spokesman backed him up, saying, "Race is irrelevant."

 

Tomás Jiménez, an associate professor of sociology and comparative studies in race and ethnicity at Stanford University, uses what he calls the "ghost metaphor" to describe the quandary of people who personally experience or aim to draw attention to racism. "It haunts every aspect of your life, but nobody else sees it and they don't believe you" he said. "Sometimes it makes a very pronounced appearance, and that's why people seize on it."

 

That, he told me, is why Mr. Trump is refreshing to people who share his views, as well as to people who have always known that views like this exist.

 

In a world where racism and discrimination -- both personal and systemic -- shape opportunities and can even determine life or death, but are often denied, they're rarely owned so boldly as they have been during this campaign.

 

As Professor Jiménez put it, "Trump and his supporters have turned the racial dog whistle into an air horn."

 

The air horn is so piercingly loud that few can pretend they don't hear it, or understand what it represents about the country.

 

At a March rally for Mr. Trump in Louisville, Shiya Nwanguma, a student, says she was called the n-word and other repulsive slurs. Video of the event shows her being pushed and shoved. Another protester there, Chanelle Helm, told Vibe magazine in March: "In my entire life I had never had anyone look at me with such hate. It was like the videos and photos we've seen from the Little Rock 9 and other school integration moments from the 1950s and '60s where the fury was palpable in the eyes of the white women."

 

At a high school basketball game in Indiana earlier this year, CNN reported that students chanted "Build that wall," at an opposing team made up predominantly of Latino players.

 

The expression of racist views in this campaign has been so undeniable that even politicians -- notoriously careful and diplomatic -- are stating it as fact.

 

"America's long struggle with racism is far from over, and we are seeing that in this election," Hillary Clinton said at the National Action Network convention in April. She didn't say racial tension, or community-police relations, or inequality, or issues faced by black and Latino Americans. She said: racism.

 

For once, nobody is pretending that racism is at a frequency so high they can't make it out. Racism is no longer being treated as a feeling, an allegation, a matter of opinion, or something that can be negated by the announcement of a black friend.

 

Mr. Trump and his supporters serve another function, too: They expose the falsehood of the seductive myth that with time and increased diversity, racism will inevitably evaporate.

 

Whatever happens to Mr. Trump's bid for the White House, the people who flocked to his rallies, who deployed the wall he hoped to build as slurs, will still be around.

 

When Barack Obama was first elected president in 2008, a question bubbled up: "Is America on its way to being post-racial?" It was always laughably optimistic, but now we have a clearer answer than ever: no.

 

"The idea that there ever was a colorblind America was very short-lived," Professor Jiménez said, but Mr. Obama's presidency did provide fodder for those who were tempted to think that increased diversity would make bigotry a relic of the past.

 

If diversity is going to cause racial anxiety, it's better to accept that than to lie to ourselves about the inevitability of a harmonious multiracial melting pot. It's good to know the truth. And Mr. Trump's supporters seemed to have provided a reality check.

 

Last week, a bookstore cashier made small talk with me and asked me what I write about as I checked out. "Mostly race," I said. His face fell.

 

"I'm not supposed to talk about politics," he said. "But Donald Trump " His voice faded out as he shook his head. "I'd hoped we'd get to a better place with race, but I just don't know if we'll ever get there."

 

That doubt is wise. When it comes to getting to "a better place with race," there's no reason for blind optimism. We should have a healthy fear that well never get over the continuing effects of racism instead of a sugarcoated assumption that time and shifting census data on race will fix it.

 

Mr. Trump and his supporters have reignited that fear, even in people who claimed they couldn't hear dog whistles. Even in people who swore they didn't believe in ghosts.

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  1. 99dc683f31e6c6b508ba771eba5fac9fc6fd9841

    Muslim shopkeeper Sarkar Haq, who was beaten in an alleged hate crime, at his shop in New York on December 7, 2015. - JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

Alleged hate crime.

Alleged decapitator? nolen-facebook-two1.jpg

No, he really did it.

Police: Woman beheaded at Oklahoma workplace - CBS News

I do not know if the Muslim who was attacked was the victim of a hate crime. How about the woman who was decapitated?

Hate crime or not, I do believe I would prefer the black eye, to my head rolling across the floor.

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Here's a very good rundown on the T'Rump's followers....

 

Shining a Light on Trumps Cockroach Army

San Diego Free Press

BY DOUG PORTER

AUGUST 25, 2016

Todays the day when Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton confronts the ugly underside of the Trump candidacy: the alt-right. Or, as I like to call them, racists.

 

Clinton isn't labeling Trump personally as a racist or a white nationalist; she's labeling his words and policies as such. Donald Trumps recent history in politics from his birther comments through to this campaign are all anybody needs.

 

Here's Greg Sargent at the Washington Post:

 

Today, Hillary Clinton will give a speech about Donald Trump and the "alt right." In an interview on CNN last night, Clinton previewed the speech by saying this: "Donald Trump has shown us who he is, and we ought to believe him. He is taking a hate movement mainstream. He's brought it into his campaign. Hes bringing it to our communities and our country. And someone who's questioned the citizenship of the first African American President, who has courted white supremacists, who's been sued for housing discrimination against communities of color, who's attacked a judge for his Mexican heritage and promised a mass deportation force, is someone who is very much peddling bigotry and prejudice and paranoia. I will have more to say about this tomorrow when I give a speech in Reno."

 

This is sure to force a more open discussion over whether this is really what Trump is up to, and that will be a good thing. As I and many others have argued, the evidence is mounting that Trump is consciously trying to nurture a following created by his candidacy that is at least partly motivated by his appeal to their white nationalist or "alt-right" impulses. That following (one that is by no means only motivated by those impulses, to be clear) helped Trump win the nomination, and now that he appears to be aware that he might lose the general election, he may be eying ways to keep that constituency engaged beyond November, allowing him to perhaps build a media empire that caters to that audience or otherwise remain active in the political arena in some form or other.

 

  • 99dc683f31e6c6b508ba771eba5fac9fc6fd9841Muslim shopkeeper Sarkar Haq, who was beaten in an alleged hate crime, at his shop in New York on December 7, 2015. - JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
Alleged hate crime.

Alleged decapitator? nolen-facebook-two1.jpg

No, he really did it.

Police: Woman beheaded at Oklahoma workplace - CBS News

I do not know if the Muslim who was attacked was the victim of a hate crime. How about the woman who was decapitated?

Hate crime or not, I do believe I would prefer the black eye, to my head rolling across the floor.

Oh goodie.....one of Trump's cockroach army has popped up to defend him by citing something irrelevant and meaningless....which is just as stupid as you would expect from these braindead morons.

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Oh goodie.....one of Trump's cockroach army has popped up to defend him by citing something irrelevant and meaningless....which is just as stupid as you would expect from these braindead morons.

Liberal 101 - - - an "alleged" hate crime against a Muslim, cannot be countered with an actual decapitation of a human being, by a Muslim.

Whoever posted this felt it was quite relevant. 99dc683f31e6c6b508ba771eba5fac9fc6fd9841

Muslim shopkeeper Sarkar Haq, who was beaten in an alleged hate crime, at his shop in New York on December 7, 2015. - *************************************************************************************************So, Pogo , why isn't this relevant?

Is this man a Muslim? Is Islam his religion? Did he decapitate an innocent woman? nolen-facebook-two1.jpg

 

Police: Woman beheaded at Oklahoma workplace - CBS News

So alleged crime vs documented crime.

Pogo, you are an absolute clown. Liberal 101

**************************************************************************************

Liberal 101 - Relevant: Alleged crime. 99dc683f31e6c6b508ba771eba5fac9fc6fd9841

Muslim shopkeeper Sarkar Haq, who was beaten in an alleged hate crime, at his shop in New York on December 7, 2015.

Irrelevant:Documented crime. nolen-facebook-two1.jpg

Police: Woman beheaded at Oklahoma workplace - CBS News

So alleged crime vs documented crime.

  1. Pogo, how old are you?

Is this man a Muslim? Is Islam his religion? Did he decapitate an innocent woman? nolen-facebook-two1.jpg

 

Police: Woman beheaded at Oklahoma workplace - CBS News

Please make an effort to avoid Liberal 101 in the reply.

A simple Yes or No will suffice.

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Liberal 101 - - - an "alleged" hate crime against a Muslim, cannot be countered with an actual decapitation of a human being, by a Muslim.

If you weren't such a moronic brainwashed racist & xenophobe, JustStupid, you might be able to comprehend the fact that the subject of this thread is how the T'Rump's constant unrelenting racism and xenophobia has energized a small army of retarded racist bigots like yourself and inspired hate crimes against innocent children and ordinary citizens. The quite real 'hate crime' against a shopkeeper in New York that was cited in that article is very relevant to that topic. Your moronically lame attempt to "counter" that specific 'hate crime' by displaying your own extremely blatant racism by citing an act of violence by some random guy who happened to be Muslim is both hilariously a confirmation of the T'Rump supporters' racism discussed in the OP, and totally irrelevant to the topic of the reality of the Trump's encouragement of the vile qualities that are the opposite of what America stands for - hateful, mean-spirited, racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic, anti-Semitic, and bigoted.

 

You REALLY are a complete idiot!

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If you weren't such a moronic brainwashed racist & xenophobe, JustStupid, you might be able to comprehend the fact that the subject of this thread is how the T'Rump's constant unrelenting racism and xenophobia has energized a small army of retarded racist bigots like yourself and inspired hate crimes against innocent children and ordinary citizens. The quite real 'hate crime' against a shopkeeper in New York that was cited in that article is very relevant to that topic. Your moronically lame attempt to "counter" that specific 'hate crime' by displaying your own extremely blatant racism by citing an act of violence by some random guy who happened to be Muslim is both hilariously a confirmation of the T'Rump supporters' racism discussed in the OP, and totally irrelevant to the topic of the reality of the Trump's encouragement of the vile qualities that are the opposite of what America stands for - hateful, mean-spirited, racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic, anti-Semitic, and bigoted.

 

You REALLY are a complete idiot!

I will admit, certain rhetoric does energize certain people.

Is this man a Muslim? Is Islam his religion? Did he decapitate an innocent woman? nolen-facebook-two1.jpg

 

Police: Woman beheaded at Oklahoma workplace - CBS News

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I do see a lot of hate here.

Of course ( Liberal 101 ), none of the above can compare to a Muslim getting a black eye.

99dc683f31e6c6b508ba771eba5fac9fc6fd9841

Two black eyes would have been completely off the Liberal 101 hate scale.

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Here's more on this topic.....which the T'Rump-suckers on this forum are avoiding like the plague...

 

Trump Has Made America More Racist. Republicans Are OK With That.

New Republic

BY BRIAN BEUTLER

July 18, 2016

Indiana Governor Mike Pence's looming nomination for the vice presidency, and the whimpering failure of the #NeverTrump movements convention coup, consecrate the Republican Party's decision to accept Donald Trump as their party's standard bearer and make peace with the kind of politics he practices. Republicans won't officially nominate Trump until Thursday, but they drafted the deal over the past two months, and finalized the language this past week.

 

In a news environment that's saturated with fleeting outrages, false equivalences, and fluctuating poll numbers, it's easy to lose sight of the fact that Republicans aren't just ratifying a new set of policy ideas and crudities. Trump has already awakened and sanctioned a kind of latent social disorder among his supporters, many of whom harbored racist sentiments silently or privately, but who now feel emboldened to act upon their views in public: in classrooms; at cash registers, and kiosks around the country.

 

It is difficult, but not totally impossible, to quantify this Trump effect, but if you simply listen to the experiences of people in the communities Trump has vilified, his influence over minority experience in American life is easy to characterize. It is ugly and nefarious. And Republicans have decided to normalize it.

 

News reports have chronicled a variety of incidents across the country over the months of Trump's political juggernaut, some of which captured the public's imagination briefly, only to be filed away as a datapoint in a survey that never seems to come to completion.

 

Perhaps the most famous incident occurred four months ago, at a high school basketball game in Indiana, when "a group of Andrean students produced signs and images of presidential candidate Donald Trump and began to chant 'Build that wall,' at the Bishop Noll team and fans, who are heavily Hispanic," according to a statement from the dioceses that oversees both schools.

 

But other, similar stories have garnered much less attention.

 

  • A Trump supporter (apparently a white supremacist) screamed "Go fucking make my tortilla motherfucker and build that fucking wall for me" at Trump protesters in Arizona.
  • Two northern Virginia third-graders singled out a classmate as one of the "immigrants" who would be sent "home" when Trump is president.
  • A Los Angeles journalist described what has become common if not typical in the Trump era. "A couple of weeks ago, while I was running errands in my neighborhood, a stranger asked me if I was 'illegal.' Around 10 minutes earlier another stranger asked me if I spoke English. Both were white and one of them even called me 'señorita.'"
  • Last week, a CNN law enforcement analyst said black people are prone to criminality - "Well, they are!" - before partially walking it back.
There was never a time when racist incidents like these didn't occur. But if we believe the words of the people who are absorbing Trumps ire, and of the people Trump has inspired, we must reckon with the fact that more people now feel they have permission to participate in them. That is Trumps doing. Minorities living and working in different communities describe the phenomenon in almost identical words.

 

"Trump has energized these groups by igniting their hate and making the use of bigoted speech more normalized, if not more acceptable," wrote Brittany Stalsburg, the founder of a feminist organization. A gay, Jewish colleague of hers had appeared on television news as a Hillary Clinton supporter and received a torrent of emails calling him a "faggot," "peter puffing pervert," and "Heblew," who will soon "crawl back under the rocks that you came from."

 

Sarah Ibrahim, the mother of a fourth-grade boy whose classmates told him his mother would be deported, explained to Reuters, "What Trump did was make these hidden thoughts public. He gave people permission to speak out loud, he removed the shame associated with being prejudiced. People know that they wont be punished."

 

Stalsburg lives in New York, Ibrahim in Maryland. And the white nativists who support Trump inadvertently confirm their suspicions. David Duke, for instance, feels Trump has validated white supremacy enough to consider a run for Congress. In his sweeping exploration of Trumpism, New York Times reporter Nick Confessore quoted a supporter at a Trump rally in Richmond, Virginia, who has grievances with Mexican immigrants and credits Trump for making him feel comfortable airing them. "They'll tell you straight to your face, 'This is our country now - no more gringos!'" he said. "They're not in it for our culture. They're not here to assimilate. [Trump] says what everyone thinks. He says what we're all thinking. Hes bringing people together. We say, 'Hey, thats right; we can say this.'"

 

99dc683f31e6c6b508ba771eba5fac9fc6fd9841

Muslim shopkeeper Sarkar Haq, who was beaten in an alleged hate crime, at his shop in New York on December 7, 2015. - JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

 

There can be a fine line between asking for numerical proof of the Trump effect, and calling into doubt the testimony of minorities who claim they experience more racism now than before Trump declared his candidacy. But the data we do have, it's no surprise, supports the views of those who say they feel more antagonized, and those who say they feel more comfortable being antagonistic.

 

The Council on American-Islamic Relations, in partnership with University of California, Berkeley, released a report last month which found that the targeting of mosques nearly quadrupled last year over the two preceding years. In May, Georgetown University reported similar finding.

 

When analysts at the Southern Poverty Law Center solicited feedback from K-12 teachers about the effect the election is having in their classrooms, they were inundated with reports from teachers volunteering that Trump (whose name did not appear in the survey) is exacerbating ethnic tensions in schools across the country.

 

The year-plus since Trump declared his candidacy isn't the first stretch in recent memory when minorities have sensed a heightened level of resentment from whites. What makes the current period unique is the similarity between what minorities experience in their communities and the things Trump says from the lectern at his rallies. Trump may to some extent be echoing grievances that would've arisen anyhow in response to things like terrorist attacks. But we don't need studies to know that Trump has fomented these grievances, and continues to exploit them for political gain.

 

These are the wages of the Republican Partys decision to indulge Trump. And the doubly horrifying thing about it is that the GOPs most influential officials have been candid the whole time about the threat he poses to American social cohesion.

 

When Trump incited a bigoted backlash to the Latino judge presiding over fraud litigation against Trump University, House Speaker Paul Ryan called it "the textbook definition of a racist comment."

 

Before suspending his own presidential campaign, Senator Marco Rubio made a final plea for the public to reject Trump. "This is what happens when a leading presidential candidate goes around feeding into a narrative of anger and bitterness and frustration," he said. "If this continues, I think this country will continue to be ripped apart at the seams... you can't say whatever you want. It has real-life consequences for people in this country and for people all over the world."

 

"Donald is cynically exploiting that anger," said Senator Ted Cruz, hours before his own presidential campaign ended, "and Donald is lying to his supporters."

 

All three are speaking in some capacity on Trump's behalf this week. The convention in Cleveland is their way of saying they've seen the impact he's having on the country, and despite their misgivings, it's something they can live with.

 

I see you're still boring the shit out of everyone.

 

 

Making a concise point is much better than posting an entire encyclopedia.

 

 

:)

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I see you're still boring the shit out of everyone.

 

 

Making a concise point is much better than posting an entire encyclopedia.

 

 

:)

Pogo is easily caught up in minutia situations; while the big picture is beyond Pogo's scope of reasoning.

This becomes a horrific hate crime.

99dc683f31e6c6b508ba771eba5fac9fc6fd9841

While this is dismissed;

 

Is this man a Muslim? Is Islam his religion? Did he decapitate an innocent woman? nolen-facebook-two1.jpg

 

Police: Woman beheaded at Oklahoma workplace - CBS News

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Trying to reason with Pogo is beating the bones of the dead horse. It is a waste of time & energy.

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If you weren't such a moronic brainwashed racist & xenophobe, JustStupid, you might be able to comprehend the fact that the subject of this thread is how the T'Rump's constant unrelenting racism and xenophobia has energized a small army of retarded racist bigots like yourself and inspired hate crimes against innocent children and ordinary citizens. The quite real 'hate crime' against a shopkeeper in New York that was cited in that article is very relevant to that topic. Your moronically lame attempt to "counter" that specific 'hate crime' by displaying your own extremely blatant racism by citing an act of violence by some random guy who happened to be Muslim is both hilariously a confirmation of the T'Rump supporters' racism discussed in the OP, and totally irrelevant to the topic of the reality of the Trump's encouragement of the vile qualities that are the opposite of what America stands for - hateful, mean-spirited, racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic, anti-Semitic, and bigoted.

 

You REALLY are a complete idiot!

the same meaningless, irrelevant, off-topic, Islamaphobic, racist bullshit I just reatedly posted, trying in my moronic way to demonstrate how prejudiced I am against an entire world religion of over 1.3 billion people because of the actions of a few badasses....and I'll keep posting this twaddle over and over because I am a troll and I am trying to distract attention from Trump's racism, mysogeny, and anti-Islamic xenophobia, and hopefully derail this thread.

Kind of like being prejudiced against ALL Christians because of the awfulness of the Westboro Baptists....or the Crusades....or the Inqisition....

 

Your idiotic posts, JustStupid, are off-topic and have nothing to do with T'Rump's appeal to the worst elements in American society....the hateful, mean-spirited, racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic bigots that his campaign is empowering and attracting.....people like you and some of the other rightwingnut trolls on this forum who are part of Trump's 'cockroach army'.

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Here's a very good rundown on the T'Rump's followers....

 

Shining a Light on Trumps Cockroach Army

San Diego Free Press

BY DOUG PORTER

AUGUST 25, 2016

 

A human brain vs humanity's intellectual mind, which will rule forever until humans exist no more as part of everything here specifically displaced kinetically and divided by a political mind, spiritual heart, body of artistic impression, to the soul of societal evolution and economic possibilities honoring symbolism over substance and mind vocabulary because one stands against the mob waiting for life to be fair rather than balanced by self contained to the moment here?

 

Rhetorical question as the answer is in the question..

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Kind of like being prejudiced against ALL Christians because of the awfulness of the Westboro Baptists....or the Crusades....or the Inqisition....

 

Your idiotic posts, JustStupid, are off-topic and have nothing to do with T'Rump's appeal to the worst elements in American society....the hateful, mean-spirited, racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic, Islamaphobic bigots that his campaign is empowering and attracting.....people like you and some of the other rightwingnut trolls on this forum who are part of Trump's 'cockroach army'.

The Inquisition was a black mark on Christianity. The Crusades, not so.

That being said:

Islamic Terrorists... ...killed twice as many people in one month (5000) in November, 2014) than were killed in in 350 years of Inquisition (2000-3000).

And I ( sigh ) once again repeat myself. Every religion has had dark & shameful periods in their histories; but only one has refused to climb from the cesspool of ignorance. While Jews & Christians struggle to climb from that cesspool, Islam continues to drag the world in.

Am I an expert on Islam; absolutely not. But it does appear, these people, who were born into Islam, have a very compelling story to tell.

ISLAM WATCH

Who are we?

We are a group of Muslim apostates, who have left Islam out of our own conviction when we discovered that Islam is not a religion at all. Most of us took a prolonged period of time to study, evaluate and contemplate on Islam, the religion of our birth. Having meticulously scrutinized Islam, we concluded that it is not a religion of peace at all, as touted by smooth-talking, self-serving Muslims and their apologists from non-Muslim backgrounds. The core of Islam—namely the Qur'an, Hadis and Sharia—is filled with unbounded hatred of the unbelievers, unbelievably intolerant toward them, and extremely cruel and merciless to those Muslims, who dare to deviate from its doctrines.

We also realized that Islam is beyond reformation, because Muslims—who attempt to modernize and reform its unremitting bigotry, irrational rituals, and cruel and draconian punitive measures—are targeted for annihilation. Our verdict was that the only way to escape from the tyranny of Islam is to leave it altogether. We have, therefore, discarded Islam from our life, so that we can be free to enjoy a normal, pleasant and humane life in complete harmony with all peoples on earth, irrespective of their religion, race or creed.

Having thoroughly understood—through our meticulous investigation of Islam for years to decades—that Islam was nothing but a lie, most of us have left Islam silently, because of the mortal threats of Islam on our life. As Islamic terrorism and violence overwhelms the world, particularly in the post-9/11 years, we also felt that it's a responsibility upon us to make world's 1.4+ billion Muslims aware of the falsity of their religion and its cruel nature, so that they can make informed choices and leave Islam to live with love, respect and harmony with the rest of humanity.

We also felt it incumbent upon us to make the non-Muslim world aware of the reality of Islam, and undertake timely precautionary measures against this religion of terror, hatred and mayhem. We tell the world that the ongoing terrorism, unleashed by Islamic militants, is not an aberration from the so-called 'peaceful religion of Islam'; instead, it is the real Islam preached and practiced by its founder, Prophet Muhammad. A thorough study of the Qur'an and prophetic tradition (Hadith, Sunnah) makes that obvious.

We, therefore, have launched this website to expose the "real Islam"—the Islam that is determined to replace the modern civilization with the 7th-century Arab Bedouin barbarism, peddled by Muslims as the true Islamic Civilization. Let the world watch Islam through www.islam-watch.org and be warned.

Now, concerning the Crusades, Obama was quick to point out, killing in the Name of Christ.

But it seems he did forget the whole story, and the reason the Crusades surfaced. Something I was aware of in grade school.

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Trumps twisted rationale, thinking he could win the presidency, by attempting every repulsive tactic, racial insult, misogynist remark, poking fun at disabled, dissing those who have served militarily, proves beyond a reasonable doubt... the man is bat-shit crazy, out of touch, nuts, stoopid, remarkably naive, deeply mentally disturbed.

 

The GOP will take years to live down the clownish moron Donald Trump...

THE CHILD MOLESTER WHO WANTS TO MAKE CHILD MOLESTING GREAT AGAIN.

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