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What's con's problem with Common Core?


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Parents across the country are up in arms about new standards for achievement. Cons are pissed and ignorantly think this is a state issue. What do you think?

 

The Standards

 

Building on the excellent foundation of standards states have laid, the Common Core State Standards are the first step in providing our young people with a high-quality education. It should be clear to every student, parent, and teacher what the standards of success are in every school.

 

Teachers, parents and community leaders have all weighed in to help create the Common Core State Standards. The standards clearly communicate what is expected of students at each grade level. This will allow our teachers to be better equipped to know exactly what they need to help students learn and establish individualized benchmarks for them. The Common Core State Standards focus on core conceptual understandings and procedures starting in the early grades, thus enabling teachers to take the time needed to teach core concepts and procedures well—and to give students the opportunity to master them.

 

With students, parents and teachers all on the same page and working together for shared goals, we can ensure that students make progress each year and graduate from school prepared to succeed in college and in a modern workforce.

 

To appropriately cite the Common Core State Standards, use the following:

 

Authors: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers

Title: Common Core State Standards (insert specific content area if you are using only one)

Publisher: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington D.C.

http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards



Introduction to the Common Core State Standards
June 2, 2010
The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the National Governors
Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) are pleased to present the final
Kindergarten-12 Common Core State Standards documents that our organizations have
produced on behalf of 48 states, two territories, and the District of Columbia.
These English
language arts and mathematics standards represent a set of expectations for student knowledge
and skills that high school graduates need to master to succeed in college and careers.
To develop these standards, CCSSO and the NGA Center worked with representatives
from participating states, a wide range of educators, content experts, researchers, national
organizations, and community groups. These final standards reflect the invaluable feedback
from the general public, teachers, parents, business leaders, states, and content area experts
and are informed by the standards of other high performing nations.
You will notice that the college- and career-readiness standards have been incorporated into
the K-12 standards, as was promised in the March 10, 2010 draft.
The criteria that we used to
develop the college- and career-readiness standards, as well as these K-12 standards are:
Aligned with college and work expectations;
Include rigorous content
and
application of knowledge through high-order skills;
Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards;
Informed by top-performing countries, so that all students are prepared to succeed in
our global economy and society; and,
Evidence and/or research-based.
The following links provide more information about the
criteria and considerations for standards development. The standards development process has incorporated the best
practices and research from across the nation and the world. While we have used all available
research to shape these documents, we recognize that there is more to be learned about the
most essential knowledge for student success. As new research is conducted and we evaluate
the implementation of the common core standards, we plan to revise the standards on a set review cycle.
Our organizations would like to thank our advisory group, which provides advice and guidance
on this initiative. Additional thanks are also given to the writers of the standards, who devoted
countless weekends and late nights to ensuring that the standards meet the high expectations for
rigor and clarity.
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Common Core represents the jackboot of tyranny on the neck of education.

 

If the brain trust in Tejas believes that Jesus rode dinosaurs and spoke cracker English, every student in Tejas schools should be taught the same nonsense.

 

That way, they'll be sure to compete with educated people - on a level playing field.

 

cc

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Brought to you by the same people that created No Child Left Behind.

Liberals hated NCLB because... well Bush created it.

So now they've redefined it themselves, so now it's the holy grail of education.

 

:rolleyes:

It was brought to you by the National Governor's association. Each state governor volunteered for it. You think it's the wrong thing to do?

 

Why do you think moms are so pissed about it? They are even keeping their kids out of school because of it.

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It was brought to you by the US Governor's association. Each state governor volunteered for it. You think it's the wrong thing to do?

I don't know anything about the program, so I can't speak to it.

I just think it's funny that liberals hated the idea of NCLB, but embrace this.

In order to ensure the "standards" are being met, they have to have uniformed testing.

Both of them seem to have taken the decision making out of what/how children should be educated from local hands, and given it to the Feds.

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Brought to you by the same people that created No Child Left Behind.

Liberals hated NCLB because... well Bush created it.

So now they've redefined it themselves, so now it's the holy grail of education.

 

:rolleyes:

face it, golfboy. we just hated Bush. I don't think it took us long to jump on board. Just like Med Part D. We jumped on board when it became law. We joined the adults in the room, quite unlike Republicans today.

 

I don't know anything about the program, so I can't speak to it.

I just think it's funny that liberals hated the idea of NCLB, but embrace this.

In order to ensure the "standards" are being met, they have to have uniformed testing.

Both of them seem to have taken the decision making out of what/how children should be educated from local hands, and given it to the Feds.

Well, Common Core isn't dictated by the Feds. It's run by the National Governor's Association. Each state governor volunteered for the program but moms didn't get the memo, I guess.

 

My only problem with testing on the NCLB is the problem many teachers have. How do you fire a PE Coach for his kids not passing English? How do you test the teachers? Currently, the tests don't make sense.

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'White moms' remark fuels Common Core clash

By STEPHANIE SIMON | 11/18/13 8:07 AM EST Updated: 11/18/13 6:17 PM EST

Education Secretary Arne Duncan realized fairly quickly that he had stumbled.

 

He had just told a gathering of state superintendents of education that “white suburban moms” were rebelling against the Common Core academic standards — new guidelines for math and language arts instruction — because their kids had done poorly on the tough new tests.


“All of a sudden, their child isn’t as brilliant as they thought they were and their school isn’t quite as good as they thought … and that’s pretty scary,” Duncan said at the event Friday.

Two hours later, with those comments sparking outrage on social media, Duncan told POLITICO that he “didn’t say it perfectly.”

And he formally apologized on an Education Department blog Monday.

 

(Sign up for POLITICO’s Morning Education tip sheet)

 

But he stood by his thesis: To oppose the Common Core is to oppose progress.

“Do we want more for our kids, or do we want less?” Duncan said. “Do we want higher standards or not?”

That’s the debate that Duncan dearly wants to have.

It’s not, however, the debate he’s getting.

 

To the immense frustration of Common Core supporters, an eclectic array of critics have raised sustained and impassioned objections about the new standards. From New York to Florida to Michigan to Louisiana, their voices are so loud and their critiques so varied that they have muddied the narrative around Common Core. It’s no longer a focused national debate about high standards; it’s hundreds of local debates, about everything from student privacy rights to cursive handwriting to computerized testing to the value of Shakespeare.

 

Over the summer, Duncan complained that opponents were “fringe groups” who make “outlandish claims” about “really wacky stuff” such as “mind control, robots, and biometric brain mapping.” There is undoubtedly some of that.

 

But there are also substantive critiques from all corners. Catholic scholars say the standards aren’t rigorous enough. Early childhood experts say they demand too much. Liberals complain the Common Core opens the door to excessive testing. Conservatives complain it opens the door to federal influence in local schools. Teachers don’t like the new textbooks. Parents don’t like the new homework.

 

And some critics sense a conspiracy, suggesting that the difficult Common Core tests are designed to make public schools look so bad that parents everywhere — including white, suburban moms — will rush to embrace charter schools, cyber schools, vouchers and other models that turn public education over to private entrepreneurs.

 

All but four states have adopted the Common Core State Standards, which aim to guide instruction in math and language arts from kindergarten through 12th grade. The standards have been endorsed by a broad coalition of politicians and business and education leaders. Supporters include the national teachers unions and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, President Barack Obama and former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush.


Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/11/arne-duncan-common-core-comment-99987.html#ixzz2l72qHGbK

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face it, golfboy. we just hated Bush. I don't think it took us long to jump on board. Just like Med Part D. We jumped on board when it became law. We joined the adults in the room, quite unlike Republicans today.

NCLB was written by Fat Teddy Kennedy, who later stabbed Bush in the back.

Another failed attempt by Bush to reach across the aisle and work with Democrats.

Well, Common Core isn't dictated by the Feds. It's run by the National Governor's Association. Each state governor volunteered for the program but moms didn't get the memo, I guess.

 

My only problem with testing on the NCLB is the problem many teachers have. How do you fire a PE Coach for his kids not passing English? How do you test the teachers? Currently, the tests don't make sense.

Okay so the States as group set the standards, instead of the Feds. Regardless who holds the hammer, local educators have no say, and still have to meet standardized testing, which was the main screaming point for Libs against NCLB.

Teachers are still going to be teaching to pass the tests because that's how they will be judged.

 

 

 

'White moms' remark fuels Common Core clash

I saw that yesterday... an amazingly ignorant statement by Duncan.

 

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NCLB was written by Fat Teddy Kennedy, who later stabbed Bush in the back.

Another failed attempt by Bush to reach across the aisle and work with Democrats.

Okay so the States as group set the standards, instead of the Feds. Regardless who holds the hammer, local educators have no say, and still have to meet standardized testing, which was the main screaming point for Libs against NCLB.

Teachers are still going to be teaching to pass the tests because that's how they will be judged.

 

 

 

I saw that yesterday... an amazingly ignorant statement by Duncan.

Yea, you're right. It's not always politically correct to speak the truth. I'm sure most of his comment is true. Americans have this false belief that we have the best education system and the smartest kids. Well that's a double foul on the truth meeter.

 

And, for a change, I have to stick up for Bush. He had many successes working across the aisle. He got votes from Dems on Iraq, Med Part D, and I'll bet NCLB. I don't think it had anything to do with Bush, however, we just aren't kamikazees!

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In education, of course, what it’s assumed that everybody should be required to know is called “the core.” Responsibility for teaching the core is divvied up between teachers of math, science, language arts, and social studies.

Variously motivated corporate interests, arguing that the core was being sloppily taught, organized a behind-the-scenes campaign to super-standardize it. They named their handiwork the Common Core State Standards to hide the fact that it was driven by policymakers in Washington D.C., who have thus far shoved it into every state except Alaska, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas, and Virginia.

This was done with insufficient public dialogue or feedback from experienced educators, no research, no pilot or experimental programs — no evidence at all that a floor-length list created by unnamed people attempting to standardize what’s taught is a good idea.

It’s a bad idea. Ignore the fact that specific Common Core State Standards will open up enough cans of worms to keep subject-matter specialists arguing among themselves forever. Consider instead the merit of Standards from a general perspective:

One: Standards shouldn’t be attached to school subjects, but to the qualities of mind it’s hoped the study of school subjects promotes. Subjects are mere tools, just as scalpels, acetylene torches, and transits are tools. Surgeons, welders, surveyors — and teachers — should be held accountable for the quality of what they produce, not how they produce it.

Two: The world changes. The future is indiscernible. Clinging to a static strategy in a dynamic world may be comfortable, even comforting, but it’s a Titanic-deck-chair exercise.

Three: The Common Core Standards assume that what kids need to know is covered by one or another of the traditional core subjects. In fact, the unexplored intellectual terrain lying between and beyond those familiar fields of study is vast, expands by the hour, and will go in directions no one can predict.

Four: So much orchestrated attention is being showered on the Common Core Standards, the main reason for poor student performance is being ignored—a level of childhood poverty the consequences of which no amount of schooling can effectively counter.

Five: The Common Core kills innovation. When it’s the only game in town, it’s the only game in town.

Six: The Common Core Standards are a set-up for national standardized tests, tests that can’t evaluate complex thought, can’t avoid cultural bias, can’t measure non-verbal learning, can’t predict anything of consequence (and waste boatloads of money).

Seven: The word “standards” gets an approving nod from the public (and from most educators) because it means “performance that meets a standard.” However, the word also means “like everybody else,” and standardizing minds is what the Standards try to do. Common Core Standards fans sell the first meaning; the Standards deliver the second meaning. Standardized minds are about as far out of sync with deep-seated American values as it’s possible to get.

Eight: The Common Core Standards’ stated aim — “success in college and careers”— is at best pedestrian, at worst an affront. The young should be exploring the potentials of humanness.

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In education, of course, what it’s assumed that everybody should be required to know is called “the core.” Responsibility for teaching the core is divvied up between teachers of math, science, language arts, and social studies.

Variously motivated corporate interests, arguing that the core was being sloppily taught, organized a behind-the-scenes campaign to super-standardize it. They named their handiwork the Common Core State Standards to hide the fact that it was driven by policymakers in Washington D.C., who have thus far shoved it into every state except Alaska, Minnesota, Nebraska, Texas, and Virginia.

This was done with insufficient public dialogue or feedback from experienced educators, no research, no pilot or experimental programs — no evidence at all that a floor-length list created by unnamed people attempting to standardize what’s taught is a good idea.

It’s a bad idea. Ignore the fact that specific Common Core State Standards will open up enough cans of worms to keep subject-matter specialists arguing among themselves forever. Consider instead the merit of Standards from a general perspective:

One: Standards shouldn’t be attached to school subjects, but to the qualities of mind it’s hoped the study of school subjects promotes. Subjects are mere tools, just as scalpels, acetylene torches, and transits are tools. Surgeons, welders, surveyors — and teachers — should be held accountable for the quality of what they produce, not how they produce it.

Two: The world changes. The future is indiscernible. Clinging to a static strategy in a dynamic world may be comfortable, even comforting, but it’s a Titanic-deck-chair exercise.

Three: The Common Core Standards assume that what kids need to know is covered by one or another of the traditional core subjects. In fact, the unexplored intellectual terrain lying between and beyond those familiar fields of study is vast, expands by the hour, and will go in directions no one can predict.

Four: So much orchestrated attention is being showered on the Common Core Standards, the main reason for poor student performance is being ignored—a level of childhood poverty the consequences of which no amount of schooling can effectively counter.

Five: The Common Core kills innovation. When it’s the only game in town, it’s the only game in town.

Six: The Common Core Standards are a set-up for national standardized tests, tests that can’t evaluate complex thought, can’t avoid cultural bias, can’t measure non-verbal learning, can’t predict anything of consequence (and waste boatloads of money).

Seven: The word “standards” gets an approving nod from the public (and from most educators) because it means “performance that meets a standard.” However, the word also means “like everybody else,” and standardizing minds is what the Standards try to do. Common Core Standards fans sell the first meaning; the Standards deliver the second meaning. Standardized minds are about as far out of sync with deep-seated American values as it’s possible to get.

Eight: The Common Core Standards’ stated aim — “success in college and careers”— is at best pedestrian, at worst an affront. The young should be exploring the potentials of humanness.

Are you arguing with the premise that there should be some kind of minimum allowable level of education promoted country wide? Shouldn't there be a limit to stupid? I also don't see anything in common core that forbids innovation or periodic update. What in Common Core makes you believe the program is 'static'?

 

"Standardized minds are about as far out of sync with deep-seated American values as it’s possible to get."-Statements like these just drive me batty!!! It's a license to be stupid! We're no longer an agrarian society. We no longer have very much in the way of regional needs and expectations. We are part of a global society and need to compete on a global playing field.

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face it, golfboy. we just hated Bush. I don't think it took us long to jump on board. Just like Med Part D. We jumped on board when it became law. We joined the adults in the room, quite unlike Republicans today.

 

Budget problems aside, Med Part D 1) worked and 2) came in under budget and 3) matched Dems Big Government philosophy.

 

Obamacare is a collapsing disaster that has done terrible damage to the economy and will do even worse damage to the best health care on Earth.

 

"Adults in the room" would demand that it be repealed.

 

We are part of a global society and need to compete on a global playing field.

 

Then obviously we ought to stand by the Founding Principles of small government that made us the richest country on the planet.

 

Duuuh.

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I don't know anything about the program, so I can't speak to it.

I just think it's funny that liberals hated the idea of NCLB, but embrace this.

In order to ensure the "standards" are being met, they have to have uniformed testing.

Both of them seem to have taken the decision making out of what/how children should be educated from local hands, and given it to the Feds.

this. i've never even heard of it. as long as it doesn't f**k with indiana's voucher program....i could rightfully give a f**k less.

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Parents across the country are up in arms about new standards for achievement. Cons are pissed and ignorantly think this is a state issue. What do you think?

 

The Standards

 

Building on the excellent foundation of standards states have laid, the Common Core State Standards are the first step in providing our young people with a high-quality education. It should be clear to every student, parent, and teacher what the standards of success are in every school.

 

Teachers, parents and community leaders have all weighed in to help create the Common Core State Standards. The standards clearly communicate what is expected of students at each grade level. This will allow our teachers to be better equipped to know exactly what they need to help students learn and establish individualized benchmarks for them. The Common Core State Standards focus on core conceptual understandings and procedures starting in the early grades, thus enabling teachers to take the time needed to teach core concepts and procedures well—and to give students the opportunity to master them.

 

With students, parents and teachers all on the same page and working together for shared goals, we can ensure that students make progress each year and graduate from school prepared to succeed in college and in a modern workforce.

 

To appropriately cite the Common Core State Standards, use the following:

 

Authors: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers

Title: Common Core State Standards (insert specific content area if you are using only one)

Publisher: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington D.C.

http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards

 

Introduction to the Common Core State Standards
June 2, 2010
The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the National Governors
Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) are pleased to present the final
Kindergarten-12 Common Core State Standards documents that our organizations have
produced on behalf of 48 states, two territories, and the District of Columbia.
These English
language arts and mathematics standards represent a set of expectations for student knowledge
and skills that high school graduates need to master to succeed in college and careers.
To develop these standards, CCSSO and the NGA Center worked with representatives
from participating states, a wide range of educators, content experts, researchers, national
organizations, and community groups. These final standards reflect the invaluable feedback
from the general public, teachers, parents, business leaders, states, and content area experts
and are informed by the standards of other high performing nations.
You will notice that the college- and career-readiness standards have been incorporated into
the K-12 standards, as was promised in the March 10, 2010 draft.
The criteria that we used to
develop the college- and career-readiness standards, as well as these K-12 standards are:
Aligned with college and work expectations;
Include rigorous content
and
application of knowledge through high-order skills;
Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards;
Informed by top-performing countries, so that all students are prepared to succeed in
our global economy and society; and,
Evidence and/or research-based.
The following links provide more information about the
criteria and considerations for standards development. The standards development process has incorporated the best
practices and research from across the nation and the world. While we have used all available
research to shape these documents, we recognize that there is more to be learned about the
most essential knowledge for student success. As new research is conducted and we evaluate
the implementation of the common core standards, we plan to revise the standards on a set review cycle.
Our organizations would like to thank our advisory group, which provides advice and guidance
on this initiative. Additional thanks are also given to the writers of the standards, who devoted
countless weekends and late nights to ensuring that the standards meet the high expectations for
rigor and clarity.

 

 

 

You liber's are so easily duped!

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It was brought to you by the National Governor's association. Each state governor volunteered for it. You think it's the wrong thing to do?

 

Why do you think moms are so pissed about it? They are even keeping their kids out of school because of it.

it does not go far enough. in order to graduate,every student must pass a calculus test, and write a thesis

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Allow me to answer this one, the title I mean.

 

What is the common core? Beliefs followed without questioning leaderships, or understanding self containment to the eternity that is and always has been and will become now?

 

divide and conquer ancestry one ancestor at a time has had its time to rule currently for over 400 generation leading lifetimes to honor "I don't know" what real is as wisdom of the ages that makes leaders qualified to lead reality.

 

What is reality compared to this real moment?

 

Stages of interpretation made real by laws that protect character role playing rights to ignore the self evident.

 

That Common Core Achievements of societal evolution???????????????

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Parents across the country are up in arms about new standards for achievement. Cons are pissed and ignorantly think this is a state issue. What do you think?

 

The Standards

 

Building on the excellent foundation of standards states have laid, the Common Core State Standards are the first step in providing our young people with a high-quality education. It should be clear to every student, parent, and teacher what the standards of success are in every school.

 

Teachers, parents and community leaders have all weighed in to help create the Common Core State Standards. The standards clearly communicate what is expected of students at each grade level. This will allow our teachers to be better equipped to know exactly what they need to help students learn and establish individualized benchmarks for them. The Common Core State Standards focus on core conceptual understandings and procedures starting in the early grades, thus enabling teachers to take the time needed to teach core concepts and procedures well—and to give students the opportunity to master them.

 

With students, parents and teachers all on the same page and working together for shared goals, we can ensure that students make progress each year and graduate from school prepared to succeed in college and in a modern workforce.

 

To appropriately cite the Common Core State Standards, use the following:

 

Authors: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers

Title: Common Core State Standards (insert specific content area if you are using only one)

Publisher: National Governors Association Center for Best Practices, Council of Chief State School Officers, Washington D.C.

http://www.corestandards.org/the-standards

 

Introduction to the Common Core State Standards
June 2, 2010
The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the National Governors
Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) are pleased to present the final
Kindergarten-12 Common Core State Standards documents that our organizations have
produced on behalf of 48 states, two territories, and the District of Columbia.
These English
language arts and mathematics standards represent a set of expectations for student knowledge
and skills that high school graduates need to master to succeed in college and careers.
To develop these standards, CCSSO and the NGA Center worked with representatives
from participating states, a wide range of educators, content experts, researchers, national
organizations, and community groups. These final standards reflect the invaluable feedback
from the general public, teachers, parents, business leaders, states, and content area experts
and are informed by the standards of other high performing nations.
You will notice that the college- and career-readiness standards have been incorporated into
the K-12 standards, as was promised in the March 10, 2010 draft.
The criteria that we used to
develop the college- and career-readiness standards, as well as these K-12 standards are:
Aligned with college and work expectations;
Include rigorous content
and
application of knowledge through high-order skills;
Build upon strengths and lessons of current state standards;
Informed by top-performing countries, so that all students are prepared to succeed in
our global economy and society; and,
Evidence and/or research-based.
The following links provide more information about the
criteria and considerations for standards development. The standards development process has incorporated the best
practices and research from across the nation and the world. While we have used all available
research to shape these documents, we recognize that there is more to be learned about the
most essential knowledge for student success. As new research is conducted and we evaluate
the implementation of the common core standards, we plan to revise the standards on a set review cycle.
Our organizations would like to thank our advisory group, which provides advice and guidance
on this initiative. Additional thanks are also given to the writers of the standards, who devoted
countless weekends and late nights to ensuring that the standards meet the high expectations for
rigor and clarity.

 

It is the progressive agenda forced on schools. One of the items is that teaching cursive will not happen. Teachers are to be told what to teach and how to teach it. More of the one size fits all mentality of the progressives. Certain issues not allowed and others forced. The progressive view of history teaching the view that America is not exceptional. Nothing about the Constitution including what preceded it, The different discussions that led to different items in the document, or even what it says. The issue of slavery is just taught that America had it and no other country is mentioned including the fact that some countries have it today. No mention that about a million men died over slavery in the Civil war that ended up freeing the slaves. No mention that half of the blacks living here had their ancestors coming here after the Civil War as free immigrants. Lot of other issues with this ugly ramming down the throat of people from the Federal government in an area they have no authority in.

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