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Was the American revolution unjustified


pr29
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Lol that was in response to you saying that you'd be British if the USA and Britain were closer. I didn't quite follow the logic because if an ocean doesn't separate Canada and USA...


but do you think the American revolution was justified, and if so, why?

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Why? What justified the resort to violence?

 

As I said in my previous post ---- it was about taxes some people didn't want to pay:

 

 

The French and Indian War, or Seven Years War, represented the decisive turning point in British-colonial relations. The Treaty of Paris in 1763 ratified Britain’s undisputed control of the seas and shipping trade, as well as its sovereignty over much of the North American continent east of the Mississippi River (including French Canada).

 

But a steep price accompanied the fruits of total victory. The British Government had borrowed heavily from British and Dutch bankers to finance the war, and as a consequence the national debt almost doubled from £75 million in 1754 to £133 million in 1763. In order to address this onerous liability, British officials turned to larger import duties on enumerated goods like sugar and tobacco, along with a series of high excise (sales) taxes on goods such as salt, beer, and spirits. This taxation strategy tended to burden consumers disproportionately. In addition, government bureaucracy expanded in order to collect the needed revenue. As the number of royal officials more than doubled, Parliament delegated new legal and administrative authority to them. Thus, even as British subjects lauded their preeminent position in the world, they chafed under the weight of increased debts and tightened government controls.

 

Given Britain’s exertions on the North American continent for the sake of colonial security, both ministers and members of Parliament determined that the colonies were obligated to share the costs of empire. But the war exposed the weakness of British administrative control in the colonies on various fronts. The subsequent efforts on the part of royal officials to rectify these deficiencies and collect unprecedented amounts of revenue violated what many American colonists understood as the clear precedent of more than a century of colonial-imperial relations. New world institutions of self-government and trade, having matured in an age of salutary neglect, would resist and ultimately rebel against perceived British encroachment. Taxation policy became a central point of contention, because it tended to threaten both the prosperity and autonomy of colonial society. http://www.taxhistory.org/www/website.nsf/Web/THM1756?OpenDocument

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They wanted the colonists to pay some small extra taxes in order to reimburse The Crown for monies spent defending the colonists in the French and Indian War.

 

Wow. I have never seen a more blatant attempt to rewrite history in my life!

 

How about the way The Crown ignored every entreaty by the Colonists for honest representation? How about the British attacking, undermining, and persecuting Colonists who dared speak out against the Crown's ever more totalitarian actions? How about the British resorting to naked violence to quell dissent? Do the words "Boston Massacre" mean anything to you??

 

Of course, the final match on the powderkeg was when the British troops marched on Concord, MA seeking to confiscate arms and ammunition from the militia in the area; something you think would be a wonderful idea! No wonder you want to minimize and dismiss the realities that led to the Revolution!

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They wanted the colonists to pay some small extra taxes in order to reimburse The Crown for monies spent defending the colonists in the French and Indian War.

This is true. It was about taxes. Imagine that today: "They're raising taxes, revolution!"

I like the way it turned out. America is a very nice place to live.

I also like the way it turned out. Without it, Canada may not exist. (It was flooded with Loyalist refugees after the war, making it a loyalist stronghold ever since).

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Which aspect in particular?

Im not sure, its about one president bribed the barbary pirates to let our ships pass, another president said fu and took em out

 

oblamer is more of a pay the bribe type...like "please dont hurt us"

 

from way back in franklin daze..

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Why was the American revolution justified? When you don't like your government, that doesn't make violence acceptable, so...

Everyone kicks English ass, england is a very weak gay society much like liberals they are all c@ck suckers and weak,,, we took what we wanted. If we wanted canada we would take it.

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Everyone kicks English ass, england is a very weak gay society much like liberals they are all c@ck suckers and weak,,, we took what we wanted. If we wanted canada we would take it.

You tried to take Canada. 1812-1814. You failed, sir.

Because we Americans doN'T like the idea of a king.

 

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funny that they would then elect a King and give him more power than the British King had at the time...

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You tried to take Canada. 1812-1814. You failed, sir.

 

funny that they would then elect a King and give him more power than the British King had at the time...

no one tried to take canada

 

they were saying "you take it" no "you take it"

 

we werent war with the 3 canadians...

 

The War of 1812 was a 32-month military conflict between the United States of America and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, its North American colonies and its Indian allies. The outcome resolved many issues which remained from the American War of Independence, but involved no boundary changes. The United States declared war in 1812 for several reasons, including trade restrictions brought about by Britain's continuing war with France, the impressment of American merchant sailors into the Royal Navy, British support of American Indian tribes against American expansion, outrage over insults to national honour after humiliations on the high seas, and possible American interest in annexing British North American territory (part of modern-day Canada) which had been denied to them in the settlement ending the American Revolutionary War. [3]

 

The war was fought in three principal theatres. Firstly, at sea, warships and privateers of each side attacked the other's merchant ships, while the British blockaded the Atlantic coast of the United States and mounted large-scale raids in the later stages of the war. Secondly, both land and naval battles were fought on the American–Canadian frontier, which ran along the Great Lakes, the Saint Lawrence River and the northern end of Lake Champlain. Thirdly, the American South and Gulf Coast also saw major land battles in which the American forces defeated Britain's Indian allies and a British invasion force at New Orleans. Some invasions or counter strikes were unsuccessful, while others successfully attacked enemy objectives and took possession of opposition territory. At the end of the war both sides signed the Treaty of Ghent, and all parties returned occupied land to its pre war owner.

 

With the majority of its army and naval forces tied down in Europe fighting the Napoleonic Wars until 1814, the British at first used a defensive strategy, repelling multiple American invasions of the provinces of Upper and Lower Canada. The Americans gained control over Lake Erie in 1813, seized parts of western Ontario, and ended the prospect of an Indian confederacy and an independent Indian state in the Midwest under British sponsorship. In September 1814, a British force invaded and occupied eastern Maine. This territory, along with parts of Michigan and Wisconsin, were seized and held by the British and their Indian allies for the duration of the war. In the southwest, General Andrew Jackson destroyed the military strength of the Creek nation at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in 1814. With the defeat of Napoleon in 1814 on April 6, the British adopted a more aggressive strategy, sending in three large invasion armies. The British victory at the Battle of Bladensburg in August 1814 allowed them to capture and burn Washington, D.C, but they were repulsed in an attempt to take Baltimore. American victories in September 1814 repulsed the British invasion of New York, and the British suffered a major defeat at New Orleans in January 1815.

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funny that they would then elect a King and give him more power than the British King had at the time...

 

Not true. Certainly, George Washington might very well have been able to declare himself King and most of the new nation might very well have accepted that. Fortunately, Washington proved to be a true Statesman. He chose to comport himself responsibly and humbly, rejecting the trappings of power. When asked before his first swearing in as President whether he wanted to be called, "Your Majesty" or something else similarly garish, his response reflected his nature: "Mister President will do." He could have stayed in office the rest of his life also, but instead chose to serve two terms only and then step down. If only we had a statesman like him today!

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It turns out we are almost just like the British anyway. Only we dont have a Monarch, otherwise the USA and UK are constantly teaming up to fight wars. The Mohammad Mosaddegh incident comes to mind. I find it sort of strange that we are so tight with the British. Why for instance arent we tight with the Irish or Canadian government? Instead its always the British and American soldiers going off to fight together. Its kind of weird if you think about it.

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Why was the American revolution justified? When you don't like your government, that doesn't make violence acceptable, so...

 

When colonials want to be free to set up their own government, THAT "doesn't make violence acceptable, so..."

Why did England sent out the redcoats?

If you really don't know the reasons for the war, may I suggest reading the Declaration of Independence?

 

It lists exactly why we went to war for freedom.

The revisionists trying to rewrite history in this thread astound me,,,,

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