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What do you think of the Beretta USA 92 FS INOX?


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What do you gun nuts think of the Beretta 92 FS Compact, INOX?

 

I do not like guns, but after 50 years gone by since I did the Navy

M-1 and BAR and .45, K bar, and Carbine and Shotgun,

and getting out and hunting with a 30.06 with iron sights,

I reckon it is time to get a handgun and permit with all the

gangs and rich ahole druggies helping the criminal dealers and

bribing the po LICE and judges and politicians.

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Find a Firestar .45. ( Manufactured by STAR in Spain ) Small - really solid ( 1911 frame design ) heavy for a small .45 - quality manufacturing. Makes a hole like a nickel. Like being hit by a freight train. Takes down in seconds - no tools required. Has a reverse slide - unique , unusual design. I've fired at least 5.000 rounds through mine & not a single hang up. It is a SA - so one in the pipe is good - so you don't have to drag the slide back in a bad situation. 6 - 7 round magazine , but extended mags are available ( 10 round ).

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"I don't like guns"

 

Translates to: "I want a gun just because and I won't get training or think I need to have a fundamental ability to use said firearm if the need arises. The fact I want a gun that I don't like gives me a false impression of safety."

 

After all your ranting, I want to see a certificate of completion from a reputable training company that you have proven proficient in the use, maintenance and storage of firearms. After that, I want you to prove you are storing it in a manner consistent with your ideology, locked in a safe with a trigger lock installed and the key in another room with the ammo in still another room.

 

If you really want one, buy a Glock 17 and try not to shoot yourself.

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"I don't like guns"

 

 

If you really want one, buy a Glock 17 and try not to shoot yourself.

I ( just one of my quirks ) always liked an exposed hammer. Gotta be more tuned in to the draw ( hammers can get caught - hung up ). I just like to see that hammer down or cocked. Just me. I watched a Pawn Stars episode - it will be on again. Guy comes in with a fake book ( hollow ) used for smuggling. Rick - the shop owner says, let me see if my pistol fits inside. He reaches behind his back & pulls out his ( I'm sure ) 1911 .45. The feckin gun was cocked ( dumb shiit ). Watch when the episode is on again.

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Find a Firestar .45. ( Manufactured by STAR in Spain ) Small - really solid ( 1911 frame design ) heavy for a small .45 - quality manufacturing. Makes a hole like a nickel. Like being hit by a freight train. Takes down in seconds - no tools required. Has a reverse slide - unique , unusual design. I've fired at least 5.000 rounds through mine & not a single hang up. It is a SA - so one in the pipe is good - so you don't have to drag the slide back in a bad situation. 6 - 7 round magazine , but extended mags are available ( 10 round ).

Thanks. I am thinking of going to a couple of gun stores around here and will see

what they have available for testing.

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"I don't like guns"

Translates to: "I want a gun just because and I won't get training or think I need to have a fundamental ability to use said firearm if the need arises. The fact I want a gun that I don't like gives me a false impression of safety."

When you learn to read, you will read the rest of the OP. I got great training in the Navy in small arms, not only in boot camp but also on my ship's Landing Party. IE, before there were SEALS, Navy ships each had a squad of shooters.

 

Try hitting a target towed several hundred yards behind the ship when the ship and the target are both

moving. We practiced regularly with M-1 Garands, BARs, and .45s. And the Captain had a couple of

shotguns, so we shot skeet, too.

 

Oh I forgot, you azzholes who never served in the military are the dick head cheney types of shooters.

 

After all your ranting, I want to see a certificate of completion from a reputable training company that you have proven proficient in the use, maintenance and storage of firearms. After that, I want you to prove you are storing it in a manner consistent with your ideology, locked in a safe with a trigger lock installed and the key in another room with the ammo in still another room.

When I was a kid, no one needed to lock the doors to their homes. But because republicans have moved millions of jobs to communist china and brought in 20,000,000 illegals, there are no home breakins.

 

And rich azzholes are fueling the drug dealers and murderers selling heroin and crack. So, now, it has

become necessary to think about having a gun.

 

Personally, if it is just one or two punks like neo cons on LF, I would not worry and probably just beat

the snot out of them rather than pull a chicken [excrement] zimmerman stunt on them.

 

If you really want one, buy a Glock 17 and try not to shoot yourself.

Thanks. So much better advice than ahole gallows, above, showing us his favorite gun, the cheney.

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Colt pistols have long represented the gold standard in magazine-fed semi-automatic handguns.


Modern semi-automatic pistols all trace their roots to the famed Colt M1911 pistol, designed by John Browning and the standard-issue U.S. military sidearm from 1911 to 1985. Colt 1911 pistols and their descendants were in the hands of confident World War I, World War II, Korean War and Vietnam-era servicemen. Colt customers today can purchase reproductions of these weapons, each faithfully manufactured to the original specifications from factory blueprints.


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william was saying something about the const only allows muskets so,

 

I think a nice kentucky rifle, is all william can legally own

 

but you cant keep it loaded...

 

everything must be locked in a seperate container

 

this is what william will buy, unless he is a hypocrite...

 

S223b.jpg

 

 

you can see a nice closeup at http://www.cherrys.com/pedpics/S223b.jpg

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Colt pistols have long represented the gold standard in magazine-fed semi-automatic handguns.

Modern semi-automatic pistols all trace their roots to the famed Colt M1911 pistol, designed by John Browning and the standard-issue U.S. military sidearm from 1911 to 1985. Colt 1911 pistols and their descendants were in the hands of confident World War I, World War II, Korean War and Vietnam-era servicemen. Colt customers today can purchase reproductions of these weapons, each faithfully manufactured to the original specifications from factory blueprints.

The military .45 shot a big, fat slug to knock down someone coming at you, still a concern of a friend

of mine who says that a druggie all jacked up is hard to stop with a 9 mm or a .38

He has .45s

william was saying something about the const only allows muskets so,

 

I think a nice kentucky rifle, is all william can legally own

 

but you cant keep it loaded...

 

everything must be locked in a seperate container

 

this is what william will buy, unless he is a hypocrite...

 

S204b.jpg

 

For you jerkoffs who have never served in the military or the state police or a National Guard unit

like I have, the Constitution says that is all you are allowed to carry to shoot game for food.

And if you need more than one shot, you should probably let men do the hunting.

A military person has had discipline and was well regulated and can therefore be trusted

with a firearm unlike you dick head cheney and zimmerman hero wannabees.

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If you have to have a 9mm. The Browning Hi Power is a single-action, semi-automatic handgun available in 9mm and .40 S&W calibers. It is based on a design by American firearms inventor John Browning, and completed by Dieudonné Saive at Fabrique Nationale (FN) of Herstal, Belgium. Browning died in 1926, several years before the design was finalized. The Hi-Power is one of the most widely used military pistols in history,[3] having been used by the armed forces of over 50 countries.[1]


The Hi Power name is somewhat misleading and alluded to the 13-round magazine capacity; almost twice that of contemporary designs such as the Luger or Mauser 1910. The pistol is often referred to as an HP (for "Hi-Power" or "High-Power")[4] or as a GP (for the French term, "Grande Puissance"). The term P-35 is also used, based on the introduction of the pistol in 1935. It is most often called the "Hi Power", even in Belgium. It is also known as the BAP (Browning Automatic Pistol), particularly in Irish service. Although the Browning name will appear on pistols imported to the United States, the model name "Hi-Power" will not be seen on any genuine FN/Browning manufactured pistol, regardless of country of origin or location of sale--clones will, however, place the "Hi-Power" mark.


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If you have to have a 9mm. The Browning Hi Power is a single-action, semi-automatic handgun available in 9mm and .40 S&W calibers. It is based on a design by American firearms inventor John Browning, and completed by Dieudonné Saive at Fabrique Nationale (FN) of Herstal, Belgium. Browning died in 1926, several years before the design was finalized. The Hi-Power is one of the most widely used military pistols in history,[3] having been used by the armed forces of over 50 countries.[1]

The Hi Power name is somewhat misleading and alluded to the 13-round magazine capacity; almost twice that of contemporary designs such as the Luger or Mauser 1910. The pistol is often referred to as an HP (for "Hi-Power" or "High-Power")[4] or as a GP (for the French term, "Grande Puissance"). The term P-35 is also used, based on the introduction of the pistol in 1935. It is most often called the "Hi Power", even in Belgium. It is also known as the BAP (Browning Automatic Pistol), particularly in Irish service. Although the Browning name will appear on pistols imported to the United States, the model name "Hi-Power" will not be seen on any genuine FN/Browning manufactured pistol, regardless of country of origin or location of sale--clones will, however, place the "Hi-Power" mark.

 

nice looking gun. Looks a lot like a 1911.

 

A 9mm is not a light round. I have fired a Lugar from WWII, and it has quite a kick.

 

The reason I was liking the Beretta 92 is to not have the hammer or any parts catching

on the draw.

 

And the compact version is somewhere between a full sized 1911 and a short

barreled concealable weapon. My friend's short .45 makes me think he needs to have

the bad guy right in front of him.

 

The compact Beretta has a range of 150 yards. A longer barrel will give a more accurate

shot at 10 yards on out.

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William - All of your military training means jack to me. You can play up your "I was in the Navy. I'm the only one allowed to own anything above a muzzle-loader..." BS all you want. Fact is, your argument is invalid because you are a civilian. Not active Duty, therefore, all you can own is a muzzle loader. You said it, if you need more than once shot, you need to let the men do the shooting. All you should need is one shot, right?

 

BTW, a Glock is safe, reliable and easy to maintain. and 9mm is ubiquitous, so you should have no trouble finding rounds for it, whether FMJs or HP for self-defense. Good luck.

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William - All of your military training means jack to me. You can play up your "I was in the Navy. I'm the only one allowed to own anything above a muzzle-loader..." BS all you want. Fact is, your argument is invalid because you are a civilian. Not active Duty, therefore, all you can own is a muzzle loader. You said it, if you need more than once shot, you need to let the men do the shooting. All you should need is one shot, right?

Some of us do not forget our training just because we left the military moron. It sounds like you forgot all your high school education the moment you got out.

 

And now that you mention it, in my training with the Garand and the BAR, yes, one shot per target was the standard. All I see on the news now is a bunch of poorly trained US military guys in the mid east wars spraying automatic fire from M-16s, hitting walls, air, civilians - anything but a bad guy. Some of those guys need to go back for re-education on the firing ranges and only be allowed semi-automatic rifles or one bullet at a time, like you.

 

BTW, a Glock is safe, reliable and easy to maintain. and 9mm is ubiquitous, so you should have no trouble finding rounds for it, whether FMJs or HP for self-defense. Good luck.

Thanks. I will look at them. Saw a Glock on the internet that fires a .40 round, too.

I reckon I will need to go to a big gun store and pick up quite a few handguns to see

how they feel as to handle, weight, balance, protruding parts to hang up on a draw,

size of bullet, then fire a few and review their maintenance and reliability records while waiting for the CC permit.

 

Thanks to all contributors for their suggestions. That was my purpose, to get input. I

see you all have your favorites.

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FIL has a 1928 Beretta - 9mm short ( .380 ). Looks like a piece of jewelry.

I use a 9mm short (.380) for a secondary weapon, a Tarus TCP 738 "D" model.

My main "carry" is a Colt model 1911, almost a hundred years old and I shoot it every chance I get.

Have fired thousands of rounds through the old Colt .45 ACP, Ain't nothing like the feel of an original model 1911 in your hand. :)

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What do you gun nuts think of the Beretta 92 FS Compact, INOX?

 

I do not like guns, but after 50 years gone by since I did the Navy

M-1 and BAR and .45, K bar, and Carbine and Shotgun,

and getting out and hunting with a 30.06 with iron sights,

I reckon it is time to get a handgun and permit with all the

gangs and rich ahole druggies helping the criminal dealers and

bribing the po LICE and judges and politicians.

 

My advice to you is going to be honestly given, William. I'm going to take a different tack than the others as well.

 

There are a number of firearms that are roughly equal (IMHO) regarding quality, durability, accuracy, and reliability. I would say pick the one that fits your hand the best and points most naturally for you. Don't pick one because someone else says they like it. Your military training gives you some fundamentals, but since it has been so many years you need to remember that shooting and firearms handling is a perishable skill. Depending on how much practicing you want to do (or not do, as the case may be) that will affect what your choice is going to be.

 

If you're just looking for a gun that is simple and easy to use and you won't have to worry about really training yourself in a manual of arms, then look at a revolver. A .357 Magnum can be used with .38 Specials for urban defense, and the .38s will give you very mild and controllable recoil while still being hard-hitting enough with the right loads to be effective. You also don't have to worry as much about maintenance and you don't have to worry about a magazine spring taking a set if loaded for too long. I like the Smith & Wessons and the Rugers the best; the Rugers are more heavily built while the S&Ws tend to be a little smoother and more accurate, but that difference in accuracy would require a very seriously skilled shooter to tell the difference.

 

If you really do want an auto, such as the Beretta you ask about, then again: find one that fits your hand. The Berettas are fine weapons, though I find the new PX4 Storm series to be more comfortable in the hand and I shoot them better than the 92FS/M9 pistols. I don't tend to like the DA/SA transition (from long heavy first shot to short, light follow-up shots) but that's very much personal preference. There are spring kits that can improve the factory trigger and give you better and more consistently accurate shooting.

 

I do most of my shooting with Glocks. I find them to be the most reliable out-of-the-box pistols available today. If you don't like the way they fit your hand, the S&W M&P series has proven itself to be an excellent tool as well. Some people like the HK, and a lot of people think highly of the Springfield Armory XD, but neither of them fits my hand well and I find the HKs overpriced. Yes, they're every bit as good as a Glock... but you can buy two Glocks for the price of one HK.

 

I used to use .40 as my primary carry round (the LE agency I was in issued .40s) but with modern ammo I actually prefer the 9mm. Milder recoil but just as much ballistic impact. I still have a fondness for the 1911 .45, but I just shoot the Glock 9mm more effectively. Buy at least twice as many mags as you intend to keep loaded, and rotate them out every 30 days. This will prevent spring fatigue compromising your pistol's reliability.

 

Hope that helps.

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I watched a Pawn Stars episode - it will be on again. Guy comes in with a fake book ( hollow ) used for smuggling. Rick - the shop owner says, let me see if my pistol fits inside. He reaches behind his back & pulls out his ( I'm sure ) 1911 .45. The feckin gun was cocked ( dumb shiit ). Watch when the episode is on again.

 

Actually, if the pistol truly is a 1911 (I don't watch the show and haven't seen that episode) and Rick is carrying the weapon for defense, then carrying it cocked with the safety engaged is the ONLY safe way to carry it.

 

The 1911 is a single-action pistol (meaning the trigger performs the "single action" of releasing the cocked hammer), and you can't even engage the safety unless the hammer is cocked. Some people will carry it chamber empty, but then you need two hands to get the gun running. Loading the chamber and then trying to put the hammer down over a live round is a sure way to have an accidental discharge, and with the Series 70 pattern 1911s dropping the gun with the hammer down on a live round guarantees it going off when it hits the ground.

 

Carrying the weapon for defense, it is best to chamber the round and then engage the safety. Yes, the hammer is cocked, but you have the thumb safety AND the grip safety preventing the weapon from firing, and all you have to do as you're clearing the holster is thumb the safety down and the weapon is ready to go.

 

My $.02 worth.

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