Jump to content

The gooper adults finally awaken, try to take back party.


Recommended Posts

Is it possible that there are at least a few goopers who love their country more than they love anarchy and OPM?

 

We'll see...

 

If nothing else, this should provide hours of fun for pundits and NHBers.

 

Leaders of the Republican establishment, alarmed by the emergence of far-right and often unpredictable Tea Party candidates, are pushing their party to rethink how it chooses nominees and advocating changes they say would result in the selection of less extreme contenders.

 

The push comes as the national Republican Party is grappling with vexing divisions over its identity and image, and mainstream leaders complain that more ideologically-driven conservatives are damaging the party with tactics like the government shutdown.

 

The debate intensified on Wednesday after Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II, the deeply conservative Republican candidate for governor of Virginia, lost a close race in which Democrats highlighted his opposition to abortion in almost all circumstances, his views on contraception and comments in which he seemed to liken immigration policy to pest control.

The party leaders pushing for changes want to replace state caucuses and conventions, like the one that nominated Mr. Cuccinelli, with a more open primary system that they believe will draw a broader cross-section of Republicans and produce more moderate candidates.

 

Similar pushes are already underway in other states, including Montana and Utah, and last week Mitt Romney said Republicans should consider how to overhaul their presidential nominating process to attract a wider range of voters. He suggested that states holding open primaries be rewarded with more delegates to the party’s national convention.

While the discussion may appear arcane, it reflects a fierce struggle for power between the activist, often Tea Party-dominated wing of the Republican Party — whose members tend to be devoted to showing up and organizing at events like party conventions — and the more mainstream wing, which is frustrated by its inability to rein in the extremist elements and by the fact that its message is not resonating with more voters...

 

From http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/07/us/politics/gop-weighs-limiting-clout-of-right-wing.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&_r=0

 

cc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With the ObamaCare scheme in the toilet and no HOPE and CHANGE in sight, what better way to while away a slow Friday than to ponder and pretend to care about the future of the GOP (also referred to in middle school terms as goopers!)!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's most likely too little and too late for the dwindling numbers of grown-up goopers to undo the damage of their bastard offspring and prevent another Clinton administration.

 

The bright spot for "goopers" is they won't have to campaign defending themselves on ObamaCare or a 7.3 percent unemployment rate. As for another Clinton administration, it could happen unless another pretty boy turns Democrat heads. (It happened before).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For what?

 

Why do you tee-hatters hate the only grownups in your party?

 

cc

 

The grown-ups are the ones who state the obvious about the fiscal lid that is being blown off our financial house...the only group that happen to believe in what the 'debt commission' concluded, and was subsequently ignored by obama, dems and 'establishment Republicans.'

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

The grown-ups are the ones who state the obvious about the fiscal lid that is being blown off our financial house...the only group that happen to believe in what the 'debt commission' concluded, and was subsequently ignored by obama, dems and 'establishment Republicans.'

 

What do you say to the people - specifically economists - who say that the debt, while a potential long-term problem, isn't the most pressing economic issue the country faces now?

 

...These dry numbers translate into millions of human tragedies — homes lost, careers destroyed, young people who can’t get their lives started. And many people have pleaded all along for policies that put job creation front and center. Their pleas have, however, been drowned out by the voices of conventional prudence. We can’t spend more money on jobs, say these voices, because that would mean more debt. We can’t even hire unemployed workers and put idle savings to work building roads, tunnels, schools. Never mind the short run, we have to think about the future!

 

The bitter irony, then, is that it turns out that by failing to address unemployment, we have, in fact, been sacrificing the future, too. What passes these days for sound policy is in fact a form of economic self-mutilation, which will cripple America for many years to come. Or so say researchers from the Federal Reserve, and I’m sorry to say that I believe them...

 

From http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/08/opinion/krugman-the-mutilated-economy.html?partner=rssnyt&emc=rss&_r=0

 

cc

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

 

What do you say to the people - specifically economists - who say that the debt, while a potential long-term problem, isn't the most pressing economic issue the country faces now?

 

...These dry numbers translate into millions of human tragedies — homes lost, careers destroyed, young people who can’t get their lives started. And many people have pleaded all along for policies that put job creation front and center. Their pleas have, however, been drowned out by the voices of conventional prudence. We can’t spend more money on jobs, say these voices, because that would mean more debt. We can’t even hire unemployed workers and put idle savings to work building roads, tunnels, schools. Never mind the short run, we have to think about the future!

The bitter irony, then, is that it turns out that by failing to address unemployment, we have, in fact, been sacrificing the future, too. What passes these days for sound policy is in fact a form of economic self-mutilation, which will cripple America for many years to come. Or so say researchers from the Federal Reserve, and I’m sorry to say that I believe them...

 

From http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/08/opinion/krugman-the-mutilated-economy.html?partner=rssnyt&emc=rss&_r=0

 

cc

 

 

I would say to those economists that, yes, we could spend enough money to drive unemployment to record lows. But artificially inflating that bubble will be short lived and only delay the inevitable for a very short time...and it will make the popping bubble that much more painful.

 

There is a price to be paid by having one bubble at another and it will be painful. If we were to deflate the bubble in a controlled manner, we could probably mitigate the pain. That is not politically popular so it won't be done. As a result, every effort will be made to keep the bubble artificially inflated until the whole thing pops. At that point, it's over. The lynchpin will likely be a lack of confidence in the dollar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Tea Party is strong and well. It's the left that's in trouble, not the right.

I love how Chris Christie won by 27% in a blue state, and Cucci lost by 3 in a swing state. The huge difference between the two is Christie is pragmatic, and Cucci was a Tea Bagger loon!

 

ebo6-kfdi069daulnf_otg.png

 

That's not even counting the shut down numbers!!! Down, Down, Down!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Is it possible that there are at least a few goopers who love their country more than they love anarchy and OPM?

 

We'll see...

 

If nothing else, this should provide hours of fun for pundits and NHBers.

 

Leaders of the Republican establishment, alarmed by the emergence of far-right and often unpredictable Tea Party candidates, are pushing their party to rethink how it chooses nominees and advocating changes they say would result in the selection of less extreme contenders.

The push comes as the national Republican Party is grappling with vexing divisions over its identity and image, and mainstream leaders complain that more ideologically-driven conservatives are damaging the party with tactics like the government shutdown.

The debate intensified on Wednesday after Kenneth T. Cuccinelli II, the deeply conservative Republican candidate for governor of Virginia, lost a close race in which Democrats highlighted his opposition to abortion in almost all circumstances, his views on contraception and comments in which he seemed to liken immigration policy to pest control.

The party leaders pushing for changes want to replace state caucuses and conventions, like the one that nominated Mr. Cuccinelli, with a more open primary system that they believe will draw a broader cross-section of Republicans and produce more moderate candidates.

Similar pushes are already underway in other states, including Montana and Utah, and last week Mitt Romney said Republicans should consider how to overhaul their presidential nominating process to attract a wider range of voters. He suggested that states holding open primaries be rewarded with more delegates to the party’s national convention.

While the discussion may appear arcane, it reflects a fierce struggle for power between the activist, often Tea Party-dominated wing of the Republican Party — whose members tend to be devoted to showing up and organizing at events like party conventions — and the more mainstream wing, which is frustrated by its inability to rein in the extremist elements and by the fact that its message is not resonating with more voters...

 

From http://www.nytimes.com/2013/11/07/us/politics/gop-weighs-limiting-clout-of-right-wing.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&_r=0

 

cc

It's to late for them. The new younger voting block has shown up and they're voting Democrat. Chris Christie just won reelection soley on the Sandy bump, and no support by national Democrats for their candidate, and is now already back tracking on immigration reform. Republicans can always be counted on to double down on stupid. In the past when they had the numbers of voters they needed, that may have worked. The majority of voters in the Virginia elections have stated that far right social issues, especially abortion, is what swayed their vote. The elections for mayors in the major cities which nobody seems to have paid attention too saw 22 Democrats win those elections. At least 6 governors races next year have Democrats winning, and as sequester cuts cause even more pain for the middleclass and working poor next year, it doesn't take a political science degree to see the Republicans are in big trouble.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10-16-2013_1.png

Oooh!!!

 

Even Republicans can't stand the Tea Party:

"In the current survey, just 27% of moderate and liberal Republicans have a favorable impression of the Tea Party, down from 46% in June." (same Pew Poll)http://www.people-press.org/2013/10/16/tea-partys-image-turns-more-negative/

 

Wow, thank God Tea Party is the minority in the Republican Party:

"Cruz’s favorability now stands at 74 percent, up from 47 percent in July. His favorability remains at 25 percent among mainstream Republicans

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2013/10/poll-gop-tea-party-98409.html#ixzz2kGUM3Rrq

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh my god. You didn't see the irony? You demented zombies talking about what's "good for the country". LOL. I think we all have had enough of you guys telling us what's "good for the country".

And this country's had enough of your ilk trying to force your vile ideology ideology down it's throat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And this country's had enough of your ilk trying to force your vile ideology ideology down it's throat.

LOL, another priceless gem. YOU are the ones who rammed the vile ideology of govt healthcare down our throats. You're a little confused. Take your time, calm down, take a deep breath, and explain to all the fine folks exactly what my vile ideology consists of. You can barely tie your own shoes, so I don't expect much.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

LOL, another priceless gem. YOU are the ones who rammed the vile ideology of govt healthcare down our throats. You're a little confused. Take your time, calm down, take a deep breath, and explain to all the fine folks exactly what my vile ideology consists of. You can barely tie your own shoes, so I don't expect much.

The American people showed their support of the ACA when they re-elected Barack Obama and rejected R-money, who's campaign's lynchpin was overturning it. You really are one ignorant bitch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The American people showed their support of the ACA when they re-elected Barack Obama and rejected R-money, who's campaign's lynchpin was overturning it. You really are one ignorant bitch.

The American people re-elected a Liar who knew in 2010 that millions were going to lose their insurance. You're weak and a bootlicker. Your daughter is a hooker.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...