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I see all of these libs  joining the presidential race ,   there is no trump on their side so they will lose to the  Donald  ( MR PRESIDENT )

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For the new guys , this is a conservatives only thread,,,  

 

No Racist posts at all,  

 

No liberals here at all ,  It will be inforced !!!

 

Bring the news of the day !!

 

 

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Who is running for president? Here's a list of the candidates who have declared so far

William Cummings, USA TODAY Published 8:38 p.m. ET Jan. 27, 2019 | Updated 4:06 p.m. ET Feb. 10, 2019
     
 
 
President Trump arrives for a campaign rally at the County War Memorial Coliseum on Nov. 5, 2018, in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

President Trump arrives for a campaign rally at the County War Memorial Coliseum on Nov. 5, 2018, in Fort Wayne, Indiana. (Photo: Aaron P. Bernstein, Getty Images)

 

The Iowa caucuses are about a year away, which means those planning to join what promises to be a crowded 2020 presidential campaign field are beginning to formally announce their candidacies. 

From former Vice President Joe Biden to failed 2018 Texas Senate candidate Rep. Beto O'Rourke, speculation abounds about the wide field of potential Democratic candidates. 

And there's always the chance of a Republican emerging to challenge President Donald Trump in the primary or a third party candidate emerging in the general election. John Kasich, a former Ohio governor and fierce critic of Trump, has hinted he is considering both of those options. 

There's also the chance for a wild card, too. Will Bernie Sanders give it another go? What about Howard Schultz?

Here's a breakdown of the people who have taken steps toward or officially announced their candidacies.

Cory Booker

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker announced his long-anticipated decision the same way many Americans have come to know him, on Twitter, presenting himself as a healer of the country’s deep divisions and stressing the importance of "collective action."

"I believe that we can build a country where no one is forgotten, no one is left behind," Booker, 49, told his supporters in a rousing, 2-minute-and-25-second video.

Booker came to prominence as the mayor of Newark and then as New Jersey’s first African-American senator after winning a special election in 2013. Booker can point to a record of backing liberal policies, from marriage equality and abortion rights to marijuana legalization and criminal-justice reform.

Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ) is joining the crowd of Democrats in the run for presidency in 2020. Here are 5 things you should know about the New Jersey senator. USA TODAY

Pete Buttigieg

Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, launched his campaign for president with a video message promising to bring a "fresh start" to the White House.

The 37-year-old Democrat would be the first openly gay presidential nominee from a major political party if he manages to emerge victorious in the primary.

Buttigieg was elected South Bend's mayor in 2012. In his campaign video, he points to national headlines that once called it a dying city. He led South Bend's 100,000 residents to a comeback, he said, "by taking our eyes off the rear-view mirror."

South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg is considered a popular young leader in the national Democratic Party. Here's why. Dwight Adams/IndyStar

Julian Castro 

The former San Antonio mayor, who also served as secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development in the Obama administration, threw his hat into the ring early, announcing the formation of an exploratory committee in mid-December and formally declaring his candidacy on Jan. 12. 

Castro, 44, made a splash six years ago as the keynote speaker at the Democratic National Convention in 2012. The grandson of a Mexican immigrant and son of a Latina activist, he would be among the youngest candidates in the field and the most prominent Latino. His twin brother, Joaquin Castro, is a Democratic congressman from Texas. 

 
 
Julian Castro announces 2020 bid for president
 
 
 

John Delaney

You may not have heard of Maryland Rep. John Delaney, but he's been a 2020 presidential candidate since July 2017. 

Delaney, who founded two publicly traded companies, joined the House in 2013. He said his campaign will be focused on building up infrastructure to keep the U.S. globally competitive, along with international tax reform and a greater embrace of immigration.

Tulsi Gabbard

Rep. Gabbard first announced on CNN  in January that she had decided to run for president before officially launching her campaign with a speech in Oahu, Hawaii, on Feb. 2. 

"When we raise our right hand and volunteer to serve, we set aside our own interests to serve our country, to fight for all Americans. We serve as one, indivisible, united, unbreakable – united by this bond of love for each other and love for our country," she said in her Oahu speech. "It is in this spirit that today I announce my candidacy for president of the United States of America."

The Hawaii congresswoman was elected in 2012. An Iraq veteran, Gabbard, 37, serves on the House Armed Services Committee and House Foreign Affairs Committee.

The congresswoman from Hawaii is joining a growing pool of Democrats ready to take on President Trump in 2020. Here are 5 things to know about Rep. Tulsi Gabbard. USA TODAY

Kirsten Gillibrand 

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, a New York Democrat, launched her campaign for the nation's highest office on Jan. 15, on CBS' Late Show with Stephen Colbert, telling the late-night comedian she would file to create an exploratory 2020 committee.

In a clip released by CBS, Gillibrand said she would run a campaign that emphasizes health care as a human right, improving public schools and improving job-training programs.

“I’m going to run for president of the United States because as a young mom, I’m going to fight for other people’s kids as hard as I fight for my own," she told Colbert.

 

Kirsten Gillibrand announces 2020 run AP

Kamala Harris 

Sen. Kamala Harris of California made her announcement on Jan. 21 during an interview on ABC's "Good Morning America" and, six days later, formally opened her campaign with a rally in her hometown of Oakland, California.

"I feel a sense of responsibility to stand up for who we are," she said.

Harris, 54, was born and raised in Oakland. In 2017, Harris, whose mother emigrated to the USA from India, became the first South Asian-American, and the second African-American female, senator in U.S. history, according to her biography on her Senate page.

 
 
Photos: Sen. Kamala Harris in Des Moines
 
 
 

Amy Klobuchar

Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar threw her hat in the ring at an outdoor event on a freezing afternoon in Minneapolis on Feb. 10. 

Klobuchar, 58, hopes her working-class, Midwestern background will help her seize the middle ground in a Democratic primary where many of the candidates who have announced so far have generally appealed to the party's progressive wing.

"I don't come from money. But what I do have is this: I have grit. I have family. I have friends. I have neighbors. I have all of you who are willing to come out in the middle of the winter, all of you who took the time to watch us today from home, all of you who are willing to stand up and say people matter," she said as she announced her candidacy with temperatures hovering in the high teens.

I stand before you as the granddaughter of an iron ore miner, the daughter of a teacher and a newspaperman, the first woman elected to the United States Senate from the State of Minnesota, to announce my candidacy for President of the United States. pic.twitter.com/mNmvFQOJ5V

— Amy Klobuchar (@amyklobuchar) February 10, 2019

Elizabeth Warren 

The two-term Massachusetts senator formally launched her 2020 campaign at a Feb. 9 rally in her home state after becoming one of the first candidates to form an exploratory committee in December. 

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, 69, came into the national spotlight for her passionate criticism of Wall Street, the banking industry and large corporations after the 2008 financial crisis hit. Then-Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid appointed her the chair on a panel to oversee the federal bailout in response to the crisis. 

Warren won her Senate seat in 2012, defeating incumbent Republican Scott Brown and handily won re-election in 2018. A leader of her party's liberal wing, she has advocated for progressive policies such as "Medicare for all." 

 
 
Sen. Elizabeth Warren announces run for the White House in 2020
 
 
 

Andrew Yang

Entrepreneur Andrew Yang, 44, is making a longshot bid for the White House on a platform focused on addressing the threat posed to American jobs by new technology. 

"It became clear to me that job creation will not outpace the massive impending job loss due to automation. Those days are simply over," he says in his biography on his campaign website. "Once I understood the magnitude of this problem, and that even our most forward-thinking politicians were not going to take the steps necessary to stem the tide, I had no choice but to act." 

Yang's platform also includes providing every American 18 and older with a basic universal income of $1,000 a month. 

President Donald Trump

Trump filed for re-election the day he was inaugurated, and his campaign already has raised $100 million and begun airing TV and digital ads. He has said he intends to keep Vice President Mike Pence on the ticket. So far, no Republicans have emerged to challenge the president in the primary. 

Who's out? 

  • Former West Virginia state Sen. Richard Ojeda dropped out of the race on Jan. 25, 2019, telling supporters he didn't want them donating money to a campaign with little chance of success.

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Do any of these Idiots have a chance at all ?

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The Ugly Truth About Cory Booker, New Jersey’s Golden Boy

Corruption scandals. Skyrocketing crime. Abandoned allies. There are reasons why New Jersey is lukewarm about its own Sen. Cory Booker—even while the rest of the country swoons.

 
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It’s eight o’clock on a Sunday night in Jersey City, and for the first time this October it’s cold enough to see your breath in front of you with a deep exhale of the Hudson River air. It’s curious, given that, to see a group of a few dozen residents and visitors from neighboring towns assembled in a parking lot next to the train station—while the New York Giants are playing, no less. The workout-gear-clad mayor, Steven Fulop, is hopping up and down with his arms crossed over his chest for warmth, asking me when I think “he” will arrive.

He would be Cory Booker, who has promised to lead a campaign jog to a local ice cream parlor.

Ah, that explains the crowd.

Formerly the mayor of nearby Newark—the state’s largest urban enclave—and the only United States senator most New Jerseyans under 30 could pick out of a lineup, Booker is, it would seem, a little bit behind schedule. Not that these people care.

Booker is friends with Oprah and Spike Lee. He saves the helpless from burning buildings and puppies from untimely deaths. He shovels residents out of their driveways when it snows and tackles muggers with the graceful force of a former All-American tight end (which he is, of course). And for the past year, Booker has been in Washington, posting selfies with his fellow federal lawmakers and vowing to reform the criminal-justice system. For all anyone knows, Booker is out on the turnpike right now stopping two semi-trucks from colliding with each other through the sheer power of his charisma.

What’s more, Booker has once again found himself challenged by a Republican candidate who seems like he does not even want to win—a gold standard-obsessed former Reagan speechwriter named Jeff Bell, who has not lived in the Garden State for thirty years, is rumored to be running his campaign operation out of a hotel lobby, and whose idea of an attractive platform is to attack unmarried women for skewing left-wing because they are dependent on food stamps.

Yet Booker is actually having to put up a fight to be more than just a congressional seat-warmer.

The alleged FBI and U.S. Attorney investigations into the Newark Watershed may have something to do with that. Months after he first entered the Senate, the New Jersey comptroller alleged that under Booker’s watch—or, more likely, because he was not watching—corruption ran rampant at a publicly funded water-treatment and reservoir-management agency, where Booker’s former law partner served as counsel. And speaking of his former law career: Despite having resigned from his law firm once entering the mayor’s office, Booker received annual payments until 2011, during which time the firm was profiting handsomely off of Brick City. That would be the Brick City that Booker professed to love with the fire of a thousand suns, but did little to fundamentally change. Murder, violent crime, unemployment, and taxes all rose dramatically under his stewardship.

So even though it seems plausible that Bell is a Democratic plant sent to further weaken the Republican Party in New Jersey, Booker—celebrity, super hero, motivational tweeter—is barely polling above 50 percent.

Booker finally materializes—the tall, shadowy figure that appears amid the red and blue lights of the police vehicles lining the perimeter of the parking lot. He wears a black Under Armour T-shirt, red basketball shorts, sneakers, and white socks hiked up to his calves. He approaches the crowd which is—by virtue of his magnetic charm, or the light reflected off his toothy grin—already being pulled in his direction, where it forms a circle around him and Fulop.

“Steve is trying to make this into a political campaign speech about policy. I just want to run for a while and find some ice cream at the end to balance out the calorie intake and ex-take,” Booker jokes. Everyone laughs just a little too hard. “In Washington, it’s really exciting to be about the 21st—I think The Wall Street Journal said I was the 21st mayor in American history to go straight from being mayor to being a United States senator. There’s not that many folks with a perspective that you get from having to govern an urban area. When you’re a mayor, the great thing about it is, you’re very, very pragmatic. It’s not about right or left, it really is about, ‘How can I pull people together to get things done?’”

Booker began trying to answer that question in 2002, when he challenged the incumbent mayor of Newark: Sharpe James, a gap-toothed, gold-chain-wearing caricature of a corrupt, urban New Jersey politician. James defended his decades-long rule of Brick City by using Booker’s made-for-campaign-literature biography against him.

Having been born in the late ’60s, Booker was young—maybe too young. He was raised in the white, leafy upper-class New Jersey suburb of Harrington Park—about an hour’s drive from Newark. Star football player, star student. Sailed off to Stanford, then Oxford—as a Rhodes Scholar—then Yale Law. And while attending the latter, in 1995, he moved into a housing project in Newark because, he said, he wanted to help the community. To James, and to his disciples—of which there were many—Booker was not like them. He was an outsider. A phony. James went as far as to call him an insufficiently black (his grandmother was white) Jewish (Baptist, actually, but served as copresident of a Jewish students group at Oxford) “Republican who took money from the KKK” (source unknown).

Booker lost, but in doing so, won: He starred in Street Fight, a documentary about the campaign, which received high praise from critics and an Oscar nomination. When he returned to challenge James in 2006, he was a celebrity with a chip on his shoulder. James dropped out of the race, and Booker strutted into office at 920 Broad Street with 72 percent of the vote. James would go onto be indicted on 33 counts of fraud—including charging the city credit cards with $58,000 in personal expenses—just like every other Newark mayor had been in the previous 45 years. Booker—who got elected by promising to improve safety through investing in the police department and bring accountability back to the city which for so long was plagued by mismanagement—would be different. Booker would nurse Newark’s wheezing, decaying body back to health. On Election Night, he beamed: “This is the beginning of a new chapter in the life of our city.”

Booker was no stranger to heroics. At Stanford, so the story goes, he talked a suicidal student down from a roof. While on the Newark City Council, beginning in 1998, he started engaging in the sort of stunts that would ultimately lead to his self-mythologization: living in a motorhome on a drug-ravaged street corner, and embarking on a 10-day hunger strike to bring attention to the projects.

But a new chapter in the life of Newark? Because of this one dude who quotes Gandhi?

Newark had never fully recovered from the 1967 riots, precipitated by brutality handed down from white police officers to black residents, which left over two dozen dead, hundreds injured, and caused millions of dollars in damages. In the subsequent four decades, the place had been headed by just three separate mayors. When Booker assumed office, his half-a-million constituents were grappling with high unemployment and rampant poverty. Violent crime was such that keeping the number of annual murders below 100 was a goal. Brick City was a sick place and it was creating the sort of sick people who would rape a pitbull puppy, like a man at a local housing project had, and brag about it around town.

It would have been unrealistic and unfair to expect Booker to improve everything—but he seemed to be asking to be held to such standards. “I’d gladly take a grenade,” he’d say, “if it meant saving this city.” Booker was on a “mission” and he wanted everyone to know that not only did he think it was possible to fix Newark, but with him leading the charge, such turnaround was inevitable.

Booker made himself available to his constituents—through social media, by phone, on the street late at night—and when they sounded the Booker-signal, he would personally address their problems. Cat in the tree? He would get it down. Car stuck in the snow? He would shovel you out. Dog freezing to death outside somewhere? He would warm it up. Natural disaster ruined Halloween for your kids? He would give them candy. Dying in a fire? He would carry you to safety.

But much like how giving change to panhandlers will not solve poverty, Booker’s good deeds were not fundamentally changing Newark. Despite ushering in hundreds of millions of dollars in philanthropic donations to the city, and commissioning cosmetic surgery on public parks, Newark seemed no better off under Booker than it had been under James. Having vowed to strengthen the police department, he instead cut it by 13 percent to help balance the city’s budget. Homicides and violent crime spiked dramatically. Unemployment rose and child poverty increased 32 percent. And all of this came at a price of a 20 percent tax hike for the city’s residents.

Few outside of Newark noticed. Booker’s star was rising: Over a million Twitter followers, and half a million fans on Facebook. After saving his neighbor from a blaze (having shut down three of Newark’s fire companies, perhaps no one else was around to do it) Ellen Degeneres invited him on her show to gift him with a Superman costume. He frequently traveled outside of the state (in one year, he was gone about a quarter of the time) to give speeches—nearly 100 in total, including 10 commencement speeches, at Stanford, Brandeis, Williams College, Bard College, Pitzer College, Columbia University’s Teachers College, Suffolk University Law School, New York Law School, Washington University, and Ramapo College. For his oratory work he was paid over $1.3 million (a significant amount of which he donated to charity).

All the while, from 2006 to 2011, Booker was still receiving annual payments, which totaled close to $700,000, from his former law firm—Trenk, DiPasquale, Webster—from which he had resigned once elected mayor to avoid “the appearance of impropriety.” Booker’s campaign spokeswoman, Silvia Alvarez, told me: “He was paid out by the firm as part of his separation agreement for work he performed before he became mayor.” OK, sure, but while Booker was profiting from the firm, they were profiting from Newark: over $2 million in work for Newark’s Housing Authority, the Watershed Conservation Development Corporation, and a wastewater agency. “That’s almost like Sharpe James-type Bad word,” one New Jersey Democratic operative offered.

But even if it were Sharpe James-type Bad word, it could never overshadow the Cory Booker-type Bad word that made him so beloved: his sincere delivery of corny tropes about Believing In Yourself and Finding The Good In Others, his knack for remembering names, and his Clintonian ability to connect with any and every individual who makes contact with his big, hazel eyes—be they a drug addict, a hedge-fund manager, or a small child staring up at his 6’3” frame like he is some holy cross between LeBron James and Zeus. It was always assumed that Booker would be moving on to something bigger than Newark—to the governor’s mansion, it seemed obvious, but then that didn’t look like such a great idea: The fall before Chris Christie’s reelection campaign brought Hurricane Sandy, and with it, approval ratings so high for him that Jesus Christ himself could have sailed down from the heavens and won the Democratic nomination, only to be stomped out by Christie come Election Day.

Booker was not going to be the Democrats’ sacrificial lamb—but he could be their senator.

Having been there for five terms, the prickly Frank Lautenberg was not expected—at 88 years old—to run another campaign for the Senate. Out of decency, or the political need to at least appear decent, all would-be candidates waited until the ailing lawmaker announced he would not seek reelection to mount their own campaigns—well, all but Booker, who allegedly refused to let Lautenberg fade nobly into the sunset and instead stared him down in his weakened state to let him know who the boss was.

With Lautenberg somewhere in the ether, Christie scheduled a special election (at a cost of $24 million to taxpayers) for October 16th. This left Booker’s primary opponents—Assemblywoman Sheila Oliver and two old, white congressmen: the noodle-limbed, sleepy-eyed Frank Pallone and the odd, quiet nuclear physicist Rush Holt—just four months to make their own cases to voters, never mind one against Booker. Besides, there was the fear that any criticism of Booker's record in Newark would be misinterpreted as a criticism of Newark itself—his identity and his progress as a politician being inextricably linked with that of the city and its residents.

To complicate matters further, the only people who seemed to have any desire to go after Booker were of the conspiracy-theory ilk. Charles C. Johnson, then a writer for The Daily Caller but more recently known for questioning beheaded journalist James Foley’s patriotism and fear-mongering over Ebola, published a thinly sourced story that claimed Booker had never even lived in Newark—which some had long suspected, but—like many things assumed to be true in New Jersey politics—none had been able to prove. Others sunk as low as to question Booker’s sexuality.

“You almost sound like you’re a birther if you say anything about him,” said one New Jersey Democratic operative. “Who could have possibly made the argument, ‘You know something, Cory? You’ve been a lousy mayor. You know something, Cory? You took a kickback.’ How could you have possibly done that without causing a pop-culture calamity?”

“It would have been a hit against popular culture. The guy has been lionized as this mythological figure who saves old people from burning buildings and shovels snow—how could that have not reverberated throughout more than just political culture if you did an all-out assault on him? It would be like kicking the puppy that he rescued.”

Things only got easier for Booker after he won the Democratic nomination. His Republican opponent, Steve Lonegan, was a legally blind yet racially insensitive anti-immigration zealot whose flack ranted to a reporter that Booker interacted with a stripper on Twitter in a manner fitting of “a gay guy.” Somehow, this did not endear Lonegan to voters, and Booker officially entered the Senate on Oct. 31st.

Back in Jersey City, Booker is still talking in the parking lot. He scans the crowd as he speaks, making eye contact with each person individually. He even looks down to address a toddler who is noisily playing in a red wagon. “I’m really excited about the opportunity to be New Jersey’s United States senator—not just for eleven months, like I’ve been now, but have a full term of six years.”

Since his election, Booker has been taking a page from the playbook of superstar senators before him, like Al Franken and Hillary Clinton, by keeping his head down. He has submitted to few interviews, but remains ever-visible on social media. His central senatorial “achievement,” if you want to call it that, is the introduction of the REDEEM Act—an overhaul of the criminal-justice system that would encourage states to address the cycle of incarceration and recidivism by reforming how juveniles are dealt with, and to make it easier for people with criminal records to get jobs.

Booker introduced the bill, along with Republican Sen. Rand Paul, in July. But strangely, Booker didn’t seem to get behind his own legislation. When it came time to publicize the proposal, one senior Republican operative with knowledge of the situation told me, Booker wasn’t “overly comfortable jumping out and having the spotlight put on him.” Miscommunication between Booker and Paul’s camps led to the nixing of the original PR plan, which was to do a full-on media blitz to promote their ideas. Instead, Booker took softballs during a cocktail event, sponsored by Bank of America. “I don’t know why you’d give up a whole slew of interviews, including dominating the Sunday talk show circuit, in favor of doing a Mike Allen Politico briefing,” the operative said. “I don’t know why you’d do that unless you’re worried about the person asking you the questions.”

Meanwhile, it looked as though Booker’s record in Newark might be catching up with him. As mayor, he presided over and strengthened the Newark Watershed Conservation Development Corporation—a publicly funded entity that managed the city’s reservoirs and treated water for its residents. Pretty boring stuff. But a state audit by the comptroller’s office found that the agency’s director, Linda Watkins-Brashear, was a donor and close ally of Booker’s, was using the Watershed like her own personal bank account—paying herself $1.98 million over seven years, when her salary came to just $1.16 million. The also doled out millions in no-bid contracts to her friends and husband. Further, Booker’s former law partner, Elnardo Webster, had been acting as the Watershed’s counsel—and his firm had profited $212,318. “He had nothing to do with the business the firm conducted with the Watershed,” Booker’s spokeswoman, Silvia Alvarez, told me.

Not quite Chinatown, but in a city where police were being fired by the dozens, millions of taxpayer dollars lost due to a lack of oversight is no small mistake. Which is not to say that blame for the corruption should be placed solely at Booker’s feet—but the the comptroller’s office noted in their report that the mayor did not attend a single meeting regarding the agency. He instead sent a business administrator in his place, and then when the administrator resigned, in 2010, Booker never replaced them. He had no time to go to the meetings, he said. Never mind that a dearth of free time never seemed to get in the way of a commencement address, or a talk-show appearance, or a social-media stunt.

According to reports by The Star-Ledger and New York Post, the Watershed is being investigated by both the U.S. Attorney and the FBI. “The senator has not been contacted by the authorities,” Alvarez said, adding that he is only aware of the investigations “now, because it has been reported in the press.” In a recent interview with NJTV, Booker called the Watershed, “one of the big policy losses that I had in Newark.”

The police vehicles take off from the parking lot with Booker and Fulop in tow. Some supporters keep pace, and others trail behind walking, there to observe Booker in the flesh more than for the cardio. “He’s the hardest working senator there,” Donna Streeter, a middle-aged woman from New Brunswick tells me. She has brought her two teenaged children with her to see the man she says inspired her to care about politics. Streeter thinks Booker should challenge Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination in 2016. “I think he’s ready. He’s qualified,” she says, slightly out of breath.

First, Booker will have to get past Bell, who arrived back in the Garden State in February following 30 years spent in Fairfax, Virginia. Bell worked in both the Nixon and Reagan administrations. His platform mostly consists of his desire to return to the gold standard—something polls show New Jersey residents do not care about—but he sometimes pivots to foreign policy (he’s a neocon) and his disdain for the welfare state.

On a sunny afternoon in late September, I traveled to Bell’s brother’s home in Fort Lee (of Bridgegate fame) to interview the candidate. He answered the door—bespectacled and tall, with shoulders so large and exacerbated by his out-of-date blazer that it looks as though he is being carried around by a clothes hanger—and stepped outside with palms facing forward, as if he thought he was about to be shot. Everything that occurred beyond the door, he said—the entire interview—would have to be off the record.

All of that, and the fact that hardly anyone within the state knows who the hell Bell is, and Booker is only polling modestly. After hovering around 42 percent all summer, with a Senate approval rating of 47 percent, Booker only just cracked 50 percent in a Monmouth University poll.

Inside Torico Ice Cream on Erie Street, Booker is standing among his supporters, a white towel draped over his neck absorbing the sweat dripping down from his shiny, bald head. He gracefully lifts a little boy in the air and poses for a picture. He answers every selfie request, as it’s an art he has perfected. He grasps the phone in his capable hand, outstretches his long arm toward the ceiling, and angles it down just so.

Booker jumps behind the counter and begins scooping the ice cream himself, serving it to anyone who wants it, or just happens to be there—children, voters, his former intern. He shouts across the room to ask if he can make me some. Looking around, it’s difficult to not notice that everybody else who had to be there to put in their hours of retail politics—Mayor Fulop among them—had left long ago.

A man in the crowd asks Booker about the Senate. “There’s a little more job security right here,” he laughs.

 

https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-ugly-truth-about-cory-booker-new-jerseys-golden-boy

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Looks like booker is a criminal and lies like obama ,,,  well maybe poka hontas  lies more

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I love a bumped thread !

 

To paraphrase Ben Shapiro: Cory Booker couldn't even run Newark....how is going to run America ?

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Here we go with this thread again. Read the first post, more specifically my image in the first post. Then read the whole thread and you'll see every thing I set out to do with this thread comes constantly true. Every thing I said I would do I do. There are zero surprises here. Liberals have an entire sub-forum at this site conservatives are not welcome in, and I'm fine with that. Conservatives have a single thread liberals are not welcome to and the left has buku problems with that. Could they be more hypocritical? One of the reasons I started this thread is to point out the hypocrisy of the left, I told them I was gonna do this and why, I told them exactly what was gonna happen, and still they take the bait.

 

The left are mutha fu(kin morons and this thread more than anything cept for The Mighty Horse Thread clearly illustrates this.

 

I mean, what the fu(k? Conservatives go to the Liberals Only Room and get gigged. It says so in the rules. I, teacher, admin, put bludog in charge of the Liberals Only Room and whole heartedly support his reign. Even I am not allowed to post there, though I do try now and again. I get yelled at just like the rest of you do. Do you see any conservatives complaining about this? Same thing here only the other way around and the snowflakes scream bloody fu(kin murder. Turn about is not fair play. What is good for the goose is not good for the gander.

 

Fu(k the media, fu(k the politicians, fu(k the talking heads, fu(k anyone you can think of. How does this thread at this site the way I've set it up not more clearly illustrate the hypocrisy of the left? And I told the left what would happen as I did this to them and still they b!tch, moan and curse the God they don't believe in.

 

Folks, this is my genius at work, make no bones about it. And it shall go on. they still gonna come, they still gonna get thier posts edited to say "I'm gay," or if they are gay "I'm straight." What the fu(k do I care?  I'll find a way to insult them.

 

"Hey, you liberal, go stick this bulls eye to your chest and go stand way over there at the end of this shooting range and wait to see what happens."

 

"Okay."

 

 

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9 minutes ago, Old Mack said:

I love a bumped thread !

 

To paraphrase Ben Shapiro: Cory Booker couldn't even run Newark....how is going to run America ?

Welcome back bro,  Cory is a criminal,,,,,,, He is a racist too

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3 minutes ago, teacher said:

Here we go with this thread again. Read the first post, more specifically my image in the first post. Then read the whole thread and you'll see every thing I set out to do with this thread comes constantly true. Every thing I said I would do I do. There are zero surprises here. Liberals have an entire sub-forum at this site conservatives are not welcome in, and I'm fine with that. Conservatives have a single thread liberals are not welcome to and the left has buku problems with that. Could they be more hypocritical? One of the reasons I started this thread is to point out the hypocrisy of the left, I told them I was gonna do this and why, I told them exactly what was gonna happen, and still they take the bait.

 

The left are mutha fu(kin morons and this thread more than anything cept for The Mighty Horse Thread clearly illustrates this.

 

I mean, what the fu(k? Conservatives go to the Liberals Only Room and get gigged. It says so in the rules. I, teacher, admin, put bludog in charge of the Liberals Only Room and whole heartedly support his reign. Even I am not allowed to post there, though I do try now and again. I get yelled at just like the rest of you do. Do you see any conservatives complaining about this? Same thing here only the other way around and the snowflakes scream bloody fu(kin murder. Turn about is not fair play. What is good for the goose is not good for the gander.

 

Fu(k the media, fu(k the politicians, fu(k the talking heads, fu(k anyone you can think of. How does this thread at this site the way I've set it up not more clearly illustrate the hypocrisy of the left? And I told the left what would happen as I did this to them and still they b!tch, moan and curse the God they don't believe in.

 

Folks, this is my genius at work, make no bones about it. And it shall go on. they still gonna come, they still gonna get thier posts edited to say "I'm gay," or if they are gay "I'm straight." What the fu(k do I care?  I'll find a way to insult them.

 

"Hey, you liberal, go stick this bulls eye to your chest and go stand way over there at the end of this shooting range and wait to see what happens."

 

"Okay."

 

 

amen

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David Duke a Long-Time Liberal, Democratic Racist

 
The Big Lie has become quite tiresome to debunk.

I have written countless times, and more well-known and well-connected pundits have shared that the Democratic Party is the part of racists, progressives, of Nazis, of white supremacy.

The media continue to push the false narrative that the current rally going down in Charlottesville or in Washington DC is a "Unite the Rally." Sure, that's what David Duke, Patrick Little, Richard Spencer, and Jason Kessler want to call it.

I have already written at length about Richard Spender and the rest of the other speakers.

Now let's focus on David Duke.

This guy is not a Republican. He does not belong to the right in any way.

He is a statist, and he is a leftist, although he clings to pushing "white nationalism" and white supremacy instead of embracing the multicultural, left-wing, social justice warrior talking points of La Raza and Black Lives Matter.

What we say in Charlottesville, and what we are seeing a racialist civil war among the socialists in our midst.

Let's talk about David Duke.

This guy is a well-known white supremacist.

What the media and the Democratic Party don't want to talk about, however, is that he is a life-long Democrat, not a Republican, and definitely not among the right.

Check out Wikipedia for starters, which lists his many party affiliations, mostly with the Democratic Party, but not nearly as much with the Republican Party.
 
David%2BDuke%2BPolitical%2BParties.PNG

Notice that he joined the Nazi Party before he joined the Democratic Party. What a surprise!

Notice also that his association with the Republican Party has been demonstrably fleeting, but also quite failing.

Let's take a surface view of his bids for office:
 
David%2BDuke%2BEarly%2BBids%2Bfor%2BOffice.PNG

Not once but twice he ran as a Democrat.

Right away, Duke and his white supremacist rhetoric belies that whole "Big Switch" fraud pushed by the Democratic Party, that the Democratic Party had abandoned its racist ways and then the Republicans took it over.

Notice that these elections took place after the Nixon era, when many progressive revisionists claim that the two parties began switching, with Richard Nixon appealing to racist sentiment in a so-called Southern Strategy.

Duke also ran for President ... as a Democrat!
 
David%2BDuke%2BBid%2Bfor%2BPresident.PNG

Duke ran on the Democratic label as long as he could, and for the record he has been a Democrat much longer than he has been a Republican.

Indeed, he did run and win office as a Republican twice.

He was elected to the Louisiana State Legislature.

When he ran for Governor in 1991, as a Republican, he claimed -- to the New York Times, no less--that he had disavowed his views on white supremacy, anti-Semitism, and Nazism.

Check out one quote here:
 
To hear Mr. Duke, the unity is cultural and benign, a love for Western Christian civilization that took him on a dark detour to Ku Klux Klan and Nazi activities he now disavows. "The common strain is my love for Western civilization," he said. "That's what I've always been about."

 
With this line of rhetoric, he had gotten elected as a Republican in the two statehouse races. Any hint or tint of racism did not propel his two victories to office.
 
Nobody trusted him, and Republican Party leaders up and down the ticket rejected his bid for office. A Democrat became governor in 1991, but then Republicans began sweeping the statewide offices after that.
 
The Republican Party was overtaking elected offices throughout the South as the region had become less racist and more prosperous.
 
From 1999 onward, Duke's affiliation has been a mystery.
 
Then all of a sudden, nearly twenty years later, he jumped back into the media forefront, trying to tack himself onto President Trump's agenda of pro-American populist conservatism.
 
Once again, the media deliberately smears and muddies the different political policies and affiliations. Supporting one's nation is not fascism, nor is it necessarily socialism. A love for Western Civilization cannot reasonably include segregationism, racism, or any form of reckless statism.
 
David Duke wants authoritarian government, anti-Semitism, and white supremacy. Any form of racialist policies go against the Western tradition, which instructs and promotes the respect for individuals regardless of their ethnic background or cultural legacies.
 
The voters in Louisiana and throughout the country were right not to trust Duke then. He had not shed his hateful beliefs. A quick look at his current website says it all.
 
Oh, and when Duke ran for US Senate as a Republican, the Republican voters don't want him.

Check out how poorly he did in the US Senate Race in Louisiana, when he advertised himself a "Republican" despite his long, racist DEMOCRATIC past:
 
Louisiana%2BUS%2BSenate%2BRace%2B2016.PNG


Oh, and just to assure everyone that the Republicans are more interested in supporting the truth rather than trashy, terrible candidates, then-candidate Donald Trump went on record declaring that if David Duke ended up as the Republican nominee for US Senate in 2016, Trump was ready to endorse the Democrat in the race.

Yes, and this comes from Roll Call.

As recently as 2017, Duke supported radical Muslim Keith Ellison's bid to become the Democratic National Committee Chairman:

 
David Duke wants the world to know that he supports Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison’s attempt to become the next chairman of the Democratic National Committee.

 
The former leader of the Ku Klux Klan likely complicated Mr. Ellison’s professional goals Monday by backing his efforts while alluding to claims by critics that he is anti-Semitic.

 
Why? Because Ellison is an anti-Semite, just like Duke.
 
Notice once against the closer kinship with the Democratic Party.
 
 
And really, there should be no surprise here:
 
Democrat%2Band%2BStars%2Band%2BBars.jpg
 
Democratic%2BClub%2Bof%2BSeattle%2BSupports%2BRacist.jpg
 
democratic-party-campaign-poster%2Bnegro.png
 
Lyndon%2BJohnson%2BJracism%2Bniggers%2Bvoting%2BDemocrat.jpg
 
Racist%2BCalifornia%2BDemocrats.jpg
 
The%2BRacism%2Band%2BHatred%2Bof%2Bthe%2BDemocratic%2BParty.jpg
 
 
So, the final question sets in: why does Duke insist on identifying himself with the Republican Party, since he has been routinely rejected by GOP leadership and does not get their support in any way?
 
Neo-Nazis, anti-Semites, and white supremacists will get no action, traction, or attention if they run under the Democratic Party aegis. The left-wing media will not allow their carefully-crafted narrative to be destroyed so easily.
 
Left-wing shills like Richard Spencer, Jason Kessler, and even David Duke know that they will get lots of attention if they claim to be right-wing, if they identify as Republicans. The media love to push that left-wing narrative and they use these trolls to foment this hatred.
 
But it's all bogus, unsubstantiated lies.
 
David Duke is another liberal fraud, a white supremacist hatemonger who started with and still belongs to the Democratic Party.
 
Will%2BQuigg%2BKKK%2BEndorses%2BHillary%2BClinton.jpg

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I learned a new word the other day while reading about Trumps speech:

 

won·ky /ˈwäNGkē/

 

adjective

 

A: crooked; off-center; askew.

 

B: preoccupied with arcane details. 

 

Used in a sentence:

 

Liberals made fun of Trump's wonky red tie that he wore to the State of the Union Address.

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On 2/11/2019 at 6:03 AM, Old Mack said:

I learned a new word the other day while reading about Trumps speech:

 

won·ky /ˈwäNGkē/

 

adjective

 

A: crooked; off-center; askew.

 

B: preoccupied with arcane details. 

 

Used in a sentence:

 

Liberals made fun of Trump's wonky red tie that he wore to the State of the Union Address.

libs like to suck wonky red cock

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You are not allowed in here   5x5  please take your filthy ass out of here........

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20 hours ago, JTZilla said:

You are not allowed in here   5x5  please take your filthy ass out of here........

up my corhole azz

 

 

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five by five has been banned for posting here !!   lol  he cant control himself.

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