Jump to content

Man-Made Global Warming to Cause Floods!!!


Recommended Posts

Hope for a slow thaw. Believe in supreme beings not throwing a heat wave over the snow packs. When ice breaks it becomes its own foundations for daming up streams. Look out, Natural balance is a female canine along with Lady Justice applying adapt or become extinct to every body that forgets two universal laws in plumbing.

 

Water seeks its own level and sh!t rolls down hill. Valleys and wetlands aren't pleasent places to be in spring thaws..but the crops sure grow good after the dryout.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about the disappearing shellfish? Do u prefer eating jelly fish?

http://www.dailymail...-predators.html

Even if climate change is debatable, which I don't believe, increased acidification is an observable consequence of our CO2 emissions.

Dave Peiser For Congress!

http://www.peiserforcongress.com/

http://<span style="...real-tax-reform

http://www.freewebs....description.htm

70365_100005799457554_14620414_q.jpg

2014: VOTE FOR WE THE PEOPLE IN THE "PEOPLE'S HOUSE!" USA!

prPMT2010-10-29.GIF

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had to get all my trucks steam cleaned to get the latest storms' slag and salt off. I should send the bill to that liar al gore.

ACA has a portion where you can get a brain scan if you fear you are stupid, I suggest you take them up on it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Woops!! I mean floods likely to happen because of the EXTREME COLD!!!!!!

It might seem like that to ignorant bamboozled retards like yourself but in the real world....

 

Heavy Flooding and Global Warming: Is There a Connection?

Union of Concerned Scientists

March 2010

 

Climate change increases the probability of some types of weather. Recent heavy rains and flooding in the Northeast, Midwest, and Great Plains are consistent with a warming planet, and such events are expected to become more common over time.

 

As average temperatures in regions across the country have gone up, more rain has fallen during the heaviest downpours. Very heavy precipitation events, defined as the heaviest one percent, now drop 67 percent more precipitation in the Northeast, 31 percent more in the Midwest and 15 percent more in the Great Plains, including the Dakotas, than they did 50 years ago.

 

This happens because warmer air holds more moisture. This fact is apparent when you see water vapor hanging in the air after turning off a hot shower. When warm air holding moisture meets cooler air, the moisture condenses into tiny droplets that float in the air. If the drops get bigger and become heavy enough, they fall as precipitation.

 

If the emissions that cause global warming continue unabated, scientists expect the amount of rainfall during the heaviest precipitation events across country to increase more than 40 percent by the end of the century. Even if we dramatically curbed emissions, these downpours will still increase, but by only a little more than 20 percent. Regardless of what action we take to cut emissions, municipalities that are vulnerable to heavy precipitation events should plan for more flooding. Any efforts to reduce emissions would make it easier for them to adapt.

 

Climate science contrarians often argue that it is impossible for global warming to cause both heavy precipitation and drought. They are either misinformed or purposefully confusing the issue. Drought is a measure of annual precipitation, not the intensity of precipitation events.

 

As a consequence of global warming, annual precipitation levels have increased in many parts of the country and decreased in others. Between 1958 and 2007, for example, the Southeast and Southwest experienced more drought even while overall precipitation across the country increased an average of five percent. These precipitation changes, along with temperature shifts, threaten agriculture and have contributed to the northerly movement of plant hardiness zones.

 

It is worth noting that last months blizzard in the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and Northeast also is consistent with global warming. That heavy precipitation event just happened to occur in winter rather than spring, bringing snow rather than rain. Global warming will likely make the winter season shorter and colder weather less common, but winter will not disappear altogether.

 

Global warming also is causing measurable season creep worldwide. Spring weather is arriving earlier and fall weather is arriving later than ever before. If temperatures were a bit colder in the Northeast or Midwest, those regions would have been contending with a massive snowfall instead of heavy rains.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Man-Made Global Warming to Cause Floods!!!

It will also cause rape according to ultraliberal modern math !

 

Global warming isn't just going to melt the Arctic and flood our cities—it's also going to make Americans more likely to kill each other. That's the conclusion of a controversial new study that uses historic crime and temperature data to show that hotter weather leads to more murders, more rapes, more robberies, more assaults, and more property crimes.

 

http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2014/02/climate-change-murder-rape

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Warmer weather than usual = global warming

Colder weather than usual = global warming

Usual weather = global warming

Less precip = global warming

More precip = global warming

Fast-arriving Spring = global warming

Slow-arriving Spring = global warming

 

Be afraid. Be VERY afraid!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It might seem like that to ignorant bamboozled retards like yourself but in the real world....

 

Heavy Flooding and Global Warming: Is There a Connection?

Union of Concerned Scientists

March 2010

 

Climate change increases the probability of some types of weather. Recent heavy rains and flooding in the Northeast, Midwest, and Great Plains are consistent with a warming planet, and such events are expected to become more common over time.

 

As average temperatures in regions across the country have gone up, more rain has fallen during the heaviest downpours. Very heavy precipitation events, defined as the heaviest one percent, now drop 67 percent more precipitation in the Northeast, 31 percent more in the Midwest and 15 percent more in the Great Plains, including the Dakotas, than they did 50 years ago.

 

This happens because warmer air holds more moisture. This fact is apparent when you see water vapor hanging in the air after turning off a hot shower. When warm air holding moisture meets cooler air, the moisture condenses into tiny droplets that float in the air. If the drops get bigger and become heavy enough, they fall as precipitation.

 

If the emissions that cause global warming continue unabated, scientists expect the amount of rainfall during the heaviest precipitation events across country to increase more than 40 percent by the end of the century. Even if we dramatically curbed emissions, these downpours will still increase, but by only a little more than 20 percent. Regardless of what action we take to cut emissions, municipalities that are vulnerable to heavy precipitation events should plan for more flooding. Any efforts to reduce emissions would make it easier for them to adapt.

 

Climate science contrarians often argue that it is impossible for global warming to cause both heavy precipitation and drought. They are either misinformed or purposefully confusing the issue. Drought is a measure of annual precipitation, not the intensity of precipitation events.

 

As a consequence of global warming, annual precipitation levels have increased in many parts of the country and decreased in others. Between 1958 and 2007, for example, the Southeast and Southwest experienced more drought even while overall precipitation across the country increased an average of five percent. These precipitation changes, along with temperature shifts, threaten agriculture and have contributed to the northerly movement of plant hardiness zones.

 

It is worth noting that last months blizzard in the Midwest, Mid-Atlantic, and Northeast also is consistent with global warming. That heavy precipitation event just happened to occur in winter rather than spring, bringing snow rather than rain. Global warming will likely make the winter season shorter and colder weather less common, but winter will not disappear altogether.

 

Global warming also is causing measurable season creep worldwide. Spring weather is arriving earlier and fall weather is arriving later than ever before. If temperatures were a bit colder in the Northeast or Midwest, those regions would have been contending with a massive snowfall instead of heavy rains.

 

Facts can make cons have seizure!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the same hypothetical measurements that gave humanity relative time space continuum gave us Global warming.a mere century later.

 

A century ago they made jokes about taxing water and air. It is reality now, especially with this carbon footprint credits crap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Warmer weather than usual = global warming

Colder weather than usual = global warming

Usual weather = global warming

Less precip = global warming

More precip = global warming

Fast-arriving Spring = global warming

Slow-arriving Spring = global warming

 

Be afraid. Be VERY afraid!

 

Sex with children = Republican

 

Denial of facts = Republican

 

Distortion of facts = Republican

 

Denial of facts = Republican

 

Chronic lying = Republican

 

Chicken hawk = Republican

 

Carbon-Final.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Sex with children =

 

Denial of facts = Republican

 

Distortion of facts = Republican

 

Denial of facts = Republican

 

Chronic lying = Republican

 

Chicken hawk = Republican

 

Carbon-Final.jpg

 

 

The above post = childish

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

Carbon-Final.jpg

What is this model composed by? what if. could be, should have. might become. last but least, Nobody knows. And all this is based upon time changes getting spaced apart now hypotheticals.

 

Deniers are 10 fold worse than liars, they cannot tolerate hearing about physical absolutes and will destroy any evidence of such ideas they exist in plain sight, in plain sight to assure nobody else dares.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

More....

 

Increased flood risk linked to global warming

Likelihood of extreme rainfall may have been doubled by rising greenhouse-gas levels.

Nature

Quirin Schiermeier

Published online 16 February 2011

Nature 470, 316 (2011)

doi:10.1038/470316a

 

Climate change may be hitting home. Rises in global average temperature are remote from most people's experience, but two studies in this week's Nature(1),(2) conclude that climate warming is already causing extreme weather events that affect the lives of millions. The research directly links rising greenhouse-gas levels with the growing intensity of rain and snow in the Northern Hemisphere, and the increased risk of flooding in the United Kingdom.

 

Insurers will take note, as will those developing policies for adapting to climate change. "This has immense importance not just as a further justification for emissions reduction, but also for adaptation planning," says Michael Oppenheimer, a climate-policy researcher at Princeton University in New Jersey, who was not involved in the studies.

 

There is no doubt that humans are altering the climate, but the implications for regional weather are less clear. No computer simulation can conclusively attribute a given snowstorm or flood to global warming. But with a combination of climate models, weather observations and a good dose of probability theory, scientists may be able to determine how climate warming changes the odds. An earlier study(3), for example, found that global warming has at least doubled the likelihood of extreme events such as the 2003 European heatwave.

 

More-localized weather extremes have been harder to attribute to climate change until now. "Climate models have improved a lot since ten years ago, when we basically couldn't say anything about rainfall," says Gabriele Hegerl, a climate researcher at the University of Edinburgh, UK. In the first of the latest studies(1), Hegerl and her colleagues compared data from weather stations in the Northern Hemisphere with precipitation simulations from eight climate models (see page 378). "We can now say with some confidence that the increased rainfall intensity in the latter half of the twentieth century cannot be explained by our estimates of internal climate variability," she says.

 

The second study(2) links climate change to a specific event: damaging floods in 2000 in England and Wales. By running thousands of high-resolution seasonal forecast simulations with or without the effect of greenhouse gases, Myles Allen of the University of Oxford, UK, and his colleagues found that anthropogenic climate change may have almost doubled the risk of the extremely wet weather that caused the floods (see page 382). The rise in extreme precipitation in some Northern Hemisphere areas has been recognized for more than a decade, but this is the first time that the anthropogenic contribution has been nailed down, says Oppenheimer. The findings mean that Northern Hemisphere countries need to prepare for more of these events in the future. "What has been considered a 1-in-100-years event in a stationary climate may actually occur twice as often in the future," says Allen.

 

But he cautions that climate change may not always raise the risk of weather-related damage. In Britain, for example, snow-melt floods may become less likely as the climate warms. And Allen's study leaves a 10% chance that global warming has not affected or has even decreased the country's flood risk.

 

Similar attribution studies are under way for flood and drought risk in Europe, meltwater availability in the western United States and drought in southern Africa, typical of the research needed to develop effective climate-adaptation policies. "Governments plan to spend some US$100 billion on climate adaptation by 2020, although presently no one has an idea of what is an impact of climate change and what is just bad weather," says Allen.

 

Establishing the links between climate change and weather could also shape climate treaties, he says. "If rich countries are to financially compensate the losers of climate change, as some poorer countries would expect, you'd like to have an objective scientific basis for it."

 

The insurance industry has long worried about increased losses resulting from more extreme weather (see 'Fatal floods'), but conclusively pinning the blame on climate change will take more research, says Robert Muir-Wood, chief research officer with RMS, a company headquartered in Newark, California, that constructs risk models for the insurance industry. "This is a key part of our research agenda and insurance companies do accept the premise" that there could be a link, he says. "If there's evidence that risk is changing, then this is something we need to incorporate in our models."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Warmer weather than usual = global warming

Warmer weather than usual over most of the planet year after year is a sign of global warming.

 

 

 

Colder weather than usual = global warming

Colder weather than usual may in some cases be a sign of climate changes.

 

 

 

Usual weather = global warming

Nobody thinks that "usual weather" means anything, idiot.

 

 

 

Less precip = global warming

Correct, droughts are a consequence of global warming.

 

 

 

More precip = global warming

Heavier precipitation, rainfall and snowfall, is increasing as a result of the fact that warmer air holds more water vapor and global warming has increased both air temperatures and water vapor levels (over 4%).

 

 

 

Fast-arriving Spring = global warming

Spring is arriving sooner as a result of the climate changes being reduced by global warming.

 

 

 

Slow-arriving Spring = global warming

Since there is no place on Earth where Spring is actually arriving later, I have to conclude (once again) that you are a complete retard.

 

 

 

Be afraid. Be VERY afraid!

Be stupid. Be VERY stupid! No one will notice any difference.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...