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Republicans Reeling As Support For Raising Minimum Wage Surges To 76%


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http://www.politicususa.com/2013/11/11/republicans-reeling-support-raising-minimum-wage-surges-76.html

 

 

 

minimum-wage-485x332.jpg

 

Congressional Republicans have vowed to block any bill raising the minimum wage, but a new Gallup poll shows that 76% of Americans and 58% of Republicans supporting increasing the minimum wage.

 

The Gallup poll found that support for raising the minimum wage to $9.00 an hour has jumped from 71% in March to 76% today. Sixty nine percent of those polled support a minimum wage that increases as inflation goes up. 91% of Democrats, 76% of Independents, and 58% of Republicans support increasing the minimum wage. Democrats (92%) and Independents (71%) strongly support linking the minimum wage to inflation. Fifty six percent of Republicans oppose making the minimum wage inflation proof.

 

While the American people want a higher minimum wage, Republicans in Congress support getting rid of all minimum wage laws. In an interview with CBS, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) said, “I support people making more than $9. I want people to make as much as they can. I don’t think a minimum wage law works. We all support — I certainly do — having more taxpayers, meaning more people who are employed. And I want people to make a lot more than $9 — $9 is not enough. The problem is you can’t do that by mandating it in the minimum wage laws. Minimum wage laws have never worked in terms of having the middle class attain more prosperity.”

Speaker of the House John Boehner likes to make the false argument that raising the minimum wage kills jobs, “When you raise the price of employment, guess what happens? You get less of it.”

 

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) echoed Boehner’s bogus argument that raising the minimum wage kills jobs, “It’s not a question of whether (the federal government) can or cannot. I think that’s decided. I think the question you have to ask is whether or not when you set the minimum wage it may cause unemployment. The least skilled people in our society have more trouble getting work the higher you make the minimum wage.”

 

Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) admitted to Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) that he wants to abolish the minimum wage. Elected Republicans are moving in the opposite direction from the rest of the country. They are even out of step with a majority of their own party on the minimum wage.

Democrats are planning on using the minimum wage issue to help candidates around the country in 2014. The minimum wage is a powerful issue that brings out voters who otherwise might stay home and skip a midterm election. `

 

Republicans are in big trouble on the minimum wage. The elected radical Republicans want to abolish it, while the rest of the country is trying to raise it.

 

This is one of those issues where a pragmatic political party would support a minimum wage increase because opposing it could do serious damage to them in the next election. However, this Republican Party is ideological. They will never support a minimum wage increase, and voters will make them pay dearly at the polls.

 

Democrats need to pound and press, because raising the minimum wage isn’t just a political issue. It’s the right thing to do for millions of hard working Americans.

 

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It’s the right thing to do for millions of hard working Americans.

If the minimum wage is such a great thing, then why is it that none of you chickenshit libs can EVER defend it? Why is it that in every single thread on the minimum wage in which I participate, they all end the exact same way- with me easily destroying every lib in sight and then endlessly bumping the thread to the sound of crickets chirping as all of you have run for the hills? Here is a recent example I have already bumped a couple dozen times to deafening silence- Link.

 

If you really believe in the minimum wage so much, it seems like at least one of you could try to articulate why...

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No skin off my nose, the consumer will pay for it anyway.

No, it won't hurt people like you and me, but it will seriously hurt the lowest-skilled workers, especially minorities. And to think, the liberals always claim that it is us conservatives that are the racists...Lol..

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Silly Skews, the only poll cons care about is the one they don't even understand regarding Obamacare. When the hell do they care what the majority of the country wants? On every issue, other than Obamacare, the baggers have been on the losing end of the polls and they don't give a flying piece of crap. They have these tiny tiny brains and only care about themselves in their tiny tiny lives.

 

 

If the minimum wage is such a great thing, then why is it that none of you chickenshit libs can EVER defend it? Why is it that in every single thread on the minimum wage in which I participate, they all end the exact same way- with me easily destroying every lib in sight and then endlessly bumping the thread to the sound of crickets chirping as all of you have run for the hills? Here is a recent example I have already bumped a couple dozen times to deafening silence- Link.

 

If you really believe in the minimum wage so much, it seems like at least one of you could try to articulate why...

 

 

You mean when you upchuck that stupid question about stereos and refridgerators?

 

I always ignore it and finish my argument and move on.

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You mean when you upchuck that stupid question about stereos and refridgerators?

First of all, I ask that question when debating health insurance, not minimum wage. Secondly, if the question was really so "stupid" then it should be EXTREMELY easy to answer it in a way that proves me wrong. So why can't you or any other lib on this forum ever do that? Hmmm?

 

I always ignore it and finish my argument and move on.

You mean you run away like a scared little pantywaste...

 

You are not going to see me ever just "ignore it" and "move on" if some lib ask me straightforward, simple questions. I will always give an answer and very easily destroy any lib that is asking it. Of course, this is only easy for someone who is on the correct side of an argument.

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First of all, I ask that question when debating health insurance, not minimum wage. Secondly, if the question was really so "stupid" then it should be EXTREMELY easy to answer it in a way that proves me wrong. So why can't you or any other lib on this forum ever do that? Hmmm?

 

You mean you run away like a scared little pantywaste...

 

You are not going to see me ever just "ignore it" and "move on" if some lib ask me straightforward, simple questions. I will always give an answer and very easily destroy any lib that is asking it. Of course, this is only easy for someone who is on the correct side of an argument.

I answered that question last time. I got tired of seeing it and nobody giving it a shot. It really was a matter so simple, I didn't want to dignify it with any effort.

 

and you generally don't ask it straight out to someone specifically. You just throw it out there with nobody's quotes.

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Republicans Reeling As Support For Raising Minimum Wage Surges To 76%

 

Oh my, I'm just reeling! :glare:

 

Almost all economists admit that doing so only loses jobs and hurts the economy.

 

Another stupid, failed liberal policy that hurts Americans.

 

Democrats need to pound and press, because raising the minimum wage isn’t just a political issue. It’s the right thing to do for millions of hard working Americans.

 

It's a sop to unions, while hurting ordinary Americans.

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I answered that question last time. I got tired of seeing it and nobody giving it a shot. It really was a matter so simple, I didn't want to dignify it with any effort.

 

and you generally don't ask it straight out to someone specifically. You just throw it out there with nobody's quotes.

Well then I must have missed the post, because I have only seen about 2 libs ever answer it correctly on this forum, out of at least 100 times I have asked it. Do you have a link?

 

And if one of you libs just "throws out" a question over 100 times and almost no conservatives will answer it, I will gladly step up to the plate if it a subject with which I disagree. You aren't going to find me running away like a little sniveling coward.

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http://www.politicususa.com/2013/11/11/republicans-reeling-support-raising-minimum-wage-surges-76.html

 

 

 

minimum-wage-485x332.jpg

 

Congressional Republicans have vowed to block any bill raising the minimum wage, but a new Gallup poll shows that 76% of Americans and 58% of Republicans supporting increasing the minimum wage.

 

The Gallup poll found that support for raising the minimum wage to $9.00 an hour has jumped from 71% in March to 76% today. Sixty nine percent of those polled support a minimum wage that increases as inflation goes up. 91% of Democrats, 76% of Independents, and 58% of Republicans support increasing the minimum wage. Democrats (92%) and Independents (71%) strongly support linking the minimum wage to inflation. Fifty six percent of Republicans oppose making the minimum wage inflation proof.

 

While the American people want a higher minimum wage, Republicans in Congress support getting rid of all minimum wage laws. In an interview with CBS, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) said, “I support people making more than $9. I want people to make as much as they can. I don’t think a minimum wage law works. We all support — I certainly do — having more taxpayers, meaning more people who are employed. And I want people to make a lot more than $9 — $9 is not enough. The problem is you can’t do that by mandating it in the minimum wage laws. Minimum wage laws have never worked in terms of having the middle class attain more prosperity.”

Speaker of the House John Boehner likes to make the false argument that raising the minimum wage kills jobs, “When you raise the price of employment, guess what happens? You get less of it.”

 

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) echoed Boehner’s bogus argument that raising the minimum wage kills jobs, “It’s not a question of whether (the federal government) can or cannot. I think that’s decided. I think the question you have to ask is whether or not when you set the minimum wage it may cause unemployment. The least skilled people in our society have more trouble getting work the higher you make the minimum wage.”

 

Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) admitted to Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) that he wants to abolish the minimum wage. Elected Republicans are moving in the opposite direction from the rest of the country. They are even out of step with a majority of their own party on the minimum wage.

Democrats are planning on using the minimum wage issue to help candidates around the country in 2014. The minimum wage is a powerful issue that brings out voters who otherwise might stay home and skip a midterm election. `

 

Republicans are in big trouble on the minimum wage. The elected radical Republicans want to abolish it, while the rest of the country is trying to raise it.

 

This is one of those issues where a pragmatic political party would support a minimum wage increase because opposing it could do serious damage to them in the next election. However, this Republican Party is ideological. They will never support a minimum wage increase, and voters will make them pay dearly at the polls.

 

Democrats need to pound and press, because raising the minimum wage isn’t just a political issue. It’s the right thing to do for millions of hard working Americans.

 

 

 

Who cares? 5% of the pulbic makes minimum wage and half are 26 and under. It's a non-issue unless you're a dopey pot smoking pimply faced progressive living in mom's basement.

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The Minimum Wage should be $20 an hour --

 

and we should be dealing with the concept of the Minimum Wage as a Living Wage --

 

 

Meanwhile, keep in mind that the government has been lying to citizens about the rate

of inflation since the Vietnam War.

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Is the OP after a raise???

 

The only reason these stooges bring it up is some union wages are tied to minimum wage. If it wasn't for THAT, you'd NEVER hear a peep.

 

The Minimum Wage should be $20 an hour --

 

and we should be dealing with the concept of the Minimum Wage as a Living Wage --

 

 

Meanwhile, keep in mind that the government has been lying to citizens about the rate

of inflation since the Vietnam War.

 

You don't deserve a "living wage". You deserve wages based on employee performance and the level of skill/education needed for your particular job.

 

NO ONE owes you a "living wage" so if you "think" you're entitled to one? Swim over to Europe and apply for a work visa.

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http://www.politicususa.com/2013/11/11/republicans-reeling-support-raising-minimum-wage-surges-76.html

 

 

 

minimum-wage-485x332.jpg

 

Congressional Republicans have vowed to block any bill raising the minimum wage, but a new Gallup poll shows that 76% of Americans and 58% of Republicans supporting increasing the minimum wage.

 

The Gallup poll found that support for raising the minimum wage to $9.00 an hour has jumped from 71% in March to 76% today. Sixty nine percent of those polled support a minimum wage that increases as inflation goes up. 91% of Democrats, 76% of Independents, and 58% of Republicans support increasing the minimum wage. Democrats (92%) and Independents (71%) strongly support linking the minimum wage to inflation. Fifty six percent of Republicans oppose making the minimum wage inflation proof.

 

While the American people want a higher minimum wage, Republicans in Congress support getting rid of all minimum wage laws. In an interview with CBS, Sen. Marco Rubio (R-FL) said, “I support people making more than $9. I want people to make as much as they can. I don’t think a minimum wage law works. We all support — I certainly do — having more taxpayers, meaning more people who are employed. And I want people to make a lot more than $9 — $9 is not enough. The problem is you can’t do that by mandating it in the minimum wage laws. Minimum wage laws have never worked in terms of having the middle class attain more prosperity.”

Speaker of the House John Boehner likes to make the false argument that raising the minimum wage kills jobs, “When you raise the price of employment, guess what happens? You get less of it.”

 

Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) echoed Boehner’s bogus argument that raising the minimum wage kills jobs, “It’s not a question of whether (the federal government) can or cannot. I think that’s decided. I think the question you have to ask is whether or not when you set the minimum wage it may cause unemployment. The least skilled people in our society have more trouble getting work the higher you make the minimum wage.”

 

Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) admitted to Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) that he wants to abolish the minimum wage. Elected Republicans are moving in the opposite direction from the rest of the country. They are even out of step with a majority of their own party on the minimum wage.

Democrats are planning on using the minimum wage issue to help candidates around the country in 2014. The minimum wage is a powerful issue that brings out voters who otherwise might stay home and skip a midterm election. `

 

Republicans are in big trouble on the minimum wage. The elected radical Republicans want to abolish it, while the rest of the country is trying to raise it.

 

This is one of those issues where a pragmatic political party would support a minimum wage increase because opposing it could do serious damage to them in the next election. However, this Republican Party is ideological. They will never support a minimum wage increase, and voters will make them pay dearly at the polls.

 

Democrats need to pound and press, because raising the minimum wage isn’t just a political issue. It’s the right thing to do for millions of hard working Americans.

 

 

I really don't give a rat's a55, I pay everyone here well above minimum, if that's all someone is getting paid they are probably getting what they're worth. Most people who make minimum are either very young or dumb as a bag of rocks, sometimes both, the exception is old folks who didn't plan their retirement well. Damn ya'll Libs are the biggest bunch of cry babies ever, there's no end to your begging. If someone wants more money go make it, don't take it. Libs are a perfect example to if you give em an inch they'll take a mile, I wouldn't have one of bitche5 around this place.

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The Minimum Wage should be $20 an hour --

 

and we should be dealing with the concept of the Minimum Wage as a Living Wage --

And what about the lowest-skilled workers, especially unskilled blacks, that will be unemployed completely because of such moronic policies? Do you not give a flying shit about them?

 

Or are you just some kind of racist klan member that intentionally wants to hurt blacks?

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How about a nice dose of facts, from the US Dept. of Labor?

 

Making Work Pay

The Case for Raising the Minimum Wage

 

Office of the Chief Economist March 1996

 

 

This document was prepared in early 1996 to outline the case for raising the minimum wage. It outlines who earns the minimum wage and answers questions about the likely impact of raising the minimum.

 

 

 

NOTE: The full report is also available in PDF format. In order to view PDF documents you must have a PDF viewer ( (e.g., Amber or Acrobat Reader) available on your workstation.

 

Fact Sheet

Americans know a raise in the minimum wage is one way to help make work pay. For many working Americans an increase in the minimum wage will make the difference between living in poverty and not. Furthermore, a higher minimum wage -- a floor to ensure workers that they're getting a fair deal for their efforts -- provides a foothold into the middle class for many other families.

The Problem: The Minimum Wage is Worth Less Than It Used to Be

The Federal minimum wage is currently $4.25 per hour. Adjusted for inflation, the value of the minimum wage has fallen by nearly 50 cents since it was last increased in 1991, and is now 29% lower than it was in 1979. If left unchanged, its real value will be at a forty-year low by January 1997.

Raising the minimum wage is one way to make work pay. A recent study concluded that the decline in the real value of the minimum wage since 1979 accounts for 20% of the rise in wage inequality for men, and 30% for women (see DiNardo, Lemieux & Fortin). According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 3.66 million workers paid by the hour earn at or below the minimum wage. An increase in this living wage is a strong response to the stagnant incomes that many of these workers face.

Many Adults Rely on the Minimum Wage as a Living Wage

Contrary to popular opinion, the average worker affected by an increase in the minimum wage is not just a teenager flipping hamburgers. Only one in fourteen is a teenage student from a family with above average earnings.

The fact is, almost two-thirds of minimum wage workers are adults, and four in ten are the sole bread winner of their family.

Increasing the Minimum Wage Lifts Families out of Poverty

Twenty percent of those living on the minimum wage the last time it was raised in 1991 were in poverty, and an additional 13% were near poverty. In 1993, the President expanded the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), which raised income for 15 million families, helping many working families move above the poverty line. Yet to complete the goal of insuring that full-time working families are out of poverty, we need to raise the minimum wage. Recent analysis by the Economic Policy Institute and preliminary work by the Department of Health and Human Services suggests that 300,000 people would be lifted out of poverty if the minimum wage was raised to $5.15 per hour. This figure includes 100,000 children who are currently living in poverty.

The current poverty line for a family of 4 is $15,600. A family of 4 with one worker earning $4.25 an hour and working full-time year round ($8,500) would receive a tax credit of $3,400 under the 1996 provisions of the EITC, will collect food stamps worth $3,5l6, and will pay $650 in payroll taxes. This family would end up $834 below the poverty line. On the other hand, for a family of 4 with one worker earning $l0,300 (a full-time year round worker at $5.l5 per hour), the EITC would provide the maximum tax credit ($3,560), food stamps would provide $2,876, and they would pay $788 in payroll taxes. The increase in the minimum wage -- along with EITC and food stamps -- would lift this family out of poverty.

What a Moderate Increase in the Minimum Wage Would Mean for Workers

The President's proposal to raise the minimum wage by $.90 would generate $1800 in potential income for minimum wage workers.

Based on expenditure patterns of an average family, $1800 would buy:

  • Seven months of groceries
  • One year of health care costs, including insurance premiums, prescription drugs, and out- of-pocket costs
  • Nine months' worth of utility bills
  • More than a full-year's tuition at a 2-year college
  • Basic housing costs for almost 4 months

Many Working Women Depend upon the Minimum Wage

Fifty nine percent of workers earning from $4.25 to $5.14 per hour are women; of those, 72 percent are adults 20 years old or over. The President's proposal to increase the minimum wage would raise wages of more than 5.7 million working women. This includes more than 950,000 African-American women and 760,000 women of Hispanic origin. Single heads of households, who are often women, represent over one-fifth of all families who currently rely on the earnings of a worker making $4.25 to $5.14 per hour.

A Moderate Increase in the Minimum Wage Does Not Cost Jobs

The standard criticism of the minimum wage is that it raises employers' costs and reduces employment opportunities for teenagers and disadvantaged workers. However, several studies have found that the last two increases in the minimum wage had an insignificant effect on employment. Furthermore, an extension of the time-series studies that had previously been used to claim that raising the minimum wage decreases employment, no longer finds a significant impact.

In a recent review of the literature, Professor Richard Freeman of Harvard, a widely respected labor economist, wrote: "At the level of the minimum wage in the late 1980s, moderate legislated increases did not reduce employment and were, if anything, associated with higher employment in some locales."

In discussing the minimum wage, Robert M. Solow, a Nobel laureate in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, recently told the New York Times, "The main thing about (minimum wage) research is that the evidence of job loss is weak. And the fact that the evidence is weak suggests that the impact on jobs is small."

Americans Want an Increase in the Minimum Wage

The American public supports increasing the minimum wage by a solid margin. Nearly every survey finds overwhelming support for raising the minimum wage. For example, a national poll conducted in January 1995 for the Los Angeles Times found that 72% of Americans backed an increase in the wage, confirming a December 1994 Wall Street Journal/NBC News survey that found raising the minimum wage is favored by 75%.

Despite expected criticism in some corners, the minimum wage has traditionally had bipartisan support. In 1989, the minimum wage increase passed the House by a vote of 382 to 37 (with 135 Republicans voting for the bill), and 89 to 8 in the Senate (with the support of 36 Republicans).

Currently, ten states and the District of Columbia have minimum wages that exceed the Federal minimum wage (Alaska, Connecticut, Hawaii, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington). Delaware is expected to pass legislation that will raise its minimum wage on April 15, 1996. Hawaii's minimum wage is $5.25 an hour and Massachusetts will match this in January 1997; New Jersey's is $5.05.

The Minimum Wage

Myth and Reality

The federal minimum wage now stands at $4.25 per hour. A person who works full-time all year long at that wage earns only $8500 in a year. The buying power of the minimum wage is already 29 percent lower than in 1979 -- and if left unchanged, will be at its lowest point in 40 years by January 1997. To restore that buying power and to make work pay, the President has challenged Congress to raise the minimum wage.

But the debate has been muddied by several myths that anti-minimum wage forces repeat at every opportunity.

Myth: The only Americans working for the minimum wage are teenagers.

Reality: 63 percent of minimum-wage workers are adults age 20 or over. (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Myth: Minimum wage workers don't support families.

Reality: The last time the federal minimum wage was increased, the average minimum wage worker brought home 51 percent of his or her family's weekly earnings. (Source: Analysis of Census Bureau's Current Population Survey by Professors David Card and Alan Krueger)

Myth: Raising the minimum wage hurts the poor by causing job loss.

Reality: Nearly 10 million working Americans would get a pay raise if the minimum wage is increased to $5.l5 per hour. As Nobel Prize-winning economist Robert Solow said, "[T]he evidence of job loss is weak. And the fact that the evidence is weak suggests that the impact on jobs is small." (Source: New York Times, January 12, 1995)

Myth: The only study showing that raising the minimum wage does not cost jobs was a study funded by the U.S. Labor Department.

Reality: One major study -- conducted in 1992 and financed by Princeton University and the University of Wisconsin -- was published by two Princeton University economists. One of those economists later joined the Labor Department. (Source: Washington Post, January 11, 1995) Furthermore, a similar conclusion has been reached by at least ten other independent studies.

Myth: Raising the minimum wage will have a negligible impact on people's lives.

Reality: A 90-cent per hour increase in the minimum wage means an additional $l,800 for a minimum wage earner who works full-time, year round -- as much as the average family spends on groceries in more than 7 months. (Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics)

Myth: Increasing the minimum wage has always been a bitter, partisan issue that only Democrats have supported.

Reality: In 1989, the last time the minimum wage was increased, the House of Representatives vote in favor of the proposal was 382 to 37, and the Senate vote was 89 to 8. Indeed, Senator Dole said at the time, "[T]his is not an issue where we ought to be standing and holding up anybody's getting a 30 to 40 cents an hour pay increase, at the same time that we're talking about capital gains. I never thought the Republican Party should stand for squeezing every last nickel from the minimum wage." (Source: Congressional Quarterly Almanac 1989)

Making Work Pay

Questions and Answers on Raising the Minimum Wage


With unemployment at its lowest level in years, should we be tinkering with the minimum wage? Won't an increase in the minimum wage hinder the creation of new jobs?

The minimum wage is currently valued at 29% lower in real terms than it was in 1979.

A number of recent studies have found that a moderate rise in the minimum wage has little, if any, affect on job creation starting at such a low level. In fact, "The impact of a minimum wage rise on jobs is small," the New York Times quoted Nobel Laureate Robert Solow as saying. The Times also reported that economists agree that a minimum wage rise will lift the incomes of low wage workers.

Isn't the minimum wage poorly targeted to people in poverty? The Democratic Leadership Council reports that a number of minimum wage workers are in households with earnings higher than the median worker. Wouldn't a rise in the minimum wage just help middle class teenagers?

Although some people who earn the minimum wage are teenagers, almost two-thirds are adults age 20 and older. The average minimum wage worker brings home about half of his or her family's earnings. Increasing the minimum wage will help these workers to make up for lost ground due to inflation -- it will help make work pay.

The minimum wage provides a foothold into the middle class. A family with two full-time year round workers would earn $20,600 a year with a $5.l5 minimum wage.

Wouldn't a rise in the minimum wage hurt minorities and the disadvantaged due to job loss?

As the New York Times reported, most economists agree that raising the minimum wage increases the incomes of low wage workers, which more than offsets any effect on jobs. Further, studies of minimum wage increases fail to show disproportionate impacts for minority youth.

Additionally, public support for a minimum wage increase is strong. A January 1995 Los Angeles Times poll found that 72% of Americans back an increase, confirming a December 1994 Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll that found that 75% of adults favored a rise in the minimum wage.

How many workers are affected by a rise in the minimum wage?

An estimated 10 million hourly paid workers earn between $4.25 and $5.14, and would directly benefit from the President's proposal to increase the minimum wage.

How can you contemplate a rise in the minimum wage with a new Congress intent on getting government off the backs of business?

The minimum wage has historically enjoyed bipartisan support. Sens. Dole and Kassenbaum, Speaker Gingrich and Rep. Goodling voted for the last minimum wage increase to $4.25 an hour in 1989.

Governors across the country are fighting against unfunded mandates. Isn't the minimum wage an unfunded mandate on businesses and states?

The minimum wage is not a new unfunded mandate. In fact, given the erosion of the value of the minimum wage over the last 15 years it is now much less of a mandate on businesses and the public sector than it used to be.

What do you say to all the businesses that say they will lose profit and possibly go bankrupt if the minimum wage is raised? Aren't you just antagonizing the business community by proposing a minimum wage increase?

Inflation has eroded the minimum wage so much that it is currently at its second lowest level since the 1950s. The economy has been very strong, but wages have not grown as much as they need to for the middle class to keep up.

The Clinton Administration has pursued economic policies to put our fiscal house in order, laying the foundation for the current economic expansion. But the problem is that low- wage and middle class workers have not shared fully in this recovery.

 

http://www.dol.gov/dol/aboutdol/history/reich/reports/pay.htm

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Oh my, I'm just reeling! :glare:

 

Almost all economists admit that doing so only loses jobs and hurts the economy.

 

Another stupid, failed liberal policy that hurts Americans.

 

 

It's a sop to unions, while hurting ordinary Americans.

I disagree that there's a consensus on minimum wage amongst economists. Many states have higher minimum wages than federal minimums with no discernable change in unemployment rate. Then there are examples like Trader Joes and Costco's that hire way above minimum wage yet are very profitable with the lowest prices in the retail industry.

 

It's also a federal budget issue. The more employees make the less they need of welfare services. Probably the healthiest way to cut spending in welfare programs is to raise the minimum wage. This is just another example of conflict within your ideology. Cuts food stamps AND don't raise the minimum wage. That's a contradictory opinion to hold.

 

And what about the lowest-skilled workers, especially unskilled blacks, that will be unemployed completely because of such moronic policies? Do you not give a flying shit about them?

 

Or are you just some kind of racist klan member that intentionally wants to hurt blacks?

For every study that supports your racist view, I can show you a study that contradicts it. There is the opinion that it will affect small businesses the most, but won't have any impact on retailers that employ almost a majority of minimum wage workers. There really isn't a consensus on this issue among economists. As I've mentioned before, there are way too many aspects to our complex economy to be totally sure about one ideology. Predicting impact of programs on the economy is about as easy as predicting next month's weather.

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I would like to see the demographic breakdown by party affiliation and how many union members were polled. Man Unions base their pay scale on a percentage above the minimum wage. If the minimum wage is increased they either get a pay raise or trigger a new bargaining agreement.



I disagree that there's a consensus on minimum wage amongst economists. Many states have higher minimum wages than federal minimums with no discernable change in unemployment rate. Then there are examples like Trader Joes and Costco's that hire way above minimum wage yet are very profitable with the lowest prices in the retail industry.

 

It's also a federal budget issue. The more employees make the less they need of welfare services. Probably the healthiest way to cut spending in welfare programs is to raise the minimum wage. This is just another example of conflict within your ideology. Cuts food stamps AND don't raise the minimum wage. That's a contradictory opinion to hold.



For every study that supports your racist view, I can show you a study that contradicts it. There is the opinion that it will affect small businesses the most, but won't have any impact on retailers that employ almost a majority of minimum wage workers. There really isn't a consensus on this issue among economists. As I've mentioned before, there are way too many aspects to our complex economy to be totally sure about one ideology. Predicting impact of programs on the economy is about as easy as predicting next month's weather.

 

 

It's also a federal budget issue. The more employees make the less they need of welfare services. Probably the healthiest way to cut spending in welfare programs is to raise the minimum wage. This is just another example of conflict within your ideology. Cuts food stamps AND don't raise the minimum wage. That's a contradictory opinion to hold.

 

 

That is not an issue in theory. Of course one would agree. Exactly where are businesses that are struggling now gonna find the money to increase pay without an increase in business?

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When they raise it, and they will, there will be less part time obamajobs. Prices will rise. This bill will hurt the entry level youth, the unskilled and minorities. Black youth unemployment now %36. Why do libs hate the blacks? Wages should be whatever the market will sustain. A job at any pay is better than no job. A local kid mows my lawn and rakes the leaves. It takes him about 2 hours. I give him $10 and he comes back every week. He is happy. I am happy. If he demands $20 for 2 hrs work I will fire him and hire another kid. If all kids demand $20 (which will never happen) i will mow the lawn myself and save the $10. The kid I have mowing and raking is so hungry for money he wants to snow-blow my driveway in the winter. Price to be negotiated.

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In discussing the minimum wage, Robert M. Solow, a Nobel laureate in economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, recently told the New York Times, "The main thing about (minimum wage) research is that the evidence of job loss is weak. And the fact that the evidence is weak suggests that the impact on jobs is small."

The evidence is "weak"?!?!? Lol... Let's just take a look at some of this "weak" evidence, shall we? Link1

 

Summary of Research on the Minimum Wage

 

  • The minimum wage reduces employment. Currie and Fallick (1993), Gallasch (1975), Gardner (1981), Peterson (1957), Peterson and Stewart (1969).
  • The minimum wage reduces employment more among teenagers than adults. Adie (1973); Brown, Gilroy and Kohen (1981a, 1981b); Fleisher (1981); Hammermesh (1982); Meyer and Wise (1981, 1983a); Minimum Wage Study Commission (1981); Neumark and Wascher (1992); Ragan (1977); Vandenbrink (1987); Welch (1974, 1978); Welch and Cunningham (1978).
  • The minimum wage reduces employment most among black teenage males. Al-Salam, Quester, and Welch (1981), Iden (1980), Mincer (1976), Moore (1971), Ragan (1977), Williams (1977a, 1977b).
  • The minimum wage helped South African whites at the expense of blacks. Bauer (1959).
  • The minimum wage hurts blacks generally. Behrman, Sickles and Taubman (1983); Linneman (1982).
  • The minimum wage hurts the unskilled. Krumm (1981).
  • The minimum wage hurts low wage workers. Brozen (1962), Cox and Oaxaca (1986), Gordon (1981).
  • The minimum wage hurts low wage workers particularly during cyclical downturns. Kosters and Welch (1972), Welch (1974).
  • The minimum wage increases job turnover. Hall (1982).
  • The minimum wage reduces average earnings of young workers. Meyer and Wise (1983b).
  • The minimum wage drives workers into uncovered jobs, thus lowering wages in those sectors. Brozen (1962), Tauchen (1981), Welch (1974).
  • The minimum wage reduces employment in low-wage industries, such as retailing. Cotterman (1981), Douty (1960), Fleisher (1981), Hammermesh (1981), Peterson (1981).
  • The minimum wage hurts small businesses generally. Kaun (1965).
  • The minimum wage causes employers to cut back on training. Hashimoto (1981, 1982), Leighton and Mincer (1981), Ragan (1981).
  • The minimum wage has long-term effects on skills and lifetime earnings. Brozen (1969), Feldstein (1973).
  • The minimum wage leads employers to cut back on fringe benefits. McKenzie (1980), Wessels (1980).
  • The minimum wage encourages employers to install labor-saving devices. Trapani and Moroney (1981).
  • The minimum wage hurts low-wage regions, such as the South and rural areas. Colberg (1960, 1981), Krumm (1981).
  • The minimum wage increases the number of people on welfare. Brandon (1995), Leffler (1978).
  • The minimum wage hurts the poor generally. Stigler (1946).
  • The minimum wage does little to reduce poverty. Bonilla (1992), Brown (1988), Johnson and Browning (1983), Kohen and Gilroy (1981), Parsons (1980), Smith and Vavrichek (1987).
  • The minimum wage helps upper income families. Bell (1981), Datcher and Loury (1981), Johnson and Browning (1981), Kohen and Gilroy (1981).
  • The minimum wage helps unions. Linneman (1982), Cox and Oaxaca (1982).
  • The minimum wage lowers the capital stock. McCulloch (1981).
  • The minimum wage increases inflationary pressure. Adams (1987), Brozen (1966), Gramlich (1976), Grossman (1983).
  • The minimum wage increases teenage crime rates. Hashimoto (1987), Phillips (1981).
  • The minimum wage encourages employers to hire illegal aliens. Beranek (1982).
  • Few workers are permanently stuck at the minimum wage. Brozen (1969), Smith and Vavrichek (1992).
  • The minimum wage has had a massive impact on unemployment in Puerto Rico. Freeman and Freeman (1991), Rottenberg (1981b).
  • The minimum wage has reduced employment in foreign countries. Canada: Forrest (1982); Chile: Corbo (1981); Costa Rica: Gregory (1981); France: Rosa (1981).
  • Characteristics of minimum wage workers Employment Policies Institute (1994), Haugen and Mellor (1990), Kniesner (1981), Mellor (1987), Mellor and Haugen (1986), Smith and Vavrichek (1987), Van Giezen (1994).

 

 

Link2

 

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Sabia - United States Military Academy at West Point Failed Stimulus: Minimum Wage Increases and Their Failure to Boost Gross Domestic Product Minimum Wage 08/31/2010 Nicole Coomer - Workers Compensation Research Institute, Walter Wessels - North Carolina State University The Erosion of the Entry-Level Job Market: Minimum Wage Increases and their Impact on Minimum Wage Workers Minimum Wage, Teen Unemployment 07/21/2010 William E. Even - Miami University; David A. Macpherson - Trinity University The Teen Employment Crisis: The Effects of the 2007 – 2009 Federal Minimum Wage Increases on Teen Employment Minimum Wage, Teen Unemployment 06/28/2010 William C. Wood - James Madison University Literacy and the Entry-Level Workforce: The Role of Literacy and Policy in Labor Market Success Minimum Wage 03/09/2010 John P. Formby - University of Alabama, John A. Bishop - East Carolina University, Hoseong Kim - University of Alabama What’s Best At Reducing Poverty? 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Brandon - Brown University Examining Effects of Minimum Wages on Single Mothers’ Exits from Welfare Minimum Wage 01/31/2008 Joseph J. Sabia - University of Georgia, Richard V. Burkhauser - Cornell University Good Intentions Are Not Enough: Why Raising New York’s Minimum Wage Continues to be a Poor Way to Help the Working Poor Minimum Wage 09/26/2007 Employment Policies Institute Helping Low-wage Americans: The Earned Income Tax Credit Minimum Wage 09/17/2007 Dr. Helen Levy - University of Michigan, Dr. Katherine Baicker - Harvard University Employer Health Insurance Mandates and the Risk of Unemployment Overtime 09/14/2007 Dr. Richard Burkhauser and Dr. Kosali Simon, Cornell University Who Gets What From Employer “Pay or Play” Mandates Overtime 09/06/2007 Joseph J. Sabia The Impact of Minimum Wage Increases on Single Mothers Minimum Wage 07/19/2007 The Survey Center - University of New Hampshire 2007 EPI Minimum Wage Survey of Labor Economists Minimum Wage 02/26/2007 Ellen Meara, Meredith Rosenthal, and Anna Sinaiko Comparing The Effects Of Health Insurance Reform Proposals: Employer Mandates, Medicaid Expansions, and Tax Credits Overtime 01/15/2007 David Neumark Minimum Wage Effects in the Post-welfare Reform Era Minimum Wage, Teen Unemployment 09/25/2006 David Macpherson - Florida State University The Effects of the Proposed Arizona Minimum Wage Increase Minimum Wage 08/24/2006 David A. Macpherson The Effects of the Proposed Missouri Minimum Wage Increase Minimum Wage 07/01/2006 Employment Policies Institute Rotten ACORN: America’s Bad Seed Living Wage 06/15/2006 Daniel Aaronson, Eric French Output Prices and the Minimum Wage Minimum Wage 05/12/2006 Joseph J. Sabia - University of Georgia The Effect of Minimum Wage Increases on Retail and Small Business Employment Minimum Wage, Teen Unemployment 04/11/2006 Dr. Aaron Yelowitz - University of Kentucky The “Fair Share for Health Care Act” and New York’s Labor Market Overtime 03/01/2006 David A. Macpherson - Florida State University The Effects of the Proposed Ohio Minimum Wage Increase Minimum Wage 01/24/2006 Katherine Baicker, University of California at Los Angeles, Amitabh Chandra, Harvard University The Effect of Increases in Health Insurance Premiums on Labor Market Outcomes Overtime 01/20/2006 The Employment Policies Institute Helping Low-wage Americans–The Earned Income Tax Credit: An Effective Solution to an Age-old Problem Minimum Wage 01/16/2006 Robert W. Fairlie - University of California, Santa Cruz and Rebecca A. London, University of California, Santa Cruz An Analysis of the Dynamics of Health Insurance Coverage and Implications for Employer-Mandated Insurance Overtime 12/15/2005 John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard and Daniel P. Kessler Making Markets Work: Five Steps To A Better Health Care System Overtime 12/01/2005 Dr. Aaron Yelowitz - University of Kentucky How Did the $8.50 Citywide Minimum Wage Affect the Santa Fe Labor Market? A Comprehensive Examination Minimum Wage 09/27/2005 Dr. Aaron Yelowitz - University of Kentucky Santa Fe’s Living Wage and the Labor Market Living Wage 09/15/2005 Employment Policies Institute The Real ACORN: Anti-Employee, Anti-Union, Big-Business Living Wage 09/01/2005 David A. Macpherson - Florida State University The Effects of the Proposed Pennsylvania Minimum Wage Increase Minimum Wage 08/01/2005 Richard V. Burkhauser - Cornell University, Joseph J. Sabia - University of Georgia Raising the Minimum Wage: Another Empty Promise to the Working Poor Minimum Wage 06/01/2005 Katherine Baicker - Dartmouth University, Helen Levy - University of Michigan Employer Health Insurance Mandates and the Risk of Unemployment Overtime 05/23/2005 Dr. Aaron Yelowitz - University of Kentucky, Dr. Richard Toikka - Lewin Group Effective Tax Rates and the Living Wage Living Wage 02/16/2005 Employment Policies Institute The Cost of Washington’s Health Care Responsibility Act Overtime 10/13/2004 Employment Policies Institute UPDATED: The Real ACORN: Anti-Employee, Anti-Union, Big-Business 09/27/2004 Dr. Aaron Yelowitz - University of Kentucky The Economic Impact of Proposition 72 on California Employers Overtime 08/26/2004 Dr. David Macpherson - Florida State University, Craig Garthwaite - Employment Policies Institute The Effects of the Proposed California Minimum Wage Increase Minimum Wage 08/13/2004 Dr. Peter Arcidiacono - Duke University, Dr. Thomas Ahn - Duke University Minimum Wages and Job Search: What Do Employment Effects Really Measure Minimum Wage 07/21/2004 Dr. Richard Burkhauser - Cornell University, Dr. Joseph Sabia - Cornell University Raising New York’s Minimum Wage: A Poor Way to Help the Working Poor Minimum Wage 07/01/2004 Dr. Richard Burkhauser - Cornell University, Dr. Joseph Sabia - Cornell University Why Raising the Minimum Wage is a Poor Way to Help the Working Poor Minimum Wage 06/03/2004 William E. Even - Miami University of Ohio, David Macpherson - Florida State University Wage Growth Among Minimum Wage Workers Minimum Wage 05/01/2004 Employment Policies Institute Helping Low-Wage Americans – Wage Based Tax Credits: A New Solution to an Age Old Problem Minimum Wage 04/01/2004 Craig Garthwaite Minimum Wage And Its Effects On Small Business Minimum Wage 04/01/2004 Dr. Thomas MaCurdy - Stanford University, Dr. Frank McIntyre - Brigham Young University Helping Working-Poor Families Minimum Wage 10/01/2003 Dr. Aaron Yelowitz - University of Kentucky The Cost of California’s Health Insurance Act of 2003 Overtime 08/01/2003 Dr. Peter Mueser and Dr. Kenneth R. Troske - University of Missouri Welfare Reform and its Effect on the Dynamics of Welfare Receipt, Employment, and Earnings 07/15/2003 Employment Policies Institute San Francisco Residents Oppose Minimum Wage Hike Minimum Wage 07/01/2003 Employment Policies Institute Where the Jobs Aren’t: Local Unemployment Spreads Minimum Wage 05/01/2003 Employment Policies Institute The Real ACORN: Anti-Employee, Anti-Union, Big Business 03/01/2003 Employment Policies Institute Indexing the Minimum Wage: A Vise on Entry-Level Wages Minimum Wage 02/01/2003 Dr. David A. Macpherson - Florida State University The Effects of the Proposed Santa Fe Minimum Wage Increase Minimum Wage 01/01/2003 Mark Turner - Georgetown University, Burt S. Barnow - Johns Hopkins University Living Wage and Earned Income Tax Credit: A Comparative Analysis Living Wage 10/01/2002 Dr. Richard H. Sander - University of California Los Angeles, Dr. E. Douglass Williams - University of the South, and Mr. Joseph Doherty - Empirical Research Group at UCLA The Economic and Distributional Consequences of the Santa Monica Minimum Wage Ordinance Living Wage 06/01/2002 Employment Policies Institute The Local Area Unemployment Crisis Minimum Wage 06/01/2002 Andre Neveu - Employment Policies Institute Where the Jobs Aren’t: Local Unemployment Spreads 06/01/2002 Dr. David A. Macpherson - Florida State University The Effects of the Proposed California Minimum Wage Increase Living Wage 06/01/2002 Dr. David A. Macpherson - Florida State University The Employment Impact of a Comprehensive Living Wage Law, Evidence from Florida Living Wage 04/01/2002 Employment Policies Institute Measuring Poverty in America: Science or Politics? 03/01/2002 Dr. John P. Formby - University of Alabama, Dr. John A. Bishop - East Carolina University, Mr. Hoseong Kim - University of Alabama The Economic Well-Being of Low-Income Working Families Living Wage, Minimum Wage 12/01/2001 Dr. Estevao - IMF, Dr. Saul Lach, Hebrew University Measuring Temporary Labor Outsourcing in U.S. Manufacturing Overtime 10/01/2001 Dr. Thomas A. Mroz - University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Dr. Timothy H. Savage - Welch Consulting Economists The Long-Term Effects of Youth Unemployment Minimum Wage, Teen Unemployment 08/01/2001 Employment Policies Institute The Local Unemployment Crisis Minimum Wage 07/01/2001 Employment Policies Institute The Minimum Wage and the Earned Income Tax Credit: A Decade of Progress Minimum Wage 07/01/2001 Employment Policies Institute The Case for a Targeted Living Wage Subsidy Living Wage 06/01/2001 Walter Wessels - North Carolina State University The Effect of Minimum Wages on the Labor Force Participation Rates of Teenagers Minimum Wage, Teen Unemployment 06/01/2001 Richard Vedder - Ohio University, Lowell Gallaway - Ohio University Does the Minimum Wage Reduce Poverty? Minimum Wage 06/01/2001 Thomas MaCurdy - Stanford University, Frank McIntyre - Stanford University Winners and Losers of Federal and State Minimum Wages Minimum Wage 03/01/2001 Employment Policies Institute State Flexibility: The Minimum Wage and Welfare Reform Minimum Wage 12/01/2000 Aaron S Yelowitz - University of California at Los Angeles Evaluating the Effects of Medicaid on Welfare and Work: Evidence from the Past Decade Overtime 10/01/2000 Dr. David A. Macpherson - Florida State University The Effects of the Proposed California Minimum Wage Increase Minimum Wage 09/01/2000 Mark Turner - Johns Hopkins University, Berna Demiralp - Johns Hopkins University Higher Minimum Wages Harm Minority and Inner-City Teens Minimum Wage, Teen Unemployment 08/01/2000 Employment Policies Institute The Living Wage: Survey of Labor Economists Living Wage 08/01/2000 Employment Policies Institute Living Wage Policy: The Basics Living Wage 07/01/2000 Barry Hirsch - Trinity University The Relative Compensation of Part-Time and Full-Time Workers Overtime 07/01/2000 Employment Policies Institute National Good Times, Local Bad Times: The Local Area Unemployment Crisis Minimum Wage 07/01/2000 Employment Policies Institute Correcting Part-time Misconceptions Overtime 01/01/2000 William Even - Miami University of Ohio, David A. Macpherson - Florida State University Rising Above The Minimum Wage Minimum Wage 07/01/1999 George Tolley - University of Chicago, Peter Bernstein - DePaul University, Michael Lesage - RCF Economic & Financial Consulting Economic Analysis of a Living Wage Ordinance Living Wage 07/01/1999 Employment Policies Institute The Employment Impact of a Comprehensive Living Wage Law, Evidence from California Living Wage 02/01/1999 Daniel N. Shaviro - New York University School of Law Effective Marginal Tax Rates on Low Income Households Living Wage, Minimum Wage 10/01/1998 Employment Policies Institute The Baltimore Living Wage Study: Omissions, Fabrications and Flaws Living Wage 06/01/1998 Frank J. Tannery - University of Pittsburgh Targeted Jobs Tax Credits and Labor Market Experience Overtime 05/01/1998 Dr. David A. Macpherson - Florida State University Effects of the Proposed 1999-2000 Washington Minimum Wage Increase Minimum Wage 05/01/1998 Dr. David A. Macpherson - Florida State University Effects of the 1998-1999 Oregon Minimum Wage Increase Minimum Wage 03/01/1998 Dr. David A. Macpherson - Florida State University Effects of the 1998 California Minimum Wage Increase Minimum Wage 02/01/1998 Employment Policies Institute Job Loss in a Booming Economy Overtime 05/01/1997 Casey B. Mulligan - University of Chicago Work Ethic and Family Background 05/01/1997 Employment Policies Institute Q & A: Minimum Wage Employee Profile Minimum Wage 02/01/1997 Employment Policies Institute From Welfare to Work. The Transition of an Illiterate Population Overtime 07/01/1996 Derek Neal - University of Chicago Who Are The “Low Wage” Workers? Living Wage, Minimum Wage 05/01/1996 Dr. David A. Macpherson - Florida State University The 1992 New Jersey Minimum Wage Increase: How Much Did it Affect Family Income? Minimum Wage 04/01/1996 Employment Policies Institute The Crippling Flaws in the New Jersey Fast Food Study Minimum Wage 10/01/1995 Dr. Daniel Hamermesh and David Scoones - University of Texas at Austin The Impact of the Federal Unemployment Insurance Tax Ceiling Minimum Wage 08/01/1995 Dr. David Neumark - Michigan State University Effects of Minimum Wages on Teenage Employment, Enrollment and Idleness Minimum Wage, Teen Unemployment 06/01/1995 Dr. Bradley Schiller - American University Youth Employment in the Hospitality Sector Overtime 05/01/1995 Dr. David Macpherson - Florida State University Dr. William Even - Miami University The Consequences of Indexing the Minimum Wage to Average Wages in the U.S. Economy Minimum Wage 02/01/1995 Dr. Peter D. Brandon - University of Wisconsin Jobs Taken by Mothers Moving From Welfare to Work: And the Effects of Minimum Wages on this Transition Minimum Wage 01/01/1995 Kevin Lang - Boston University Minimum Wage Laws and the Distribution of Employment Minimum Wage 08/01/1994 Simon Rottenberg - University of Massachusetts Mandates in Employment: A History of Added Burdens on the Unskilled Overtime 07/01/1994 Julia Lane - American University Labor Demand Elasticities and Clinton Health Care Reform Overtime 09/01/1993 June O'Neil - City University of New York, Dave O'Neil - City University of New York The Impact of a Health Insurance Mandate on Labor Costs and Employment Overtime 01/01/1993 Dwight Lee - University of Georgia, Ronald Warren - University of Georgia Mandated Health Insurance, the Low Wage Employee, and the Distribution of Income Overtime

 

 

 

 

Or how about a real-life example? Link3

 

In 2007, the United States government imposed a new federal minimum wage on American Samoa and the Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI.) While this increase was well intended—a response to the islanders' wages being lower than that of their mainland counterparts—the results have been nothing less than devastating.

 

According to a new report from the United States General Accountability Office (GAO), the 19 percent decline in employment in the workforce that American Samoa has experienced since 2008 was in large part the result of imposing minimum hourly wages across various industries. The island’s primary industry is tuna fish canning, with major employers Chicken of the Sea closing and Starkist announcing huge layoffs. In 2008 the number of workers in the canneries was slightly more than 19,000 but has since fallen to 15,400.

 

Imagine the impact of this kind of job loss on an island with a total population of just over 67,000 people. At the same time, according to the GAO, the value of canned tuna fell from almost $600 million at the end of 2008 to $312 million by the beginning of 2010. What is even more astonishing is that, despite minimum wage laws, earning overall for American Samoans has fallen. “For the period from 2006 to 2009, average inflation-adjusted earnings fell by 11 percent. This resulted from a rise in average annual earnings of about 5 percent while local prices rose by about 18 percent,” the GAO report stated.

 

 

 

Why don't you try telling the poor people of American Samoa that have been absolutely DEVASTATED by moronic minimum wage laws that "the evidence is weak", and let me know how that works out for you? Lol...

 

 

How about a nice dose of facts,

 

Why yes, that would be very nice. Please let me know when you plan to post some that are not totally irrelevant to the discussion at hand, like the demographics of minimum wage workers or how many idiots (or racists) foolishly support minimum wage laws. Good luck.

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Libs love hurting the poor by supporting things that make it LOOK like they care about the poor.

 

It's very evil.

+1

 

It's amazing to watch liberals punish the poor and middle class, while pretending that they are protecting them from those evil republicans.

 

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