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Missing Plane - Hijacked? Crashed?


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If it was hijacked - wouldn't it still be on ground radar? Same as if it went down. Where is a suitable landing site unknown to our satellite imaging? Jesus - we can count the eyelets in a pair of Converse All Stars from 2 or 3 hundred miles up. I'd think an enormous aircraft would show up. Just me. If it was set down - it will need an enormous strip to take off again with a full load of fuel. Like 30,000 gallons of fuel. All that extra flying had to deplete it's fuel supply.

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If it was hijacked - wouldn't it still be on ground radar? Same as if it went down. Where is a suitable landing site unknown to our satellite imaging? Jesus - we can count the eyelets in a pair of Converse All Stars from 2 or 3 hundred miles up. I'd think an enormous aircraft would show up. Just me. If it was set down - it will need an enormous strip to take off again with a full load of fuel. Like 30,000 gallons of fuel. All that extra flying had to deplete it's fuel supply.

The second day i said "it sounds like a james bond movie script".

I haven't changed my mind since.

I have a bad feeling they wanted the plane for something bigger than 9/11 (they try to out-do themselfs with every "new terror mission").

I shudder to think of what they will plan to do with that 777 plane IF they don't find it before. :)

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Three Mile Island happened after the release of the movie "China syndrome". How many movies were made about the Love Canal? What is that new movie with Liam Nealson, ""Nonstop" or something like that?

 

Humanity is a ruthless whore that will not tolerate insubordination, blasphemy, or treason against ideology and methodology in conducting psychological class warfare. God's Grace is granted to those that never ask questions about real and juist accept reality at masked value protected by theory and theology saving hypothetical possibilities ruling the real moment.

 

That makes academia the coverup, Spirituality the camouflage, politics the punishment, and economics the control mechanism that takes the attention away from arts and entertainment dictating the conversations socially.

 

 

In plane english, I don't care because I cannot do anything about it.

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wouldnt that be cool if they made planes so when the hijackers try to open the hatch, the "pilots pod" launches and the plane deploys the parachutes

 

or

 

there is a "passenger cabin" that ejects from the plane and takes everyone except the pilots

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They were all nuclear scientists on the plane.

How about they went down and sunk.

Nonsense. Nuclear Science is still theoretical physics. How do I know that? they honor clock and calendar time differentials that don't phyically exist other than self invented measurements by one species wishing now wasn't eternity.

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I dont think the plane was taken to put an atomic bomb in it, why draw all that attention ?

 

if you have a bomb, getting a plane would be the easy part

 

from some info I heard it does seem to be a hijacking tho, something about all the cell phones were rounded up and no calls have been made. also...

 

Malaysia Airlines Jet Made 'Tactical Aviation Maneuvers': Law Enforcement Officials

 

U.S. law enforcement and intelligence officials are focusing on the possibility that at least one of the Malaysia Airlines pilots is responsible for the disappearance of flight MH 370 after new information revealed the plane performed “tactical evasion maneuvers” after it disappeared from radar, two senior law enforcement officials told ABC News today.

 

U.S. authorities believe only a person with extensive flight or engineering experience could have executed the maneuvers. They also are suspicious of what appeared to be attempts to evade radar.

 

After the plane’s transponder - which reports the plane’s location and altitude - was turned off about 1:20 a.m. last Saturday, the plane was picked up by military radar as it turned back towards Malaysia and passed above Peninsular Malaysia before heading into the Strait of Malacca.

 

After a week of scrutinizing passengers and the crew, one of the officials said there were no indications anyone besides the pilots had the ability to perform the complicated maneuvers done by the plane. Furthermore, officials said they have found no link between the passengers and known terrorist groups and that the plane could have been flown into a densely populated area if the incident was related to terrorism - but it wasn't.

Another possibility that can’t be ruled out is that the pilots were coerced or made to redirect the plane by force.

 

ABC News aviation expert and former Marine Corps fighter pilot Steve Ganyard said it’s possible that the movements made by the plane could mean it was piloted by amateurs not used to flying at night.

 

Ganyard said a person trying to fly a plane without lights or a horizon could make random turns that may appear to be evasive but were just accidental.

 

“[A hijacker could] tell the pilot 'turn the transponder off' and hold a gun to his head,” said Ganyard. “They could advertently fly out to sea hoping to see some to land to go towards.”

 

Ganyard also noted that the hijackers of United Flight 93 on Sept. 11 raised and lowered the altitude to try and stop the passengers who were storming the cockpit.

 

Earlier in the day, Malaysian police visited the home of Capt. Zaharie Ahmad Shah, the 53-year-old pilot of the missing plane.

 

Shah is a married father of three grown children with more than 18,000 hours of experience in the air. He has been described as an affluent aviation buff, with a home in a gated community that police spent about two hours inside today. The first officer, Fariq Abdul Hamid, 27, joined Malaysia Airlines in 2007 and has 2,000 hours of flying time.

 

In recent days the Malaysian government has been criticized for not sharing information earlier with international investigators.

 

A senior Western law enforcement official told ABC News today that the Malaysian government repeatedly turned down assistance from Interpol to assist in its investigation. That offer has since been repeated several times and declined each time.

 

"It's the old pre-9/11 approach: close-hold information, don't share anything," the official said.

 

A spokeswoman for Interpol declined comment.

 

Law enforcement officials are now worried that critical investigative time has been lost and leads could well have dried up as sources of information could have dispersed in the last week. The FBI also hasn't been invited by the Malaysian government to help on the ground, sources said.

 

"Malaysia Airlines has shared all available information with the relevant authorities since the moment we learned that the aircraft had disappeared," read a statement from the airline. "This is truly an unprecedented situation, for Malaysia Airlines and for the entire aviation industry."

 

Follow All the Latest News on Missing Flight MH 370

 

At a Saturday news conference Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said that the plane was steered off course by someone on board, was airborne for more than seven hours and may have traveled as far as Kazakhstan. He added that although the movements were consistent with deliberate acts, he wouldn't confirm that the plane was hijacked.

 

"We are still investigating all possibilities as to what caused MH370 to deviate from its original flight path," he said.

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Some very very deep water in that area.

 

If I had to make a guess, I would opine that the aircraft was hijacked and is now at the bottom of the Indian Ocean.

 

Agreed. Anyone could deep six it in the Indian and the wreak would be very hard to find in any of the underwater canyons at those depths.

 

However if there was some ultimate purpose they could hide it under something as simple as camo netting as long as the background didn't reflect a different heat signature.

 

I'm thinking either criminal or maybe someone wants to use it as an aerial platform for a nuke or chems.

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Everything seems to point to human cause rather than catastrophic mechanical failure... There was simply no reason to manually turn off the Plane's transponder, yet it was.

 

Now this doesn't 100% mean terrorism, but it is definately one of the possibilities.. Others could be Pilot suicide, or the Plane was Hijacked by some nut without terrorist affiliation for some other reason.

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If I had to make a guess, I would opine that the aircraft was hijacked and is now at the bottom of the Indian Ocean.

Was it hijacked by beardy cavemen with boxcutters?

I dont think the plane was taken to put an atomic bomb in it, why draw all that attention ?

 

if you have a bomb, getting a plane would be the easy part

 

from some info I heard it does seem to be a hijacking tho, something about all the cell phones were rounded up and no calls have been made. also...

 

Malaysia Airlines Jet Made 'Tactical Aviation Maneuvers': Law Enforcement Officials

 

U.S. law enforcement and intelligence officials are focusing on the possibility that at least one of the Malaysia Airlines pilots is responsible for the disappearance of flight MH 370 after new information revealed the plane performed “tactical evasion maneuvers” after it disappeared from radar, two senior law enforcement officials told ABC News today.

 

U.S. authorities believe only a person with extensive flight or engineering experience could have executed the maneuvers. They also are suspicious of what appeared to be attempts to evade radar.

 

After the plane’s transponder - which reports the plane’s location and altitude - was turned off about 1:20 a.m. last Saturday, the plane was picked up by military radar as it turned back towards Malaysia and passed above Peninsular Malaysia before heading into the Strait of Malacca.

 

After a week of scrutinizing passengers and the crew, one of the officials said there were no indications anyone besides the pilots had the ability to perform the complicated maneuvers done by the plane. Furthermore, officials said they have found no link between the passengers and known terrorist groups and that the plane could have been flown into a densely populated area if the incident was related to terrorism - but it wasn't.

Another possibility that can’t be ruled out is that the pilots were coerced or made to redirect the plane by force.

 

ABC News aviation expert and former Marine Corps fighter pilot Steve Ganyard said it’s possible that the movements made by the plane could mean it was piloted by amateurs not used to flying at night.

 

Ganyard said a person trying to fly a plane without lights or a horizon could make random turns that may appear to be evasive but were just accidental.

 

“[A hijacker could] tell the pilot 'turn the transponder off' and hold a gun to his head,” said Ganyard. “They could advertently fly out to sea hoping to see some to land to go towards.”

 

Ganyard also noted that the hijackers of United Flight 93 on Sept. 11 raised and lowered the altitude to try and stop the passengers who were storming the cockpit.

 

Earlier in the day, Malaysian police visited the home of Capt. Zaharie Ahmad Shah, the 53-year-old pilot of the missing plane.

 

Shah is a married father of three grown children with more than 18,000 hours of experience in the air. He has been described as an affluent aviation buff, with a home in a gated community that police spent about two hours inside today. The first officer, Fariq Abdul Hamid, 27, joined Malaysia Airlines in 2007 and has 2,000 hours of flying time.

 

In recent days the Malaysian government has been criticized for not sharing information earlier with international investigators.

 

A senior Western law enforcement official told ABC News today that the Malaysian government repeatedly turned down assistance from Interpol to assist in its investigation. That offer has since been repeated several times and declined each time.

 

"It's the old pre-9/11 approach: close-hold information, don't share anything," the official said.

 

A spokeswoman for Interpol declined comment.

 

Law enforcement officials are now worried that critical investigative time has been lost and leads could well have dried up as sources of information could have dispersed in the last week. The FBI also hasn't been invited by the Malaysian government to help on the ground, sources said.

 

"Malaysia Airlines has shared all available information with the relevant authorities since the moment we learned that the aircraft had disappeared," read a statement from the airline. "This is truly an unprecedented situation, for Malaysia Airlines and for the entire aviation industry."

 

Follow All the Latest News on Missing Flight MH 370

 

At a Saturday news conference Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak said that the plane was steered off course by someone on board, was airborne for more than seven hours and may have traveled as far as Kazakhstan. He added that although the movements were consistent with deliberate acts, he wouldn't confirm that the plane was hijacked.

 

"We are still investigating all possibilities as to what caused MH370 to deviate from its original flight path," he said.

Comedy gold that you still belieBe in the United 93 hollywood propaganda story.

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If it crashed into the Indian Ocean there would be lots and lots of floating debris

The military radars lost it in the flight path from Malaysia to the Middle East

 

It could easily have landed in Iran and be getting fitted for a nuclear bomb right now

An airliner coming across the Atlantic wouldn't be fired upon by our military if they identified themselves as friendly, and they could blow that sucker anyplace they wanted on the Eastern seaboard

 

When was the last time there was a terrorist incident that wasn't perpetrated by Muslims?

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SEPANG, Malaysia — A signaling system was disabled on the missing Malaysia Airlines jet before a pilot spoke to air traffic control without mentioning trouble, a senior Malaysian official said on Sunday, reinforcing theories that one of the pilots may have been involved in diverting the plane and adding urgency to the investigation of their pasts and possible motivations.

With the increasing likelihood that Flight 370 was purposefully diverted and flown possibly thousands of miles from its planned route, Malaysian officials faced more questions about how the investigation, marked by days of contradictory government statements, might have ballooned into a global goose chase for information.

 

Prime Minister Najib Razak acknowledged on Saturday that military radar and satellite data raised the possibility that the plane could have ended up somewhere in Indonesia, the southern Indian Ocean, or along a vast arc of territory from northern Laos across western China to central Asia. Malaysian officials said they were scrambling to coordinate a 25-nation effort to find the plane.

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