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Huffington Out to Educate Liberals on Finance


Golfboy
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I hope she succeeds, but I wonder if she realizes that when her readers become economically and financially literate, that they will realize the leftwing talking points don't hold water?

Imagine a world where liberals learn that budgets are important, and that debt is bad?

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/arianna-huffington/huffpost-financial-education_b_4284273.html

 

I'm delighted to announce Financial Education, a new HuffPost section in partnership with Bank of America's Better Money Habits initiative. Financial Education will be a hub of stories, advice and tools to help you make informed money management decisions, from planning a budget and reducing debt to improving your credit score and refinancing a mortgage.

Financial Education is rooted in the belief that by empowering ourselves to take control of our own financial lives, we can reduce the stress that so often accompanies financial decisions and at the same time improve the parts of our lives that are about so much more than money: our health, our families, our careers, our homes. It's a useful paradox: by learning more about how money affects our lives, we can make sure it doesn't take over our lives, and by learning how to look after our financial capital, we can also take better care of our human capital.

We're delighted to be partnering with Better Money Habits, which was launched to acknowledge that the financial crisis and recession didn't just affect the American economy as a whole; it deeply affected the lives of individuals and families as well. After conducting a study in partnership with Harris Interactive -- revealing that 32 percent of Americans believe a lack of financial knowledge led them to make bad financial decisions -- Bank of America joined forces with the Khan Academy, one of the great entrepreneurial success stories of recent years. Since April, the Khan Academy and Bank of America have been collaborating on Better MoneyHabits, offering videos that simplify complex financial topics, with the goal of helping people make better money decisions. HuffPost's Financial Education section will feature these videos -- which bring to life key financial issues like credit, loans, interest and taxes -- alongside contributions from HuffPost reporters and our community of bloggers. By doing this, we hope to bring to life one of the bits of good news turned up by Bank of America's study: 71 percent of respondents believe the Internet makes it easier to learn about personal finance.

Here are some statistics that illustrate just how much of a need there is for more financial literacy and education in America:

  • According to the Federal Reserve, Americans collectively owe $846.9 billion in credit card debt, more than $1 trillion in student loans, and $7.75 trillion in mortgages.

  • Sixty-one percent of Americans who participated in FINRA's National Financial Capability Study in 2012 did not compare credit cards, resulting in higher interest rates and fees.

  • Fifty-six percent of those respondents said they didn't have a rainy day fund.

  • Asked to grade their knowledge of personal finance, 40 percent of American adults who participated in the NFCC's 2013 Financial Literacy Survey gave themselves a grade of C, D or F.

  • Sixty-eight percent of polled parents say they would need to make tradeoffs in their own lives to afford back-to-school purchases for their children, according to an American Express Spending & Saving Tracker report.

Have at it libs! I look forward to actually being able to discuss finance and economics with people who can think, instead of regurgitating mindless leftwing bumper sticker slogans, as we see so often here whenever budgeting and finance issues come up.

 

 

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Have at it libs! I look forward to actually being able to discuss finance and economics with people who can think, instead of regurgitating mindless leftwing bumper sticker slogans, as we see so often here whenever budgeting and finance issues come up.

 

Gosh, where did the liberals go? :huh:

 

2 1/2 hours and not one single response.

 

They're working overtime to remain reality-free.

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"Huffington Out to Educate Liberals on Finance"

 

WOW, community outreach! When ever this topic is broached with a liberal you either get a blank stare or they start screaming "its Bush's fault!" with alarming predictability. It seems they are incapable of understanding any form of economics other then taxing people they don't like and spending the money on things they do.

 

..............but what happens when the liberals suddenly learn the demorats are bankrupting the country and Obama wants THEM to pay to help cover the interest on the debt and that their cherished social programs will have to be cut to help pay for all the reckless spending they did during the first 7 years of his Presidency? They will be screaming bloody murder while blaming Bush and the Repubs.

 

LISTEN-UP DEMS THIS IS GOING TO HAPPEN AND YOUR DREAMS FOR UTOPIA ARE GOING TO CRUMBEL RIGHT BEFORE YOUR EYES SO GET READY FOR A MAJOR LIFESTYLE DOWNGRADE YOU DESERVE IT!

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I hope she succeeds, but I wonder if she realizes that when her readers become economically and financially literate, that they will realize the leftwing talking points don't hold water?

Imagine a world where liberals learn that budgets are important, and that debt is bad?

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/arianna-huffington/huffpost-financial-education_b_4284273.html

 

I'm delighted to announce Financial Education, a new HuffPost section in partnership with Bank of America's Better Money Habits initiative. Financial Education will be a hub of stories, advice and tools to help you make informed money management decisions, from planning a budget and reducing debt to improving your credit score and refinancing a mortgage.

Financial Education is rooted in the belief that by empowering ourselves to take control of our own financial lives, we can reduce the stress that so often accompanies financial decisions and at the same time improve the parts of our lives that are about so much more than money: our health, our families, our careers, our homes. It's a useful paradox: by learning more about how money affects our lives, we can make sure it doesn't take over our lives, and by learning how to look after our financial capital, we can also take better care of our human capital.

We're delighted to be partnering with Better Money Habits, which was launched to acknowledge that the financial crisis and recession didn't just affect the American economy as a whole; it deeply affected the lives of individuals and families as well. After conducting a study in partnership with Harris Interactive -- revealing that 32 percent of Americans believe a lack of financial knowledge led them to make bad financial decisions -- Bank of America joined forces with the Khan Academy, one of the great entrepreneurial success stories of recent years. Since April, the Khan Academy and Bank of America have been collaborating on Better MoneyHabits, offering videos that simplify complex financial topics, with the goal of helping people make better money decisions. HuffPost's Financial Education section will feature these videos -- which bring to life key financial issues like credit, loans, interest and taxes -- alongside contributions from HuffPost reporters and our community of bloggers. By doing this, we hope to bring to life one of the bits of good news turned up by Bank of America's study: 71 percent of respondents believe the Internet makes it easier to learn about personal finance.

Here are some statistics that illustrate just how much of a need there is for more financial literacy and education in America:

  • According to the Federal Reserve, Americans collectively owe $846.9 billion in credit card debt, more than $1 trillion in student loans, and $7.75 trillion in mortgages.

  • Sixty-one percent of Americans who participated in FINRA's National Financial Capability Study in 2012 did not compare credit cards, resulting in higher interest rates and fees.

  • Fifty-six percent of those respondents said they didn't have a rainy day fund.

  • Asked to grade their knowledge of personal finance, 40 percent of American adults who participated in the NFCC's 2013 Financial Literacy Survey gave themselves a grade of C, D or F.

  • Sixty-eight percent of polled parents say they would need to make tradeoffs in their own lives to afford back-to-school purchases for their children, according to an American Express Spending & Saving Tracker report.

Have at it libs! I look forward to actually being able to discuss finance and economics with people who can think, instead of regurgitating mindless leftwing bumper sticker slogans, as we see so often here whenever budgeting and finance issues come up.

 

 

 

You know what's the only thing more hilarious than your OP? The fact that Huffington is partnering with an "evil bank" that suddenly wants to make sure it's readers are "informed consumers". I guess those greedy Wall Street fat cats actually have our best interests at heart.

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