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Shot a .50 Caliber Hawken At The Range Today


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Hawken rifle - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  1. Rate of fire User-dependent Muzzle velocity Variable Effective firing range 400 yards Feed system Muzzle loaded Sights Open blade sight

    The Hawken rifle was a muzzle loading rifle built by the Hawken brothers, and used on the prairies and in the Rocky Mountains of the United States during the early frontier days. It has become synonymous with the "plains rifle", the buffalo gun, and the fur trapper's gun. Developed in the 1820s, it was eventually displaced by breechloaders (such as the Sharps rifle) and lever-action rifles which flourished after the Civil War.

    The Hawken "plains rifle" was made by Jacob and Samuel Hawken, in their St. Louis, Missouri shop, which they ran from 1815 to 1858. Their shop continued to operate and sell rifles bearing the "Hawken" name under later owners William S. Hawken, William L. Watt, and J. P. Gemmer, until Gemmer closed down the business and retired in 1915.[1]

    Samuel and Jacob were trained by their father as rifle smiths on the east coast. They moved west and opened a business in St. Louis at the beginning of the Rocky Mountain fur trade.[2] The brothers' claim to fame is the "plains rifles" produced by their shop. They produced what their customers needed in the west, a quality gun, light enough to carry all the time, capable of knocking down big targets at long range.[3] They called their guns "Rocky Mountain Rifles," reflecting their customers: fur trappers, traders and explorers.[4]

     

     

    History[edit]

    The earliest known record of a Hawken rifle dates to 1823 when one was made for William Henry Ashley.[5] The Hawkens did not mass-produce their rifles but rather made each one by hand, one at a time. A number of famous men were said to have owned Hawken rifles, including: Daniel Boone,[6]Jim Bridger, Kit Carson, Orrin Porter Rockwell, Joseph Meek, Jedediah Strong Smith, and Theodore Roosevelt.[7]

    Hawken rifles had a reputation for both accuracy and long range.[6]

    The Hawken rifle company was sold in 1862, and the last rifle actually made by a Hawken was built in 1884.[8] Although popular with mountain men and hunters of the fur trade era, up through the mid part of the 19th century, muzzleloaders were generally replaced by mass-produced, breech-loading weapons such as the Sharps rifle and the Winchester rifle

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Its consider an antique. Whats the year that they say it is antique.

 

Antique and black powder firearms need to be subject to the same laws/regulations as any other firearm. They do the same thing ... .kill people

 

Sale of black powder itself, or any gunpowder, needs to be more restricted.

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Antique and black powder firearms need to be subject to the same laws/regulations as any other firearm. They do the same thing ... .kill people

 

Sale of black powder itself, or any gunpowder, needs to be more restricted.

 

what should we do to hypocrites who commit voter fraud ? which is a felony, that would be YOU

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Its consider an antique. Whats the year that they say it is antique.

wrong again retard

 

dont you ever know anything about anything ?

 

what a pathetic loser... no wonder you libloons support oblamer and trannymums gun laws...

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what type powder ?

 

how much powder ?

 

what type projectile ?

 

how far was the target ?

Not my rifle - owner loaded it - target about 200 yards.

whats nice is you can buy it off the internet, no tax, free shipping,

no entries on government forms, doesnt matter what state.

 

even a lib can buy one

these kits are 379

st-louis-hawken-rifle-kit-original.jpg

The old non lethal black powder rifles. :D

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I have a ( I believe ) Lyman dueling pistol - cap & ball kit. Never finished it. .45 caliber.

Black powder - I guarantee if someone pointed an old Army .44 BP revolver at me and said: " Stand & deliver". I would empty my pockets.

What's fun is the variety of projectiles you can use...

I believe the guy uses a type of mini ball - casts his own. Easily take down the largest animal on land.

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  • I have a Henry 45 70; and it's does jump; but I would like a longer barrel. I think mine is 18 or 19 inch barrel. I've already contacted Henry. For distance, I like 30 + inches. There was a ( actually two ) Winchesters in the family. One was definitely a 45 70 - my first deer. The other was a larger caliber, but I'm not dead sure - maybe a 50 - 110. Both disappeared. Every family has it's bastards.

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Shot many deer with black powder. I had a hard time with it at first.

I have a friend who has a matched set of Colt cap & ball revolvers. Did Colt make a .36 caliber? I think they are .36 calibers. Absolutely beautiful. My first deer with a Winchester 45 70. Had to have been BP ammo - I remember the smoke. The old cartridges were in and out so many times, the slugs were getting bumped back into the brass.

Thought about a Sharps, but $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

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I really enjoy shooting my .50 caliber Knight Wolverine. It's an in-line muzzle loader with a 24" stainless steel Green Mountain barrel on a camo composite body with Truglo fiber optic sights. I shoot 95 grains of Triple Se7en Ffg powder behind a 245-grain ballistic tipped projectile, scoring consistent half-dollar sized 3-shot groups at 100 yards. And it knocks a deer dead as a doornail!

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I have a Henry

When I hit the powerball not only am I going to get a Henry, I'm going to get a ultramega custom one.

 

Are the Henry's all made one rifle at a time ?

 

there great guns I have one lots of fun

Shut up, hippy !

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Yeah I missed the target the first time I shot one. I was young.

The thing with these kinds of rifles, is that one will shoot a particular load with consistent accuracy whereas the same model won't hit the broadside of a barn with it.

When I first bought my smoke pole, the salesman talked me into buying Triple Se7en pellets, as opposed to the actual powder, and 275-grain Powerbelt bullets. I couldn't dial that combination in within four inches at 50 yards! Now, I'm using 245-grain Hornadys and Ffg powder, although it took me a while at the range to figure out the best powder load. And now it is one sweet-shooting muzzy!

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I have a friend who has a matched set of Colt cap & ball revolvers. Did Colt make a .36 caliber? I think they are .36 calibers. Absolutely beautiful. My first deer with a Winchester 45 70. Had to have been BP ammo - I remember the smoke. The old cartridges were in and out so many times, the slugs were getting bumped back into the brass.

 

Thought about a Sharps, but $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

yes to .36

 

you can easily find a sharps for $800 -1200 at a gun show

 

I saw a nice browning with sights for $1500, I kept trying to get it for $1200, it was unfired in box.

 

new for $2000 for a nice one in montana

 

check out the cimarrons,

as301-rockymtnii-wscope-32-45-70-800.jpg

 

I had H&R put a 45 70 "buffalo classic" bbl on my handigun, its cheap.

 

you might also check out the H&R buffalo classic

 

they are nice for the price, nice peep sights too.. if you dont like it I will buy it from you

http://www.budsgunshop.com/catalog/product_info.php/products_id/89043/H%26R+Single+Shot+45-70+w32%22+BarrelCase+Hardened+ReceiverWa

 

89043.jpg

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F

Antique and black powder firearms need to be subject to the same laws/regulations as any other firearm. They do the same thing ... .kill people

 

Sale of black powder itself, or any gunpowder, needs to be more restricted.

[/

 

 

She's right, if I had a fire in my garage...there goes the neighborhood..

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When I hit the powerball not only am I going to get a Henry, I'm going to get a ultramega custom one.

 

Are the Henry's all made one rifle at a time ?

 

 

Shut up, hippy !

My Henry 45 70 cost $700. I believe they are still made in Brooklyn , NY. Must be a real thorn in the asses of the NY anti gun crowd. I guess Henry was there long before the kookaboos.

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