Jump to content

How Bad Is Obamacare? Even Dumb Blondes Know!!!


Rayj
 Share

Recommended Posts

Suzanne Somers: The Affordable Care Act Is a Socialist Ponzi Scheme
  • OB-YV315_expert_C_20130909095823.jpg

What will the Affordable Care Act mean for retirees?

 

SUZANNE SOMERS: As a writer of 24 books mostly on health and wellness and by using my celebrity to get to the best and brightest doctors, scientists and medical professionals in the alternative and integrative health-care world, I have come to the following conclusions:

First of all, let’s call affordable health care what it really is: It’s socialized medicine.

 

I’ve had an opportunity to watch the Canadian version of affordable health care in action with all its limitations with my Canadian husband’s family. A few years ago, I was startled to see the cover of Maclean’s, a national Canadian magazine, showing a picture of a dog on an examining table with the headline, “Your Dog Can Get Better Health Care Than You.” It went on to say that young Canadian medical students have no incentive to become doctors to humans because they can’t make any money. Instead, there is a great surge of Canadian students becoming veterinarians. That’s where the money is. A Canadian animal can have timely MRIs, surgeries and any number of tests it needs to receive quality health care.

 

My sister-in-law had to wait two months to get a General Practitioner. During this period she spent her days in bed vomiting continuously, unable to get any food or drink down because she couldn’t get an appointment with the doctor. When she finally did, the doctor said, “Oh you don’t need me, you need a specialist.” That took another two weeks until she got a pill that corrected the problem.

 

Really, is this what we want?

 

All of my husband’s cousins are doctors. Several have moved to the U.S. because after their years of intensive schooling, they want to reap financial rewards. My 75-year-old Canadian girlfriend was denied treatment because she was too old. She died recently, having been given palliative care. That’s all the system would allow.

 

Affordable care will allow for pre-existing conditions. That’s the good part for retirees. But, let’s get down and dirty; the word “affordable” is a misnomer. So far, all you are hearing on the news is how everyone’s premiums are doubling and tripling and it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to recognize that the whole thing is a big mess. Plus, even after Obamacare is fully implemented, there still will be tens of millions of people not covered. So what’s the point? Medical care will be degraded, the costs will skyrocket, and most frightening of all, your most intimate and personal information is now up for grabs.

 

So, is affordable care a good thing for retirees? Perhaps over time, it might work if you don’t get too old and you don’t get too sick, and you don’t live too long. But frankly, the economic ramifications with our already swollen debt load don’t add up. Retirees who are on Medicare will suffer the consequences of 700 billions of Medicare dollars instead being used to cover the skyrocketing cost of Obamacare. In essence, less dollars for seniors, means less service. Not fair. The Boomers are going to take the “hit.” In Obamacare, “too old” has limitations of service.

 

Boomers are smart. They see the train wreck coming… most I speak with think the Affordable Care Act is a greater Ponzi scheme than that pulled off by Bernie Madoff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Suzanne Somers: The Affordable Care Act Is a Socialist Ponzi Scheme

  • OB-YV315_expert_C_20130909095823.jpg

What will the Affordable Care Act mean for retirees?

 

SUZANNE SOMERS: As a writer of 24 books mostly on health and wellness and by using my celebrity to get to the best and brightest doctors, scientists and medical professionals in the alternative and integrative health-care world, I have come to the following conclusions:

First of all, let’s call affordable health care what it really is: It’s socialized medicine.

 

I’ve had an opportunity to watch the Canadian version of affordable health care in action with all its limitations with my Canadian husband’s family. A few years ago, I was startled to see the cover of Maclean’s, a national Canadian magazine, showing a picture of a dog on an examining table with the headline, “Your Dog Can Get Better Health Care Than You.” It went on to say that young Canadian medical students have no incentive to become doctors to humans because they can’t make any money. Instead, there is a great surge of Canadian students becoming veterinarians. That’s where the money is. A Canadian animal can have timely MRIs, surgeries and any number of tests it needs to receive quality health care.

 

My sister-in-law had to wait two months to get a General Practitioner. During this period she spent her days in bed vomiting continuously, unable to get any food or drink down because she couldn’t get an appointment with the doctor. When she finally did, the doctor said, “Oh you don’t need me, you need a specialist.” That took another two weeks until she got a pill that corrected the problem.

 

Really, is this what we want?

 

All of my husband’s cousins are doctors. Several have moved to the U.S. because after their years of intensive schooling, they want to reap financial rewards. My 75-year-old Canadian girlfriend was denied treatment because she was too old. She died recently, having been given palliative care. That’s all the system would allow.

 

Affordable care will allow for pre-existing conditions. That’s the good part for retirees. But, let’s get down and dirty; the word “affordable” is a misnomer. So far, all you are hearing on the news is how everyone’s premiums are doubling and tripling and it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to recognize that the whole thing is a big mess. Plus, even after Obamacare is fully implemented, there still will be tens of millions of people not covered. So what’s the point? Medical care will be degraded, the costs will skyrocket, and most frightening of all, your most intimate and personal information is now up for grabs.

 

So, is affordable care a good thing for retirees? Perhaps over time, it might work if you don’t get too old and you don’t get too sick, and you don’t live too long. But frankly, the economic ramifications with our already swollen debt load don’t add up. Retirees who are on Medicare will suffer the consequences of 700 billions of Medicare dollars instead being used to cover the skyrocketing cost of Obamacare. In essence, less dollars for seniors, means less service. Not fair. The Boomers are going to take the “hit.” In Obamacare, “too old” has limitations of service.

 

Boomers are smart. They see the train wreck coming… most I speak with think the Affordable Care Act is a greater Ponzi scheme than that pulled off by Bernie Madoff.

 

Yeah all the informed people get their info from the National Inquirer and Suzanne Somers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, it seems that the Republicans are getting all their information from "dumb" people

 

Suzanne Somers, expert on nothing

 

http://www.latimes.com/business/hiltzik/la-fi-mh-suzanne-somers-20131030,0,7782801.story#axzz2jR58uqwD

 

 

By Michael Hiltzik

October 30, 2013, 2:52 p.m.

Noted healthcare economist Suzanne Somers received a full screen's worth of valuable Wall Street Journal online space the other day to deliver her judgment on the Affordable Care Act. Before we get to the substance of her argument, let's acknowledge that her piece has added to her worldwide fame. It may not do great things for the Journal's reputation, though.

 

Somers, last seen hawking exercise equipment and cure-all elixirs in infomercials and her website, declared the act to be a "Socialist Ponzi Scheme." She wrote: "Let's call affordable health care what it really is: It's socialized medicine." This viewpoint probably conforms to that of the Wall Street Journal's editorial page, in which case they deserve each other

.

But in terms of facts: Sorry, no. The Affordable Care Act actually leaves U.S. healthcare in the hands of the private insurance industry. That's not socialism. As for calling the act "a greater Ponzi scheme than that pulled off by Bernie Madoff," it's embarrassing even to have to debunk this. Suffice to say it shows Somers to know nothing about (a) Ponzi schemes, ( B) Bernie Madoff, or © the Affordable Care Act. But we knew that.

 

Somers uses this assertion to veer into an extended rant about the Canadian healthcare system, which of course isn't what we have in the United States. In any event, she gets the facts and figures about the Canadian system wildly wrong, as this post by Aaron Carroll, a true-to-life healthcare expert, explains.

 

The real question raised by Somers' post, which has already generated a three-part correction, is whether the Wall Street Journal has any standards at all for what it publishes in this online feature labeled, we assume not facetiously, "The Experts."

 

Presumably the Journal is above featuring blond actresses on its website purely as clickbait, but then what's the answer? The blog's editor, Larry Rout, told the Poynter Institute's MediaWire that its goal is to showcase "a variety of viewpoints” from a “growing group of elite panelists.” Yes, but where does Somers fit in again?

 

Certainly there's nothing new about entertainment figures being sought after for their views on the weighty issues of the day. Celebrity can be a powerful instrument when it serves laudable causes -- antipoverty, peace, universal healthcare. It can also be dangerous. The starlet Jenny McCarthy, lately awarded a spot on the popular talk show "The View," is a noted anti-vaccine campaigner, a movement that causes illness and death.

 

The exploitation of star power on behalf of any public issue, pro or con, should be treated with great caution, lest you end up with cases like Dr. Oz giving the unqualified green light to the potentially hazardous activity of tackle football in school, a disgraceful act we reported on a few days ago.

 

When someone like Somers is labeled an "expert," red flags should wave. Unless, that is, you subscribe to the theory put forth by the late Sen. Roman Hruska of Nebraska, who defended President Nixon's nomination of the resoundingly mediocre judge G. Harold Carswell to the Supreme Court by arguing, "There are a lot of mediocre judges and people and lawyers. They are entitled to a little representation, aren't they?" By that standard, sure: Suzanne Somers is an expert.

 

Suzanne Somers previous opinions:

 

By Christie D'Zurilla

October 9, 2013, 1:23 p.m.

 

Suzanne Somers is having sex — and a lot of it

 

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/gossip/la-et-mg-suzanne-somers-sex-life-20131009,0,7214680.story#axzz2jR58uqwD

Suzanne Somers is the luckiest woman in the whole, big, wide world.

Hands down.

 

The onetime "Three's Company" star, now 66, revealed Tuesday on "The Talk" that she has an active sex life. A very active sex life, with Alan Hamel, her husband of 36 years.

How active? Try twice a day, girlfriends! "He's on hormones, I'm on hormones ... ," Somers said by way of explanation.

When the roar of "The Talk" panel subsided, details were demanded. When? Back to back? Spread through the day?

With her guy, she explained, "There's some level at 4 in the morning and then I'm really awake around 8 or so. We have busy mornings."

So much for the snooze alarm.

 

It's not as if the info came out of nowhere — Somers, who's promoting her new book "I'm Too Young for This," told Katie Couric

that she's having the best sex of her life.

 

"A healthy person is a sexual person," Somers told Couric. "You know, it's all biology. Well first of all ... I desire him, to begin with."

Second of all, she said, he showed up in every past life she touched on during a past-lives experience in Santa Fe. The couple have been together for 45 years -- and, it appears, perhaps much longer than that, if you believe in reincarnation.

 

Somers, a breast cancer survivor, doesn't rely on pharmaceuticals or over-the-counter drugs to stay vital, she said last week at a stop in Toronto. Instead, she uses about 60 supplements, creams and a daily injection of human growth hormone to stay feeling young, according to the Edmonton Journal.

 

She admits she's no scientist, and she has her critics among the medical profession. But, she says, "How I became this [self-styled health advocate] seems kind of perfect to me because I love being my own experiment."

And experiment with twice-a-day results.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...