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Solar Plants Killing Migratory Birds


Golfboy
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Oops.

But just like the windmills which do the same, liberals won't care about these animals being murdered.

They have an agenda that is much more important than a few pathetic animals.

 

http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/solar-plants-are-burning-birds-wings

 

Two months ago, 34 birds were found dead or injured on the site of the Ivanpah solar plant owned by BrightSource Energy in east San Bernardino County, California. Almost half suffered from singed feathers after running afoul of the plant’s reflected beams of sunlight, according to a report from The Desert Sun. This was not an isolated incident: another 19 were found dead at the 500-megawatt Desert Sunlight plant, which is also located in California.

So what’s going on here? Why are birds dropping like their winged-brethren, flies, around these plants and what can we do?

The Californian desert has become a popular place to build solar energy plants because of the abundant space and, of course, the sun. However, the region also serves as one of the four major north-to-south trajectories for migratory birds: the Pacific Flyway. So while it seems like an ideal locale, birds who fly over these structures face some new and unusual hazards.

When it comes to death by solar farm, birds typically die in one of two ways. In the first, the glimmering sheer of solar panels might trick birds into thinking they are actually part of a body of water. And so the birds, especially waterfowl in this scenario, dive towards the panels, looking for moisture and food, only to find themselves, bones broken, dying in the middle of the arid California sand.

Blunt force trauma aside, others feel the wrath of the harnessed sunlight. At the right (or really, wrong) angle, the potent radiation bouncing off solar mirror’s are enough to burn a bird’s fragile wings, abruptly sending the creature downward towards the ground and impending death. They’re like tragic avian Icaruses, except without an easily digestible moral lesson behind their fatal crashes.

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If the limit of bird deaths to sustain our infrastructure is set so low that this is seen as a problem for solar panels then I presume you believe we should also abandon all coal and oil power too?

 

Yes it isn't ideal, but we don't live in the best of all possible worlds, and have to make difficult choices, though in this case the risk is fairly low and maybe we can work out how to mitigate some of that risk. I wouldn't even class this as in the hard choices, more like the exceedingly easy ones, given the alternatives.

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Oops.

But just like the windmills which do the same, liberals won't care about these animals being murdered.

They have an agenda that is much more important than a few pathetic animals.

 

http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/solar-plants-are-burning-birds-wings

 

Two months ago, 34 birds were found dead or injured on the site of the Ivanpah solar plant owned by BrightSource Energy in east San Bernardino County, California. Almost half suffered from singed feathers after running afoul of the plant’s reflected beams of sunlight, according to a report from The Desert Sun. This was not an isolated incident: another 19 were found dead at the 500-megawatt Desert Sunlight plant, which is also located in California.

So what’s going on here? Why are birds dropping like their winged-brethren, flies, around these plants and what can we do?

The Californian desert has become a popular place to build solar energy plants because of the abundant space and, of course, the sun. However, the region also serves as one of the four major north-to-south trajectories for migratory birds: the Pacific Flyway. So while it seems like an ideal locale, birds who fly over these structures face some new and unusual hazards.

When it comes to death by solar farm, birds typically die in one of two ways. In the first, the glimmering sheer of solar panels might trick birds into thinking they are actually part of a body of water. And so the birds, especially waterfowl in this scenario, dive towards the panels, looking for moisture and food, only to find themselves, bones broken, dying in the middle of the arid California sand.

Blunt force trauma aside, others feel the wrath of the harnessed sunlight. At the right (or really, wrong) angle, the potent radiation bouncing off solar mirror’s are enough to burn a bird’s fragile wings, abruptly sending the creature downward towards the ground and impending death. They’re like tragic avian Icaruses, except without an easily digestible moral lesson behind their fatal crashes.

 

Not again!!! Fcking cons using liberal research to shed crocodile tears over damage to the environmnet. These threads are like Cons bitching about the homeless after cutting homeless funding. What hypocritical bs!!! I wonder how many birds died in the BP Oil spill.

 

 

 

Oops.

But just like the windmills which do the same, liberals won't care about these animals being murdered.

They have an agenda that is much more important than a few pathetic animals.

 

http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/solar-plants-are-burning-birds-wings

 

Two months ago, 34 birds were found dead or injured on the site of the Ivanpah solar plant owned by BrightSource Energy in east San Bernardino County, California. Almost half suffered from singed feathers after running afoul of the plant’s reflected beams of sunlight, according to a report from The Desert Sun. This was not an isolated incident: another 19 were found dead at the 500-megawatt Desert Sunlight plant, which is also located in California.

So what’s going on here? Why are birds dropping like their winged-brethren, flies, around these plants and what can we do?

The Californian desert has become a popular place to build solar energy plants because of the abundant space and, of course, the sun. However, the region also serves as one of the four major north-to-south trajectories for migratory birds: the Pacific Flyway. So while it seems like an ideal locale, birds who fly over these structures face some new and unusual hazards.

When it comes to death by solar farm, birds typically die in one of two ways. In the first, the glimmering sheer of solar panels might trick birds into thinking they are actually part of a body of water. And so the birds, especially waterfowl in this scenario, dive towards the panels, looking for moisture and food, only to find themselves, bones broken, dying in the middle of the arid California sand.

Blunt force trauma aside, others feel the wrath of the harnessed sunlight. At the right (or really, wrong) angle, the potent radiation bouncing off solar mirror’s are enough to burn a bird’s fragile wings, abruptly sending the creature downward towards the ground and impending death. They’re like tragic avian Icaruses, except without an easily digestible moral lesson behind their fatal crashes.

 

 

 

Not again!!! Fcking cons using liberal research to shed crocodile tears over damage to the environmnet. These threads are like Cons bitching about the homeless after cutting homeless funding. What hypocritical bs!!! I wonder how many birds died in the BP Oil spill.

 

this forum is going down again! 1203 pst 11/14/2013

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Last summer our power went out when a bird landed on the wrong spot on the transformer across the street...loud pop and the bird fell dead. Birds get hit by cars,trucks,airplanes. Tall buildings with a lot of glass pose a problem,especially the mirrored glass.

 

However...the biggest cause of dead birds....is cats.



Ever hear of a scarecrow? How about a noisemaker to frighten the birds off? I'm no bird-ologist, but surely there is a practical solution.

Some noise maker is a likely solution.

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While you're cherry-picking, post a few pics of animal rescue efforts during oil spills. Let me guess, all the volunteers are conservatives; not a liberal among them.

 

My guess is some of those performing animal rescue during oil spills are environmentalist types. Traditionally liberal. But animal lovers are sure to be among them and they can't be defined by political ideology so the answer is, the volunteers are most likely a mix of the two.

 

In context of the OP, I thought it fair to highlight golfboy's hypocrisy on the issue of injured animals caught up in agendas.

 

It had nothing to do with rescue efforts.

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Last summer our power went out when a bird landed on the wrong spot on the transformer across the street...loud pop and the bird fell dead. Birds get hit by cars,trucks,airplanes. Tall buildings with a lot of glass pose a problem,especially the mirrored glass.

 

However...the biggest cause of dead birds....is cats.

 

Some noise maker is a likely solution.

 

Last summer our power went out when a bird landed on the wrong spot on the transformer across the street...loud pop and the bird fell dead. Birds get hit by cars,trucks,airplanes. Tall buildings with a lot of glass pose a problem,especially the mirrored glass.

 

However...the biggest cause of dead birds....is cats.

 

Some noise maker is a likely solution.

Bats can out maneuver birds effortlessly - and they are also being wiped out by wind generators. I find a pile of dead bats at one of the ( many ) wind generators along the mountains near me. I go back a few days later to take some photos - and they are gone? When animals get caught in an oil spill, it's 24/7 banner headlines; but God forbid anything negative hits the news when it comes to green energy. Feckin hypocrisy. There is only one degree of death.

 

Last summer our power went out when a bird landed on the wrong spot on the transformer across the street...loud pop and the bird fell dead. Birds get hit by cars,trucks,airplanes. Tall buildings with a lot of glass pose a problem,especially the mirrored glass.

 

However...the biggest cause of dead birds....is cats.

 

 

Cats - not on my property. Any bird that takes refuge on my property is safe from cats.

 

 

Some noise maker is a likely solution.

Right, noise. How about a 24/7 screeching 145 decibel siren.

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Where's those PETA whackjobs I wanna see them protesting green energy for the sake of animals but they is two faced spineless traitorous fucks they done sold they soul to the Democratic Communist party so all's good.

 

Who cares where PETA stands. A legitimate agency is on the case.

 

Wind Power: Voluntary Guidelines Proposed To Avoid Bird Deaths

 

"WASHINGTON — The Fish and Wildlife Service Tuesday proposed voluntary guidelines for onshore wind energy developers to avoid bird deaths and other harm to wildlife as part of the Obama administration's big push for renewable and clean energy.

 

Bird advocates who had lobbied for mandatory standards warned that the new guidelines would do nothing to stem bird deaths as wind power builds up across the country.

 

"We have a responsibility to ensure that solar, wind and geothermal projects are built in the right way and in the right places so they protect our natural and cultural resources and balance the needs of our wildlife," Interior Secretary Ken Salazar said in a statement. President Barack Obama has called for the nation to get 80 percent of its electricity from clean energy sources by 2035, and renewable sources are expected to play a key role in that effort.

 

The department is seeking public comment for its proposed guidelines, which were released ahead of a two-day renewable energy conference in Washington. Among other things, the guidelines call for wind developers to eliminate from consideration areas that would pose high risk to animals and habitat, and to take steps to mitigate harm by, for example, restoring habitat nearby.

"With proper diligence paid to siting, operations and management of projects, it is possible to mitigate for adverse effects" on wildlife, the guidelines say. "This is best accomplished when the developer coordinates as early as possible with the (Fish and Wildlife) Service and other stakeholders."

 

The agency is also proposing new voluntary guidance aimed at preventing deaths of bald and golden eagles.

The American Bird Conservancy said that the wind industry's goal of providing 20 percent of the nation's electricity by 2030 would lead to a million bird deaths a year or more. The group took out print and online advertisements in political publications this week featuring a cartoon bird saying, "Help me get home alive," and asking people to sign a petition calling for mandatory standards.

 

"Let's not fast-track wind energy at the expense of America's birds," said Mike Parr, a vice president with the group. "Just a few small changes need to be made to make wind bird-smart, but without these, wind power simply can't be considered a green technology."

John M. Anderson, director of siting policy at the American Wind Energy Association, said that every form of energy, communication and transportation has an impact on wildlife

 

"We really feel that based on post-construction data that's collected, that there is not a significant impact, and it is far exceeded by other sources of energy production and communication towers," he said. "Why are we being held to a different standard?"

Anderson said that the wind industry has a long history of collaborating with conservation groups to find ways to reduce bird deaths, and noted that wind energy displaces emissions of carbon dioxide blamed for global warming, which has been identified as a big threat to wildlife, including birds.

 

A 2005 Forest Service report estimated that 500 million to possibly more than 1 billion birds are killed in the U.S. every year in collisions with manmade structures such as vehicles, buildings, power lines, telecommunication towers and wind turbines. The report estimated that 550 million are killed by buildings and 130 million by power lines, while only 28,000 are killed by wind turbines; a 2009 report by Fish and Wildlife scientist put the figure at 440,000 annual bird deaths by wind turbines.

 

Despite those lower numbers, the bird group argues that the wind industry is in a unique position because it's at the beginning of a nationwide build-out and can still take steps to minimize bird impacts before that occurs.

 

Last year, a second "State of the Birds" report from the Interior Department found that global climate change poses a significant threat to migratory bird populations. The previous year, the first such report, also released by the Interior secretary, found that all types of energy production – such as wind, ethanol and mountaintop coal mining – were contributing to steep drops in bird populations."

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/02/10/wind-energy-voluntary-gui_n_820708.html

 

Personally, I'm with the American Bird Conservancy - change 'voluntary' to 'mandatory'

 

Companies building these sites (Solar Plants or Wind Farms) have options to choose from when it comes to designing structures that are or are not bird friendly. My guess is, they'll always choose the cheaper option. Make it mandatory that they choose the options that reduce harm to the bird populations.

 

Banning them altogether is no more an answer than banning the drilling of oil offshore. Making them as safe to wildlife as possible is the goal.

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Oops.

But just like the windmills which do the same, liberals won't care about these animals being murdered.

They have an agenda that is much more important than a few pathetic animals.

 

http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/solar-plants-are-burning-birds-wings

 

Two months ago, 34 birds were found dead or injured on the site of the Ivanpah solar plant owned by BrightSource Energy in east San Bernardino County, California. Almost half suffered from singed feathers after running afoul of the plant’s reflected beams of sunlight, according to a report from The Desert Sun. This was not an isolated incident: another 19 were found dead at the 500-megawatt Desert Sunlight plant, which is also located in California.

So what’s going on here? Why are birds dropping like their winged-brethren, flies, around these plants and what can we do?

The Californian desert has become a popular place to build solar energy plants because of the abundant space and, of course, the sun. However, the region also serves as one of the four major north-to-south trajectories for migratory birds: the Pacific Flyway. So while it seems like an ideal locale, birds who fly over these structures face some new and unusual hazards.

When it comes to death by solar farm, birds typically die in one of two ways. In the first, the glimmering sheer of solar panels might trick birds into thinking they are actually part of a body of water. And so the birds, especially waterfowl in this scenario, dive towards the panels, looking for moisture and food, only to find themselves, bones broken, dying in the middle of the arid California sand.

Blunt force trauma aside, others feel the wrath of the harnessed sunlight. At the right (or really, wrong) angle, the potent radiation bouncing off solar mirror’s are enough to burn a bird’s fragile wings, abruptly sending the creature downward towards the ground and impending death. They’re like tragic avian Icaruses, except without an easily digestible moral lesson behind their fatal crashes.

 

Libs care when oil kills a few birds...but windmills kill exponentially more birds than oil.

 

Where are the enviro-left?

 

They're at the hypocrite mardi gras. :)

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Libs care when oil kills a few birds...but windmills kill exponentially more birds than oil.

 

Where are the enviro-left?

 

They're at the hypocrite mardi gras. :)

Are you really this incredibly ignorant and stupid? The toll on marine life courtesy the corrupt and malfeasant BP corporation is exponentially larger than any loss of wildlife because of green energy production.

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Oops.

But just like the windmills which do the same, liberals won't care about these animals being murdered.

They have an agenda that is much more important than a few pathetic animals.

 

http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/solar-plants-are-burning-birds-wings

 

Two months ago, 34 birds were found dead or injured on the site of the Ivanpah solar plant owned by BrightSource Energy in east San Bernardino County, California. Almost half suffered from singed feathers after running afoul of the plant’s reflected beams of sunlight, according to a report from The Desert Sun. This was not an isolated incident: another 19 were found dead at the 500-megawatt Desert Sunlight plant, which is also located in California.

So what’s going on here? Why are birds dropping like their winged-brethren, flies, around these plants and what can we do?

The Californian desert has become a popular place to build solar energy plants because of the abundant space and, of course, the sun. However, the region also serves as one of the four major north-to-south trajectories for migratory birds: the Pacific Flyway. So while it seems like an ideal locale, birds who fly over these structures face some new and unusual hazards.

When it comes to death by solar farm, birds typically die in one of two ways. In the first, the glimmering sheer of solar panels might trick birds into thinking they are actually part of a body of water. And so the birds, especially waterfowl in this scenario, dive towards the panels, looking for moisture and food, only to find themselves, bones broken, dying in the middle of the arid California sand.

Blunt force trauma aside, others feel the wrath of the harnessed sunlight. At the right (or really, wrong) angle, the potent radiation bouncing off solar mirror’s are enough to burn a bird’s fragile wings, abruptly sending the creature downward towards the ground and impending death. They’re like tragic avian Icaruses, except without an easily digestible moral lesson behind their fatal crashes.

 

 

One million animals are killed on America's highways every day, which I invite you to look up before you go on a "prove it!" rant -- I've already sourced it in another thread.

 

Sooo--I'm sure you're going to forget solar and wind, now, because they don't kill anywhere near the number of animals that internal combustion engines do, and start concentrating on ridding the highways of this animal-destroying industry adjunct to the oil and auto industries.

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Are you really this incredibly ignorant and stupid? The toll on marine life courtesy the corrupt and malfeasant BP corporation is exponentially larger than any loss of wildlife because of green energy production.

Well, then it's OK - as long as less animals die from green energy projects. Good to know. Still. green energy is in it's infancy. BUT NOTHING , other than white nose disease is more detrimental to bats than wind turbines. NOTHING !!! I walked past 7 of the many wind generators along the mountains near me; and I counted ( ME - ALONE ) over 40 dead bats. I believe 43.

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Oops.

But just like the windmills which do the same, liberals won't care about these animals being murdered.

They have an agenda that is much more important than a few pathetic animals.

 

http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/solar-plants-are-burning-birds-wings

 

 

Two months ago, 34 birds were found dead or injured on the site of the Ivanpah solar plant owned by BrightSource Energy in east San Bernardino County, California. Almost half suffered from singed feathers after running afoul of the plants reflected beams of sunlight, according to a report from The Desert Sun. This was not an isolated incident: another 19 were found dead at the 500-megawatt Desert Sunlight plant, which is also located in California.

So whats going on here? Why are birds dropping like their winged-brethren, flies, around these plants and what can we do?

The Californian desert has become a popular place to build solar energy plants because of the abundant space and, of course, the sun. However, the region also serves as one of the four major north-to-south trajectories for migratory birds: the Pacific Flyway. So while it seems like an ideal locale, birds who fly over these structures face some new and unusual hazards.

When it comes to death by solar farm, birds typically die in one of two ways. In the first, the glimmering sheer of solar panels might trick birds into thinking they are actually part of a body of water. And so the birds, especially waterfowl in this scenario, dive towards the panels, looking for moisture and food, only to find themselves, bones broken, dying in the middle of the arid California sand.

Blunt force trauma aside, others feel the wrath of the harnessed sunlight. At the right (or really, wrong) angle, the potent radiation bouncing off solar mirrors are enough to burn a birds fragile wings, abruptly sending the creature downward towards the ground and impending death. Theyre like tragic avian Icaruses, except without an easily digestible moral lesson behind their fatal crashes.

Nothing more hilarious than a con showing faux concern for wildlife after a lifetime of putting corporations over the environment and wildlife.

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