Jump to content

America needs National Oil


Recommended Posts

Wouldn't you like to enjoy cheaper gasoline? If business's using transportation had cheap gasoline, we would see price drops on products and services. It would also make them have a competitve edge globally.

 

Kuwait 0.85 gallon
Qatar 0.83 gallon
Saudi Arabia 0.61 gallon
Turkmenistan 0.72 gallon

 

United States: What is the outlook for gasoline prices for 2013 and for 2014?

EIA's projection, as of July 9, 2013, for the average retail price of regular-grade gasoline for July through December 2013 is $3.38 per gallon. The projection for the average retail price in 2014 is $3.37 per gallon. The national average retail price of a gallon of regular gasoline in July 2013 was $3.59.

http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=287&t=10


We need National Oil for America.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 120
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Wouldn't you like to enjoy cheaper gasoline? If business's using transportation had cheap gasoline, we would see price drops on products and services. It would also make them have a competitve edge globally.

 

Kuwait 0.85 gallon

Qatar 0.83 gallon

Saudi Arabia 0.61 gallon

Turkmenistan 0.72 gallon

 

United States: What is the outlook for gasoline prices for 2013 and for 2014?

 

EIA's projection, as of July 9, 2013, for the average retail price of regular-grade gasoline for July through December 2013 is $3.38 per gallon. The projection for the average retail price in 2014 is $3.37 per gallon. The national average retail price of a gallon of regular gasoline in July 2013 was $3.59.

 

http://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.cfm?id=287&t=10

 

We need National Oil for America.

 

I don't need national oil. I need you people to keep buying gas. Every time you buy it you're helping me pay for my lakehouse.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Start with Nationalizing the FED first.

 

Something worth bringing up in response to that is the power of the US dollar. Our bonds are in demand and we can produce them. We can't produce oil, and the Saudis, Kuwaitis, Canadians, Mexicans, and Venezuelans aren't going to sell us oil on the cheap. They can sell their own oil to their people cheap because they produce enough to meet that demand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Something worth bringing up in response to that is the power of the US dollar. Our bonds are in demand and we can produce them. We can't produce oil, and the Saudis, Kuwaitis, Canadians, Mexicans, and Venezuelans aren't going to sell us oil on the cheap. They can sell their own oil to their people cheap because they produce enough to meet that demand.

Why not?

 

We have enough oil to power the entire world for the next century, do we not?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Something worth bringing up in response to that is the power of the US dollar. Our bonds are in demand and we can produce them. We can't produce oil, and the Saudis, Kuwaitis, Canadians, Mexicans, and Venezuelans aren't going to sell us oil on the cheap. They can sell their own oil to their people cheap because they produce enough to meet that demand.

The thing is, is that the dollar has lost 90% of it's buying power since the privatization of the FED in 1913.

 

Notice our bonds are quickly becoming as worthless as the paper they are written on.

 

Also, I don't see why we couldn't produce enough oil to back it up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The thing is, is that the dollar has lost 90% of it's buying power since the privatization of the FED in 1913.

 

Notice our bonds are quickly becoming as worthless as the paper they are written on.

 

Bonds are only worthless when nobody will buy them. The country still has plenty of willing buyers.

 

 

Also, I don't see why we couldn't produce enough oil to back it up.

 

I suspect you know very little about the industry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why not?

 

We have enough oil to power the entire world for the next century, do we not?

 

LMAO! Some of these people are clueless, none of them have a reasonable rebuttal for why it is even a bad idea to have gasoline 6 times cheaper and no taxes on it. I assume they are anti-worker and think that hamburger flipper should be gouged to get to work, or McD's should increase hamburger prices to pay for delivery of their products due to high gasoline prices. Takes all kinds I guess,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

LMAO! Some of these people are clueless, none of them have a reasonable rebuttal for why it is even a bad idea to have gasoline 6 times cheaper and no taxes on it. I assume they are anti-worker and think that hamburger flipper should be gouged to get to work, or McD's should increase hamburger prices to pay for delivery of their products due to high gasoline prices. Takes all kinds I guess,

We have a burger joint here in Vegas Calld the In and Out. I'm told it is run by Mormons,

 

Anyhow, they START their workers at 10 bucks an hour, and offer full time. I eat there when I want fast food. The bonus? It's fuucking GREAT. They do only the basics, so they do it right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No. Am I misinfiormed? Given fracking, I am under the impression that we are now sitting on an ocean of recoverable oil. Not light sweet crude, but serviceable.

 

Yes, you're partially misinformed. The US does have significant energy resources, but there's the issue of realistic production volume. ANWR might contain 16 billion barrels of oil, and some "expert" will say it's enough to power the US for two years, but if it can only sustain 2 million barrels a day then it's not going to power the US for more than two hours a day.

 

PeMex has learned this the hard way with Cantarella. They've injected so much water and gas into the wells there to maintain production that they're not getting economic flow rates at a lot of those sites anymore. There's still a ton of oil left there too.

 

The oil coming out of Bakken is low in sulfur content, and once you get it out of the rock it will happily flow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a burger joint here in Vegas Calld the In and Out. I'm told it is run by Mormons,

 

Anyhow, they START their workers at 10 bucks an hour, and offer full time. I eat there when I want fast food. The bonus? It's fuucking GREAT. They do only the basics, so they do it right.

Yes, we have IN/OUT here, she lives next door!! :D Nah, we have it as well, natural burgers, fries cut for each order, all natural. I don't do fast foods anymore on my natural diet. I might sample come December. Been wanting some home made tamalas from a market downtown.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, we have IN/OUT here, she lives next door!! :D Nah, we have it as well, natural burgers, fries cut for each order, all natural. I don't do fast foods anymore on my natural diet. I might sample come December. Been wanting some home made tamalas from a market downtown.

I bought some a few years back from a mecican immigrant lady. Was doing dinner at my brother's house, and the door bell rang. I was closest, so I got it. This peasant lady, wearing indian garb - obviously fresh from the Mexican hills - is towing a wagon. Her four year old is translating. She's selling tamales a buck a piece, door to door. They cost 50 cents to make, no doubt. Maybe more.

 

I looked at this tough little gal, towing her wagon and FINDING A WAY to contribute to her family's success in the face of massive roadblocks (language, education, culture...), and I bought a dozen. Tossed em on the table and said, "We have another course." Everyone got a good laugh.

 

 

Yes, you're partially misinformed. The US does have significant energy resources, but there's the issue of realistic production volume. ANWR might contain 16 billion barrels of oil, and some "expert" will say it's enough to power the US for two years, but if it can only sustain 2 million barrels a day then it's not going to power the US for more than two hours a day.

 

PeMex has learned this the hard way with Cantarella. They've injected so much water and gas into the wells there to maintain production that they're not getting economic flow rates at a lot of those sites anymore. There's still a ton of oil left there too.

 

The oil coming out of Bakken is low in sulfur content, and once you get it out of the rock it will happily flow.

Got it - thanks.

 

By the way, I agree with the OP. I don't own the air a mile over my home. I don't think I have a claim to the oil a mile under it.

 

Nationalize oil, pay the national debt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Got it - thanks.

 

By the way, I agree with the OP. I don't own the air a mile over my home. I don't think I have a claim to the oil a mile under it.

 

Nationalize oil, pay the national debt.

 

Good luck with that. The production, transport, and refining infrastructure is all privately owned. How will nationalized oil pay down the debt while simultaneously providing us with cheap gas as the OP says???

 

Private oil bats a thousand. For every well run sooc like Aramco you have one in a country with oil everywhere and production is dropping, see PDVSA.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Yes, you're partially misinformed. The US does have significant energy resources, but there's the issue of realistic production volume. ANWR might contain 16 billion barrels of oil, and some "expert" will say it's enough to power the US for two years, but if it can only sustain 2 million barrels a day then it's not going to power the US for more than two hours a day.

 

PeMex has learned this the hard way with Cantarella. They've injected so much water and gas into the wells there to maintain production that they're not getting economic flow rates at a lot of those sites anymore. There's still a ton of oil left there too.

 

The oil coming out of Bakken is low in sulfur content, and once you get it out of the rock it will happily flow.

http://www.eia.gov/pub/oil_gas/natural_gas/analysis_publications/maps/maps.htm#pdf

 

We have so much oil we are exporting it. California alone has more oil than most of Europe, it bubbles out the ground from the North to the South. Off shore deposits and capped wells that never had a straw in them, millions of acres under lease that have never been drilled, tapped or utilized, or have been recapped. The demand is down and refinerys are closing as gas mileage increases, about 3-5% a year, and highbreds take over. All above ground oil storage is full including the national reserve. There is no reason, except profit driven companys to keep us from enjoying a $1. a gallon gasoline prices like these other countrys are doing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good luck with that. The production, transport, and refining infrastructure is all privately owned. How will nationalized oil pay down the debt while simultaneously providing us with cheap gas as the OP says???

None of that would change, nor should it. The only thing that would change is who gets the royalty checks. The royalty checks would be nationalized. Everything else would remain the same.

 

Face it. The folks that get the royalties now - they don't drill, transport, refine.

 

Nothing changes, except the checks go to America. The people share the fossil layer in common, as they currently share the sky.

 

As to the cheap gas - I think we HAVE cheap gas. If anyone disagrees, I think they have an inflated notion of the dollar.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.eia.gov/pub/oil_gas/natural_gas/analysis_publications/maps/maps.htm#pdf

 

We have so much oil we are exporting it. California alone has more oil than most of Europe, it bubbles out the ground from the North to the South. Off shore deposits and capped wells that never had a straw in them, millions of acres under lease that have never been drilled, tapped or utilized, or have been recapped. The demand is down and refinerys are closing as gas mileage increases, about 3-5% a year, and highbreds take over. All above ground oil storage is full including the national reserve. There is no reason, except profit driven companys to keep us from enjoying a $1. a gallon gasoline prices like these other countrys are doing.

 

The US exports very little oil as it's illegal without a special commerce department permit. We're importing millions of barrels a day still. That oil is going to cost us $100+ barrel nationalized oil or not. Ironically enough, much of those California deposits have been set off limits by the same government you want to run the oil industry, and the ones that aren't off limits are insignificant compared to what's been found in Alaska, North Dakota, Colorado, and Texas.

 

You're not understanding though. There's a limit on how much can be produced per day. Total reserves are meaningless.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

None of that would change, nor should it. The only thing that would change is who gets the royalty checks. The royalty checks would be nationalized. Everything else would remain the same.

 

Face it. The folks that get the royalties now - they don't drill, transport, refine.

 

Nothing changes, except the checks go to America. The people share the fossil layer in common, as they currently share the sky.

 

As to the cheap gas - I think we HAVE cheap gas. If anyone disagrees, I think they have an inflated notion of the dollar.

 

The US government charges royalties for production on federal lands. This state is full of people smart enough to buy mineral rights, and they're making $100k a month because of it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...